Discussion:
Jacob Rees-Mogg compares NHS consultant to doctor blamed for MMR vaccine scare
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Ian Jackson
2019-09-05 16:25:12 UTC
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Permalink
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
--
Ian
JNugent
2019-09-05 16:48:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????

What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?

Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
pensive hamster
2019-09-05 17:05:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
You'll have to ask the government that, they consulted him.
(Of course, it is established practice for governments of all
hues to commission expert advice, and then to ignore it.)

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/sep/05/rees-mogg-condemned-for-comparing-doctor-to-disgraced-anti-vaxxer-autism

'A senior doctor who helped draw up government medical plans for
a no-deal Brexit has threatened to sue Jacob Rees-Mogg after the
Commons leader compared him to the disgraced anti-vaxxer Andrew
Wakefield.

'... Nicholl, a consultant neurologist who drew up a risk register of
epilepsy and neurology drugs for the government’s Operation
Yellowhammer no-deal plans, told the Guardian that Rees-Mogg
had abused parliamentary privilege, which means MPs cannot be
sued over comments made in the Commons.'
Post by JNugent
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Grikbasshar®™
2019-09-05 17:32:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 5 Sep 2019 10:05:10 -0700 (PDT), pensive hamster
Post by pensive hamster
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
You'll have to ask the government that, they consulted him.
(Of course, it is established practice for governments of all
hues to commission expert advice, and then to ignore it.)
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/sep/05/rees-mogg-condemned-for-comparing-doctor-to-disgraced-anti-vaxxer-autism
'A senior doctor who helped draw up government medical plans for
a no-deal Brexit has threatened to sue Jacob Rees-Mogg after the
Commons leader compared him to the disgraced anti-vaxxer Andrew
Wakefield.
'... Nicholl, a consultant neurologist who drew up a risk register of
epilepsy and neurology drugs for the government’s Operation
Yellowhammer no-deal plans, told the Guardian that Rees-Mogg
had abused parliamentary privilege, which means MPs cannot be
sued over comments made in the Commons.'
That's not abusing it; that's enjoying it.
Peeler
2019-09-05 18:25:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 05 Sep 2019 10:32:21 -0700, clinically insane, pedophilic, serbian
bitch Razovic, the resident psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous
Post by Grikbasshar®™
Post by pensive hamster
'... Nicholl, a consultant neurologist who drew up a risk register of
epilepsy and neurology drugs for the government’s Operation
Yellowhammer no-deal plans, told the Guardian that Rees-Mogg
had abused parliamentary privilege, which means MPs cannot be
sued over comments made in the Commons.'
That's not abusing it; that's enjoying it.
ONLY in your sick psychopathic head, pedophilic gay Razovic!
--
Pedophilic dreckserb Razovic answering a question whether there
is any meaningful debate to lower the age of consent:
"If there isn't, there should be."
MID: <ZAMUE.174724$***@usenetxs.com>
The Todal
2019-09-05 21:17:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by pensive hamster
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
You'll have to ask the government that, they consulted him.
(Of course, it is established practice for governments of all
hues to commission expert advice, and then to ignore it.)
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/sep/05/rees-mogg-condemned-for-comparing-doctor-to-disgraced-anti-vaxxer-autism
'A senior doctor who helped draw up government medical plans for
a no-deal Brexit has threatened to sue Jacob Rees-Mogg after the
Commons leader compared him to the disgraced anti-vaxxer Andrew
Wakefield.
'... Nicholl, a consultant neurologist who drew up a risk register of
epilepsy and neurology drugs for the government’s Operation
Yellowhammer no-deal plans, told the Guardian that Rees-Mogg
had abused parliamentary privilege, which means MPs cannot be
sued over comments made in the Commons.'
https://www.facebook.com/LBC/videos/2419078938414307/
Pamela
2019-09-05 19:20:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.

The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
JNugent
2019-09-05 23:07:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Pamela
2019-09-05 23:22:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available. It's a direct consequence of a No Deal
crash out.

All Dr Nicholl can tell us is how many deaths that will cause. It needs
facing up to.
JNugent
2019-09-06 01:54:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual commercial
basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do
with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.

Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?

Or VAT?

Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the BOAR
at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to Manston by
Chinook?

[* However far-fetched.]
Post by Pamela
It's a direct consequence of a No Deal crash out.
Please show your working out. It should be interesting.
Post by Pamela
All Dr Nicholl can tell us is how many deaths that will cause. It needs
facing up to.
Someone needs to learn the differences in meaning between:

(a) "will" and

(b) "might, in the most extreme worst case scenario imaginable, however
unlikely".
Ian Jackson
2019-09-06 07:22:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it.
Translation:
"These things happen anyway. Shortages might have nothing to do with
Brexit."
--
Ian
Pamela
2019-09-06 09:21:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it.
"These things happen anyway. Shortages might have nothing to do with
Brexit."
Membership of the EU ensures the status quo, in which there are very few
shortages.

No Deal crash out Brexit makes the situation worse. Yellowhammer aims to
quantify the impact of the change.
tim...
2019-09-06 11:48:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it.
"These things happen anyway. Shortages might have nothing to do with
Brexit."
Membership of the EU ensures the status quo, in which there are very few
shortages.
that's a bit like arguing a battered wife should stay in the bad marriage
because her husband provides food for her

tim
Norman Wells
2019-09-06 11:52:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it.
"These things happen anyway. Shortages might have nothing to do with
Brexit."
Membership of the EU ensures the status quo, in which there are very few
shortages.
No Deal crash out Brexit makes the situation worse. Yellowhammer aims to
quantify the impact of the change.
It was a risk assessment exercise, and a very sensible one too. Its
purpose was to highlight potential problem areas so that they can be
removed or mitigated.

Your assumption seems to be that nothing whatever will be done, which is
wholly fallacious.

Perhaps you're not familiar with risk assessment and what it's for?
Pamela
2019-09-06 15:35:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it.
"These things happen anyway. Shortages might have nothing to do with
Brexit."
Membership of the EU ensures the status quo, in which there are very
few shortages.
No Deal crash out Brexit makes the situation worse. Yellowhammer aims
to quantify the impact of the change.
It was a risk assessment exercise, and a very sensible one too. Its
purpose was to highlight potential problem areas so that they can be
removed or mitigated.
Your assumption seems to be that nothing whatever will be done, which is
wholly fallacious.
What is actually being doing to address the Yellowhammer warnings? The
neurologist speaking to rees-Mogg didn't think all would be well.
Post by Norman Wells
Perhaps you're not familiar with risk assessment and what it's for?
I am more than sufficiently familiar with risk assessment. The question is
is there time to do all that's needed and the answer is no. Thanks Boris.
Norman Wells
2019-09-06 16:32:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it.
"These things happen anyway. Shortages might have nothing to do with
Brexit."
Membership of the EU ensures the status quo, in which there are very
few shortages.
No Deal crash out Brexit makes the situation worse. Yellowhammer aims
to quantify the impact of the change.
It was a risk assessment exercise, and a very sensible one too. Its
purpose was to highlight potential problem areas so that they can be
removed or mitigated.
Your assumption seems to be that nothing whatever will be done, which is
wholly fallacious.
What is actually being doing to address the Yellowhammer warnings? The
neurologist speaking to rees-Mogg didn't think all would be well.
Post by Norman Wells
Perhaps you're not familiar with risk assessment and what it's for?
I am more than sufficiently familiar with risk assessment.
Good. So, when you carry one out or receive one, what do you do?
Post by Pamela
The question is
is there time to do all that's needed and the answer is no.
Who says?

Anyone apart from you?
Post by Pamela
Thanks Boris.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-06 07:26:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the BOAR
at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to Manston by
Chinook?
[* However far-fetched.]
Yes. Manston is officially closed (except for when the Skripals needed to
leave the country quietly).
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
It's a direct consequence of a No Deal crash out.
Please show your working out. It should be interesting.
Post by Pamela
All Dr Nicholl can tell us is how many deaths that will cause. It needs
facing up to.
(a) "will" and
(b) "might, in the most extreme worst case scenario imaginable, however
unlikely".
tim...
2019-09-06 09:15:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are produced,
stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual commercial basis. They
are a product of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do with the
goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the BOAR
at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to Manston by
Chinook?
because Manston has closed

tim
JNugent
2019-09-06 10:55:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual commercial
basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do
with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty. If they had to
(they don't), they could land on the apron at Dover Eastern Docks.
tim...
2019-09-06 11:47:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual commercial
basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do
with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the BOAR
at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to Manston by
Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well

the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff

tim
JNugent
2019-09-06 15:47:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's
nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
Pamela
2019-09-06 17:36:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual he
is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have
in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and
logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from
the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No
Deal must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him
to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would
be anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for
that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure
essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's
nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course, know far
more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice. Why not read
the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical Journal to see how
they characterise the problem?

Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's lickspittle Sajid
Javid and the problem still remains.
abelard
2019-09-06 18:31:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual he
is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have
in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and
logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from
the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No
Deal must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him
to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would
be anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for
that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure
essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's
nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course, know far
more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice. Why not read
the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical Journal to see how
they characterise the problem?
you really are a prize gull...

this sort of fake 'news' is spread by the likes of big pharma
who want to jack up prices, medics who want more government
money, and idiots like fascist 'new' labour who want to be driven
in gov't limousines plus 'civil' 'servants' who crave relevance

you must be among the most ignorant posters ever seen here abouts!
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's lickspittle Sajid
Javid and the problem still remains.
ah yes, but the likes of agent cob know that idiots like you will fall
for it their nonsense every time
--
www.abelard.org
JNugent
2019-09-06 23:27:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual he
is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have
in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and
logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from
the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No
Deal must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him
to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would
be anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for
that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure
essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's
nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course, know far
more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice. Why not read
the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical Journal to see how
they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's lickspittle Sajid
Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Pamela
2019-09-07 09:24:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual he
is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be -
have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and
logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from
the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of
No Deal must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned
him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines
would be anything other than the topmost priority for import
(and, for that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure
essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's
nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by
the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel
to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course, know
far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice. Why not
read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical Journal to
see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments. You're
just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly thinking you
are an expert.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's lickspittle
Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are not
already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and competitive
industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
JNugent
2019-09-07 14:29:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual he
is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be -
have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and
logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from
the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of
No Deal must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned
him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines
would be anything other than the topmost priority for import
(and, for that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure
essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's
nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by
the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel
to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course, know
far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice. Why not
read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical Journal to
see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments. You're
just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly thinking you
are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?

People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.

Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK becomes
independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed with far less
effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's lickspittle
Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are not
already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and competitive
industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.

Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with ingenuity
(and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might have after
independence are an order or two of magnitude lower than that was.
Pamela
2019-09-07 17:42:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 17:48  5 Sep 2019, JNugent
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual
he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be -
have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and
logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply
chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality
rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of
No Deal must have thought he was expert enough and
commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines
would be anything other than the topmost priority for import
(and, for that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism.
It's nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU
hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by
the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel
to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course, know
far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice. Why
not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly
thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK becomes
independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed with far less
effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's lickspittle
Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are not
already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and competitive
industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with ingenuity
(and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might have after
independence are an order or two of magnitude lower than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad lifted
by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
JNugent
2019-09-07 22:51:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 17:48  5 Sep 2019, JNugent
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual
he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be -
have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and
logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply
chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality
rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of
No Deal must have thought he was expert enough and
commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines
would be anything other than the topmost priority for import
(and, for that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism.
It's nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU
hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by
the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel
to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the EU
will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course, know
far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice. Why
not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly
thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK becomes
independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed with far less
effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's lickspittle
Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are not
already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and competitive
industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with ingenuity
(and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might have after
independence are an order or two of magnitude lower than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad lifted
by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or those
ones) out.
Pamela
2019-09-08 08:31:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
On 00:07  6 Sep 2019, JNugent
Post by JNugent
On 17:48  5 Sep 2019, JNugent
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual
he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be
- have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal
and logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply
chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality
rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems
of No Deal must have thought he was expert enough and
commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines
would be anything other than the topmost priority for import
(and, for that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things
are produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism.
It's nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU
hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up
by the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the
Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the
EU will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course,
know far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly
thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed with
far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's
lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are
not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with ingenuity
(and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might have after
independence are an order or two of magnitude lower than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or those
ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than ask me
to make it for you.
JNugent
2019-09-10 02:22:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
On 00:07  6 Sep 2019, JNugent
Post by JNugent
On 17:48  5 Sep 2019, JNugent
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting individual
he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be
- have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the legal
and logistical aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply
chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality
rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems
of No Deal must have thought he was expert enough and
commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines
would be anything other than the topmost priority for import
(and, for that matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things
are produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual
commercial basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism.
It's nothing to do with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU
hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up
by the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the
Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary, a
helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I expect
there'll be some willing to swear that only being a member of the
EU will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course,
know far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly
thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed with
far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using a
helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's
lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are
not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with ingenuity
(and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might have after
independence are an order or two of magnitude lower than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or those
ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than ask me
to make it for you.
Can you think of any reason why a wartime siege of Leningrad (you may
mean Stalingrad) might have been more difficult to lift than a mooted
peacetime "siege" of Calais?

No?

Not a single one?
Pamela
2019-09-10 07:58:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
On 00:07  6 Sep
Post by JNugent
On 17:48  5
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting
individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might
be - have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the
legal and logistical aspects of import/export
businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply
chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing
mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the
problems of No Deal must have thought he was expert
enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that
medicines would be anything other than the topmost
priority for import (and, for that matter for those
exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things
are produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly
contractual commercial basis. They are a product of
efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do with the goodwill
or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up
by the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the
Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary,
a helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I
expect there'll be some willing to swear that only being a
member of the EU will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course,
know far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's
Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly
thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed with
far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using
a helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's
lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are
not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with ingenuity
(and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might have after
independence are an order or two of magnitude lower than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or those
ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than ask
me to make it for you.
Can you think of any reason why a wartime siege of Leningrad (you may
mean Stalingrad) might have been more difficult to lift than a mooted
peacetime "siege" of Calais?
No?
Not a single one?
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
Leningrad was a seige and so were Odessa or Sevastopol that I also
mentioned.

(1) Berlin was a German seige -- broken by the Allied airlift.

(2) Leningrand was a German seige -- but it was not broken.

Your suggestion is specious that goods can be supplied purely by air if
there's a block on Channel ports by comparing it to what happened in the
biggest airlift in history and one conducted largely by non-British
airplanes.

Maybe you should double check your understanding of war history.
Stalingrad was the biggest armed confrontation in the history of warfare
and its example does little to illuminate any solution to goods shortages
in the Channel. By contrast, Leningrad was not an armed confrontations.
abelard
2019-09-10 09:44:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
--
www.abelard.org
tim...
2019-09-10 10:27:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
but so was Leningrad
Post by abelard
--
www.abelard.org
abelard
2019-09-10 10:50:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
but so was Leningrad
of course
--
www.abelard.org
Pamela
2019-09-10 12:04:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
Go back to studying Gothic architecture or whatever you are best at.

Being trapped in pocket or near encirclement is not the same as being
beseiged. The two are quite different. One directly cuts off all supply
lines and the other certainly doesn't.

That is what we are talking about with regard to medical supplies. Axis
forces may have had supply problems in Stalingrad but that's from Hitler
(once again) overextending his lines.

Your failed attempt at an opportunistic pot shot shows you up as an
ignoramus.
JNugent
2019-09-10 13:49:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
Go back to studying Gothic architecture or whatever you are best at.
Being trapped in pocket or near encirclement is not the same as being
beseiged. The two are quite different. One directly cuts off all supply
lines and the other certainly doesn't.
The consensus among military historians is that Stalingrad was besieged.

But perhaps they aren't as knowledgeable as you on the history that
theatre of war.
Post by Pamela
That is what we are talking about with regard to medical supplies. Axis
forces may have had supply problems in Stalingrad but that's from Hitler
(once again) overextending his lines.
What difference does that make? The reason for shortage is not what we
were discussing. We were discussing how to overcome such shortages. Or
at least, we were until you started discussing WW2 with your claim that
because the Allies couldn't break the siege of Leningrad, we wouldn't be
able to fly in medical supplies from the continent to the UK in a
continant at peace.

But perhaps the EU has a plan to start shooting down freight aircraft?
Post by Pamela
Your failed attempt at an opportunistic pot shot shows you up as an
ignoramus.
Pamela
2019-09-11 11:41:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
Go back to studying Gothic architecture or whatever you are best at.
Being trapped in pocket or near encirclement is not the same as being
beseiged. The two are quite different. One directly cuts off all
supply lines and the other certainly doesn't.
The consensus among military historians is that Stalingrad was besieged.
An army besieged in an enclave in battle is not the same as a besieged
city relieved by an air column, which is your analogy.

Please cite where anyone thinks Stalingrad was besieged in the manner of
Leningrad.

Also kindly explain how you think air relief losses at Stalingrad were
successful enough to be used as a model for meds across the Channel.
Post by JNugent
But perhaps they aren't as knowledgeable as you on the history that
theatre of war.
Post by Pamela
That is what we are talking about with regard to medical supplies.
Axis forces may have had supply problems in Stalingrad but that's from
Hitler (once again) overextending his lines.
What difference does that make? The reason for shortage is not what we
were discussing. We were discussing how to overcome such shortages. Or
at least, we were until you started discussing WW2 with your claim that
because the Allies couldn't break the siege of Leningrad, we wouldn't be
able to fly in medical supplies from the continent to the UK in a
continant at peace.
But perhaps the EU has a plan to start shooting down freight aircraft?
Your suggestion that I may have meant Stalingrad is ridiculous. Getting
medical supplies should not have to be like the great battles of war and
it shows your lack of proportion when you bring up Berlin and Stalingrad.

Your analogy of Channel medical supplies being relieved in the manner of
the seige of Berlin remains ridiculous.
abelard
2019-09-10 16:21:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
Go back to studying Gothic architecture or whatever you are best at.
no need to make excuses for your errors...you'd b e at it all week
--
www.abelard.org
Incubus
2019-09-10 16:49:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
Go back to studying Gothic architecture or whatever you are best at.
no need to make excuses for your errors...you'd b e at it all week
If Pamela were at it, I suspect she'd be a bit less uptight.
abelard
2019-09-10 18:11:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:49:28 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Post by Pamela
Post by abelard
Post by Pamela
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
of course it was you ignoramus
Go back to studying Gothic architecture or whatever you are best at.
no need to make excuses for your errors...you'd be at it all week
If Pamela were at it, I suspect she'd be a bit less uptight.
perhaps s/he could reidentify as a penguin
--
www.abelard.org
JNugent
2019-09-10 10:40:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
On 00:07  6 Sep
Post by JNugent
On 17:48  5
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting
individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might
be - have in (a) international trade policy and (b) the
legal and logistical aspects of import/export
businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply
chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing
mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the
problems of No Deal must have thought he was expert
enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that
medicines would be anything other than the topmost
priority for import (and, for that matter for those
exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things
are produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly
contractual commercial basis. They are a product of
efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do with the goodwill
or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up
by the BOAR at the production facility and flown across the
Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if necessary,
a helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution centre. But I
expect there'll be some willing to swear that only being a
member of the EU will enable cargo to be unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of course,
know far more than the true experts and always have cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's
Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but mistakenly
thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed with
far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of using
a helicopter? They were granted £434 million by Boris's
lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs are
not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with ingenuity
(and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might have after
independence are an order or two of magnitude lower than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or those
ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than ask
me to make it for you.
Can you think of any reason why a wartime siege of Leningrad (you may
mean Stalingrad) might have been more difficult to lift than a mooted
peacetime "siege" of Calais?
No?
Not a single one?
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you ninny.
Leningrad was a seige and so were Odessa or Sevastopol that I also
mentioned.
(1) Berlin was a German seige -- broken by the Allied airlift.
(2) Leningrand was a German seige -- but it was not broken.
Your suggestion is specious that goods can be supplied purely by air if
there's a block on Channel ports by comparing it to what happened in the
biggest airlift in history and one conducted largely by non-British
airplanes.
Maybe you should double check your understanding of war history.
Stalingrad was the biggest armed confrontation in the history of warfare
and its example does little to illuminate any solution to goods shortages
in the Channel. By contrast, Leningrad was not an armed confrontations.
And was it easy to fly helicopters into either Leningrad?

Or even fixed-wing aircraft?

Were any local difficulties likely to be encountered?

Don't forget: you cited Leningrad as a wartime precedent meaning that
flying in supplies of one class of non-bulky items was impossible or too
difficult in peacetime.

It was such a bad anaolgy that one wonders even now whether you expected
to be taken seriously with it.
Pamela
2019-09-10 12:01:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
On
00:07Ãâ€Ãâ
€ŠÃ‚Â
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
¡ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€šÃ‚  6 Sep
Post by JNugent
On
17:48Ãâ€Ãâ
€ŠÃ
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚  5
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting
individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might
be - have in (a) international trade policy and (b)
the legal and logistical aspects of import/export
businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs
supply chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing
mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the
problems of No Deal must have thought he was expert
enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that
medicines would be anything other than the topmost
priority for import (and, for that matter for those
exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These
things are produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly
contractual commercial basis. They are a product of
efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do with the goodwill
or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked
up by the BOAR at the production facility and flown across
the Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if
necessary, a helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution
centre. But I expect there'll be some willing to swear that
only being a member of the EU will enable cargo to be unloaded
even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of
course, know far more than the true experts and always have
cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but
mistakenly thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed
with far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of
using a helicopter? They were granted £434
million by Boris's lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem
still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs
are not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with
ingenuity (and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might
have after independence are an order or two of magnitude lower
than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or those
ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than
ask me to make it for you.
Can you think of any reason why a wartime siege of Leningrad (you may
mean Stalingrad) might have been more difficult to lift than a mooted
peacetime "siege" of Calais?
No?
Not a single one?
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you
ninny. Leningrad was a seige and so were Odessa or Sevastopol that I
also mentioned.
(1) Berlin was a German seige -- broken by the Allied airlift.
(2) Leningrand was a German seige -- but it was not broken.
Your suggestion is specious that goods can be supplied purely by air if
there's a block on Channel ports by comparing it to what happened in
the biggest airlift in history and one conducted largely by non-British
airplanes.
Maybe you should double check your understanding of war history.
Stalingrad was the biggest armed confrontation in the history of
warfare and its example does little to illuminate any solution to goods
shortages in the Channel. By contrast, Leningrad was not an armed
confrontations.
And was it easy to fly helicopters into either Leningrad?
Or even fixed-wing aircraft?
Were any local difficulties likely to be encountered?
About as many as in Soviet occupied Berlin.
Post by JNugent
Don't forget: you cited Leningrad as a wartime precedent meaning that
flying in supplies of one class of non-bulky items was impossible or too
difficult in peacetime.
It was such a bad anaolgy that one wonders even now whether you expected
to be taken seriously with it.
I contrasted the seige of Berlin and the Allied airlift broke, which was a
poor anaology on your part, with a true seige in Leningrad which was not
broken.

Can you tell me why Stalingrad is relevant as you brought it up.
JNugent
2019-09-10 13:45:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
On
00:07Ãâ€Ãâ
€¦Ã‚Â
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
¡ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€šÃ‚  6 Sep
Post by JNugent
On
17:48Ãâ€Ãâ
€¦Ã
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚  5
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting
individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might
be - have in (a) international trade policy and (b)
the legal and logistical aspects of import/export
businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs
supply chain expert and he then calculated the ennsuing
mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the
problems of No Deal must have thought he was expert
enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that
medicines would be anything other than the topmost
priority for import (and, for that matter for those
exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily
ensure essential medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These
things are produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly
contractual commercial basis. They are a product of
efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do with the goodwill
or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked
up by the BOAR at the production facility and flown across
the Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if
necessary, a helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution
centre. But I expect there'll be some willing to swear that
only being a member of the EU will enable cargo to be unloaded
even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of
course, know far more than the true experts and always have
cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's
Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your comments.
You're just an observer offering typical pub advice but
mistakenly thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not too
different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief that it
couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed
with far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of
using a helicopter? They were granted £434
million by Boris's lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem
still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs
are not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with
ingenuity (and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might
have after independence are an order or two of magnitude lower
than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or those
ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than
ask me to make it for you.
Can you think of any reason why a wartime siege of Leningrad (you may
mean Stalingrad) might have been more difficult to lift than a mooted
peacetime "siege" of Calais?
No?
Not a single one?
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you
ninny. Leningrad was a seige and so were Odessa or Sevastopol that I
also mentioned.
(1) Berlin was a German seige -- broken by the Allied airlift.
(2) Leningrand was a German seige -- but it was not broken.
Your suggestion is specious that goods can be supplied purely by air if
there's a block on Channel ports by comparing it to what happened in
the biggest airlift in history and one conducted largely by non-British
airplanes.
Maybe you should double check your understanding of war history.
Stalingrad was the biggest armed confrontation in the history of
warfare and its example does little to illuminate any solution to goods
shortages in the Channel. By contrast, Leningrad was not an armed
confrontations.
And was it easy to fly helicopters into either Leningrad?
Or even fixed-wing aircraft?
Were any local difficulties likely to be encountered?
About as many as in Soviet occupied Berlin.
Was the USSR engaged in shooting down Allied military or civilian
aircraft bringing supplies to West Berlin?

I have never heard that before.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Don't forget: you cited Leningrad as a wartime precedent meaning that
flying in supplies of one class of non-bulky items was impossible or too
difficult in peacetime.
It was such a bad anaolgy that one wonders even now whether you expected
to be taken seriously with it.
I contrasted the seige of Berlin and the Allied airlift broke, which was a
poor anaology on your part, with a true seige in Leningrad which was not
broken.
Have you ever heard of weapons of war? Anti-aircraft guns? Medium and
heavy ordnance?

They were in use in the war in Russia.

They were not in use to counter the Berlin Airlift.

Mind you, neither were helicopters.
Post by Pamela
Can you tell me why Stalingrad is relevant as you brought it up.
The siege of Stalingrad was the largest and most bloody in the history
of warfare (four million killed, wounded or captured). See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad

They didn't use helicopters there either.
Pamela
2019-09-10 18:26:14 UTC
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Post by JNugent
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On
00:07ÃÆâ€ââ
€žÂ¢
Post by JNugent
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Post by Pamela
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Post by Pamela
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Post by JNugent
ââ‚Ãâ
€šÃ‚¬Ãƒâ
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€ŠÃ‚Â
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Post by Pamela
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Post by Pamela
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¡ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€Ãâ
€ŠÃ‚¡
Post by JNugent
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Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
  6 Sep
Post by JNugent
On
17:48ÃÆâ€ââ
€ž
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
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Post by JNugent
¢ÃƒÆ’¢â‚Ãâ
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Post by JNugent
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Post by Pamela
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ĉ
€ŠÃ
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Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
‚¡ÃƒÆ’ââ‚
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Post by JNugent
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Post by Pamela
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Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
 ¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚  5
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting
individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they
might be - have in (a) international trade policy
and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs
supply chain expert and he then calculated the
ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the
problems of No Deal must have thought he was expert
enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that
medicines would be anything other than the topmost
priority for import (and, for that matter for those
exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not
necessarily ensure essential medical supplies will be
available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These
things are produced, stored, bought and sold on a
plainly contractual commercial basis. They are a product
of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do with the
goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to
know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be
picked up by the BOAR at the production facility and
flown across the Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if
necessary, a helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution
centre. But I expect there'll be some willing to swear that
only being a member of the EU will enable cargo to be
unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of
course, know far more than the true experts and always have
cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's
Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your
comments. You're just an observer offering typical pub advice
but mistakenly thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not
too different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief
that it couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed
with far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of
using a helicopter? They were granted
£434
million by Boris's lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem
still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs
are not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with
ingenuity (and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might
have after independence are an order or two of magnitude lower
than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or
those ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than
ask me to make it for you.
Can you think of any reason why a wartime siege of Leningrad (you
may mean Stalingrad) might have been more difficult to lift than a
mooted peacetime "siege" of Calais?
No?
Not a single one?
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you
ninny. Leningrad was a seige and so were Odessa or Sevastopol that I
also mentioned.
(1) Berlin was a German seige -- broken by the Allied airlift.
(2) Leningrand was a German seige -- but it was not broken.
Your suggestion is specious that goods can be supplied purely by air
if there's a block on Channel ports by comparing it to what happened
in the biggest airlift in history and one conducted largely by
non-British airplanes.
Maybe you should double check your understanding of war history.
Stalingrad was the biggest armed confrontation in the history of
warfare and its example does little to illuminate any solution to
goods shortages in the Channel. By contrast, Leningrad was not an
armed confrontations.
And was it easy to fly helicopters into either Leningrad?
Or even fixed-wing aircraft?
Were any local difficulties likely to be encountered?
About as many as in Soviet occupied Berlin.
Was the USSR engaged in shooting down Allied military or civilian
aircraft bringing supplies to West Berlin?
I have never heard that before.
Nor me. How did you manage to arrive at such a supposition?
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Don't forget: you cited Leningrad as a wartime precedent meaning that
flying in supplies of one class of non-bulky items was impossible or
too difficult in peacetime.
It was such a bad anaolgy that one wonders even now whether you
expected to be taken seriously with it.
I contrasted the seige of Berlin and the Allied airlift broke, which
was a poor anaology on your part, with a true seige in Leningrad which
was not broken.
Have you ever heard of weapons of war? Anti-aircraft guns? Medium and
heavy ordnance?
They were in use in the war in Russia.
They were not in use to counter the Berlin Airlift.
Mind you, neither were helicopters.
What does AAA have to do with airlifted medical supplies from the EU to
the UK?
Post by JNugent
Can you tell me why Stalingrad is relevant as you brought it up.
The siege of Stalingrad was the largest and most bloody in the history
of warfare
Isn't that exactly what I said to you? Read it again above.
Post by JNugent
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad
They didn't use helicopters there either.
Why did you bring up Stalingrad in the first place, if you now admit there
is little comparison? You appear to be floundering.
JNugent
2019-09-12 10:18:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
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  6 Sep
Post by JNugent
On
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Post by JNugent
…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚  5
Post by JNugent
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk What a disgusting
individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they
might be - have in (a) international trade policy
and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs
supply chain expert and he then calculated the
ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the
problems of No Deal must have thought he was expert
enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that
medicines would be anything other than the topmost
priority for import (and, for that matter for those
exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not
necessarily ensure essential medical supplies will be
available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These
things are produced, stored, bought and sold on a
plainly contractual commercial basis. They are a product
of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do with the
goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to
know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be
picked up by the BOAR at the production facility and
flown across the Chennel to Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
they could land on the main road outside as well
the point is it now has no facilities to unload all the stuff
Medicines aren't bulky and are easily handled. But if
necessary, a helicopter could land at a Tesco distribution
centre. But I expect there'll be some willing to swear that
only being a member of the EU will enable cargo to be
unloaded even there.
I love these cod solutions from bar room experts who, of
course, know far more than the true experts and always have
cotrary advice.
Why not read the BMJ's article on this or the RPS's
Pharmaceutical
Journal to see how they characterise the problem?
What do those august organisations know about lorry docks and
helipcopter (let alone fixed wing aircraft) landing locations?
What do you know about it? Not a lot to judge by your
comments. You're just an observer offering typical pub advice
but mistakenly thinking you are an expert.
Have you ever heard what happened in Berlin, late 1940s?
People like you said it couldn't be done. In factm, people not
too different from you imposed the blockade in the full belief
that it couldn't be done. But it could be, and was, done.
Learn a little history. Any "problems" encountered after the UK
becomes independent (that's if there are any) can be addressed
with far less effort than the problems of Berlin were.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Do you honestly think no one else in the UK has thought of
using a helicopter? They were granted
£434
million by Boris's lickspittle Sajid Javid and the problem
still remains.
So why hasn't it been taken into account?
Because it's too stupid for words. Do you think imported drugs
are not already air freighted? It's a very well establshed and
competitive industry whose capacity has been taken into account.
Berlin, 1948 - 1949.
Now that WAS a logistical problem. But it was tackled with
ingenuity (and courage) and beaten. Any "problems" the UK might
have after independence are an order or two of magnitude lower
than that was.
If it's so easy then why wasn't the years long seige of Leningrad
lifted by the same powers? Or Odessa or Sevastopol for that matter.
Have a little think and see whether you can work that one (or
those ones) out.
Your stance is nonsense and I can not guess what substitutes for
intelligent thought in your mind. Make your own point rather than
ask me to make it for you.
Can you think of any reason why a wartime siege of Leningrad (you
may mean Stalingrad) might have been more difficult to lift than a
mooted peacetime "siege" of Calais?
No?
Not a single one?
Of course I don't mean Stalingrad. Stalingrad wasn't a seige, you
ninny. Leningrad was a seige and so were Odessa or Sevastopol that I
also mentioned.
(1) Berlin was a German seige -- broken by the Allied airlift.
(2) Leningrand was a German seige -- but it was not broken.
Your suggestion is specious that goods can be supplied purely by air
if there's a block on Channel ports by comparing it to what happened
in the biggest airlift in history and one conducted largely by
non-British airplanes.
Maybe you should double check your understanding of war history.
Stalingrad was the biggest armed confrontation in the history of
warfare and its example does little to illuminate any solution to
goods shortages in the Channel. By contrast, Leningrad was not an
armed confrontations.
And was it easy to fly helicopters into either Leningrad?
Or even fixed-wing aircraft?
Were any local difficulties likely to be encountered?
About as many as in Soviet occupied Berlin.
Was the USSR engaged in shooting down Allied military or civilian
aircraft bringing supplies to West Berlin?
I have never heard that before.
Nor me. How did you manage to arrive at such a supposition?
I didn't. But I reasonably assumed you had, since you suggested that
there was some sort of equivalence between trying to fly supplies into a
wartime besieged city and across the English Channel in the 2010s.
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Don't forget: you cited Leningrad as a wartime precedent meaning that
flying in supplies of one class of non-bulky items was impossible or
too difficult in peacetime.
It was such a bad anaolgy that one wonders even now whether you
expected to be taken seriously with it.
I contrasted the seige of Berlin and the Allied airlift broke, which
was a poor anaology on your part, with a true seige in Leningrad which
was not broken.
Have you ever heard of weapons of war? Anti-aircraft guns? Medium and
heavy ordnance?
They were in use in the war in Russia.
They were not in use to counter the Berlin Airlift.
Mind you, neither were helicopters.
What does AAA have to do with airlifted medical supplies from the EU to
the UK?
Exactly!

And why anyone could see any sort of analogy or equivalence between the
two situations is a mystery.
Post by JNugent
Can you tell me why Stalingrad is relevant as you brought it up.
The siege of Stalingrad was the largest and most bloody in the history
of warfare
Isn't that exactly what I said to you? Read it again above.
Post by JNugent
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad
They didn't use helicopters there either.
Why did you bring up Stalingrad in the first place, if you now admit there
is little comparison? You appear to be floundering.
There was plenty of equivalence. Flying in supplies would have been
ideal, had it only been possible and safe.

Keema's Nan
2019-09-06 12:09:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual commercial
basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do
with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
Helicopters could land at GCHQ, but I would like to see one try.
Post by JNugent
If they had to
(they don't), they could land on the apron at Dover Eastern Docks.
JNugent
2019-09-06 15:47:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual commercial
basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do
with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
Helicopters could land at GCHQ, but I would like to see one try.
I saw one land on the A1 at Grantham on Monday.
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by JNugent
If they had to
(they don't), they could land on the apron at Dover Eastern Docks.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-06 15:57:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in
(a) international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical
aspects of import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert
and he then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal
must have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the
work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
Topmost priority post No Deal Brexit does not necessarily ensure
essential
medical supplies will be available.
Neither does membership of the EU "ensure" it. These things are
produced, stored, bought and sold on a plainly contractual commercial
basis. They are a product of efficient capitalism. It's nothing to do
with the goodwill or otherwise of the EU hierarchy.
Is there any import duty on medicines, do you happen to know?
Or VAT?
Any reason why, in an emergency*, stocks cannot be picked up by the
BOAR at the production facility and flown across the Chennel to
Manston by Chinook?
because Manston has closed
Helicopters can land there without slightest difficulty.
Helicopters could land at GCHQ, but I would like to see one try.
I saw one land on the A1 at Grantham on Monday.
I had no idea GCHQ had relocated there.

They kept that secret (but then I suppose that is their job).
Post by JNugent
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by JNugent
If they had to
(they don't), they could land on the apron at Dover Eastern Docks.
Ian Jackson
2019-09-06 07:18:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and their
suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be available.
--
Ian
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
2019-09-06 08:28:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and
their suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be
available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
--
Evremonde
Pamela
2019-09-06 09:24:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and
their suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be
available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European wholesellers
prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries than the UK.

I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by Leave in the
referendum.
Ian Jackson
2019-09-06 09:50:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and
their suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be
available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European wholesellers
prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries than the UK.
Not sure about that. I would expect that the suppliers want to be paid
in euros (or maybe dollars), and a weak pound simply means that these
cost more when we buy them to pay the sellers. Of course, a time might
come when we can't afford them any more.
Post by Pamela
I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by Leave in the
referendum.
"Consequence? What consequence?"
--
Ian
Pamela
2019-09-06 10:27:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
On 09:28 6 Sep 2019, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots
yesterday, collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was
apologising to the person before me that they did not have her
prescription drug, and their suppliers were unable to give any
indication when it might be available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European wholesellers
prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries than the UK.
Not sure about that. I would expect that the suppliers want to be paid
in euros (or maybe dollars), and a weak pound simply means that these
cost more when we buy them to pay the sellers. Of course, a time might
come when we can't afford them any more.
Our purchasing power is reduced by a weak currency. Sellers can get more
money elsewhere. My pharmcist friend tells me this has been happening for
a year or two. I have posted links about this to articles by the
Specialist Pharm Services and the Pharm Services Negotiating Committee.

If you're still stuck, the neurologist who got an apology from Rees-Mogg
and who wrote part of the Yellowhammer reports can probably explain it
better.
Post by Ian Jackson
I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by Leave in
the referendum.
"Consequence? What consequence?"
What don't you understand? Weak pound -> less buying power -> more
profit elsewhere -> shorter supplies here
JNugent
2019-09-06 10:52:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
On 09:28 6 Sep 2019, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots
yesterday, collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was
apologising to the person before me that they did not have her
prescription drug, and their suppliers were unable to give any
indication when it might be available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European wholesellers
prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries than the UK.
Not sure about that. I would expect that the suppliers want to be paid
in euros (or maybe dollars), and a weak pound simply means that these
cost more when we buy them to pay the sellers. Of course, a time might
come when we can't afford them any more.
Our purchasing power is reduced by a weak currency. Sellers can get more
money elsewhere. My pharmcist friend tells me this has been happening for
a year or two. I have posted links about this to articles by the
Specialist Pharm Services and the Pharm Services Negotiating Committee.
If you're still stuck, the neurologist who got an apology from Rees-Mogg
and who wrote part of the Yellowhammer reports can probably explain it
better.
Post by Ian Jackson
I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by Leave in
the referendum.
"Consequence? What consequence?"
What don't you understand? Weak pound -> less buying power -> more
profit elsewhere -> shorter supplies here
That's a silly thing to say, even for you. If we have to pay more
pouinds, in order to get the same number of euros or dollars, the price
receieved by the seller is the same either way. IOW, there isn't any
"more profit elsewhere". That's just arithmetic, though it seems to be
left out of your "calculations".

We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Joe
2019-09-06 13:42:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?

And I've seen it claimed that the zero interest rates of various central
banks is an attempt to lower their currencies against the rest.
--
Joe
R. Mark Clayton
2019-09-06 15:33:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?
And I've seen it claimed that the zero interest rates of various central
banks is an attempt to lower their currencies against the rest.
--
Joe
EU - ECB rate 0% up ~30% against pound
GBP - base rate 0.75%
USD - Fed' reserve rate ~2% up ~25% against the pound

Much of this drop in the value of Sterling has occurred since mide 2016, and rates have hardly changed since then.

Can you think of anything that might have happened mid 2016 that causes an overnight (10 minutes actually) 10% drop in the pound then and an further 10% since?
JNugent
2019-09-06 15:51:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?
Not in the slightest.

Read Friedman on the competing attractions of imports v exports. He
hasn't got much that's good to say about exports.
Post by Joe
And I've seen it claimed that the zero interest rates of various central
banks is an attempt to lower their currencies against the rest.
That is indeed one of its purposes.
Pamela
2019-09-06 17:28:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?
Not in the slightest.
Read Friedman on the competing attractions of imports v exports. He
hasn't got much that's good to say about exports.
What sententious nonsense. My little nephew knows more than this from his
A-level Economics.
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
And I've seen it claimed that the zero interest rates of various central
banks is an attempt to lower their currencies against the rest.
That is indeed one of its purposes.
JNugent
2019-09-06 23:25:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?
Not in the slightest.
Read Friedman on the competing attractions of imports v exports. He
hasn't got much that's good to say about exports.
What sententious nonsense. My little nephew knows more than this from his
A-level Economics.
So what do YOU know about Professor Friedman (Nobel Economics
Prizewinner 1976)?

Did he get the prize for nothing?

On which economic discipline(s) are you - or your little nephew - likely
to be better informed than Milton?
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
And I've seen it claimed that the zero interest rates of various central
banks is an attempt to lower their currencies against the rest.
That is indeed one of its purposes.
Ian Jackson
2019-09-07 07:10:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
So what do YOU know about Professor Friedman (Nobel Economics
Prizewinner 1976)?
Did he get the prize for nothing?
Did Magna Carta die in vain?
--
Ian
Keema's Nan
2019-09-07 08:02:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?
Not in the slightest.
Read Friedman on the competing attractions of imports v exports. He
hasn't got much that's good to say about exports.
What sententious nonsense. My little nephew knows more than this from his
A-level Economics.
So what do YOU know about Professor Friedman (Nobel Economics
Prizewinner 1976)?
Sadly, modern snowflakes and millennials only have to read 'Janet and John
Explain Pocket Money', and they get an A* at A-level Economics.

The point with this is that they can pretend they know everything and then
start a flame war with anyone who criticises. Seems to happen all the time on
social media.
Post by JNugent
Did he get the prize for nothing?
On which economic discipline(s) are you - or your little nephew - likely
to be better informed than Milton?
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
And I've seen it claimed that the zero interest rates of various central
banks is an attempt to lower their currencies against the rest.
That is indeed one of its purposes.
Pamela
2019-09-07 09:28:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for
several different good reasons, one of which is the restoration
of the international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?
Not in the slightest.
Read Friedman on the competing attractions of imports v exports. He
hasn't got much that's good to say about exports.
What sententious nonsense. My little nephew knows more than this from
his A-level Economics.
So what do YOU know about Professor Friedman (Nobel Economics
Prizewinner 1976)?
Sadly, modern snowflakes and millennials only have to read 'Janet and
John Explain Pocket Money', and they get an A* at A-level Economics.
The point with this is that they can pretend they know everything and
then start a flame war with anyone who criticises. Seems to happen all
the time on social media.
You describe Nugent to a tee. His main expertise is as a benefits advisor
but he likes to pronounce on macroeconomics more tha namkes sense.

Universities are churning out economics graduates and yet Nugent feels he
alone has some secret answer.
Joe
2019-09-07 11:03:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 10:28:37 +0100
Post by Pamela
Universities are churning out economics graduates
And...? Are you suggesting that economics is a science? Are you
suggesting that the statements of economists, even experienced ones,
are more useful for forward planning than the predictions of
astrologers? Are you suggesting that new economics graduates know
anything other than what old economics graduates have written and
lectured on?
--
Joe
abelard
2019-09-07 12:26:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 10:28:37 +0100
Post by Pamela
Universities are churning out economics graduates
And...? Are you suggesting that economics is a science? Are you
suggesting that the statements of economists, even experienced ones,
are more useful for forward planning than the predictions of
astrologers? Are you suggesting that new economics graduates know
anything other than what old economics graduates have written and
lectured on?
sadly, s/he knows so little that s/he doesn't even realise those
are questions

should have paid more attention to 'her' ladybird primer
--
www.abelard.org
Pamela
2019-09-07 13:02:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 10:28:37 +0100
Post by Pamela
Universities are churning out economics graduates
And...? Are you suggesting that economics is a science? Are you
suggesting that the statements of economists, even experienced ones,
are more useful for forward planning than the predictions of
astrologers? Are you suggesting that new economics graduates know
anything other than what old economics graduates have written and
lectured on?
That's an interesting rant but would you like to make your point, if you have
one.
Joe
2019-09-07 15:56:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 14:02:25 +0100
Post by Pamela
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 10:28:37 +0100
Post by Pamela
Universities are churning out economics graduates
And...? Are you suggesting that economics is a science? Are you
suggesting that the statements of economists, even experienced ones,
are more useful for forward planning than the predictions of
astrologers? Are you suggesting that new economics graduates know
anything other than what old economics graduates have written and
lectured on?
That's an interesting rant but would you like to make your point, if
you have one.
That it's a bad idea to choose economists as an authority to appeal to.

Is that not obvious?
--
Joe
Pamela
2019-09-07 17:44:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 14:02:25 +0100
Post by Pamela
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 10:28:37 +0100
Post by Pamela
Universities are churning out economics graduates
And...? Are you suggesting that economics is a science? Are you
suggesting that the statements of economists, even experienced ones,
are more useful for forward planning than the predictions of
astrologers? Are you suggesting that new economics graduates know
anything other than what old economics graduates have written and
lectured on?
That's an interesting rant but would you like to make your point, if
you have one.
That it's a bad idea to choose economists as an authority to appeal to.
Perhaps Nugent would like to take note of your advice before suggesting the
putative brilliance of Milton Friedman is definitive.
tim...
2019-09-06 17:02:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 11:52:13 +0100
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
Is the trade gap not telling you that the Pound is overvalued?
No

What it tells us is that interest rates are too low so that "normal" people
can buy more tat than they really need. Most of it imported.
Post by Joe
And I've seen it claimed that the zero interest rates of various central
banks is an attempt to lower their currencies against the rest.
yep

see previous answer

tim
Pamela
2019-09-09 13:13:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
On 09:28 6 Sep 2019, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some
drugs and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots
yesterday, collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was
apologising to the person before me that they did not have her
prescription drug, and their suppliers were unable to give any
indication when it might be available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European
wholesellers prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries than
the UK.
Not sure about that. I would expect that the suppliers want to be paid
in euros (or maybe dollars), and a weak pound simply means that these
cost more when we buy them to pay the sellers. Of course, a time might
come when we can't afford them any more.
Our purchasing power is reduced by a weak currency. Sellers can get
more money elsewhere. My pharmcist friend tells me this has been
happening for a year or two. I have posted links about this to
articles by the Specialist Pharm Services and the Pharm Services
Negotiating Committee.
If you're still stuck, the neurologist who got an apology from
Rees-Mogg and who wrote part of the Yellowhammer reports can probably
explain it better.
Post by Ian Jackson
I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by Leave
in the referendum.
"Consequence? What consequence?"
What don't you understand? Weak pound -> less buying power -> more
profit elsewhere -> shorter supplies here
That's a silly thing to say, even for you. If we have to pay more
pouinds, in order to get the same number of euros or dollars, the price
receieved by the seller is the same either way. IOW, there isn't any
"more profit elsewhere". That's just arithmetic, though it seems to be
left out of your "calculations".
But we don't pay more and that's why we cant afford what we used to.
Margaret Thatcher the grocer's daughter knew that as a child.
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago although
perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial factors mean that
wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it with faux-financial
claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict then your theory needs
adjusting.
JNugent
2019-09-10 02:24:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
On 09:28 6 Sep 2019, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some
drugs and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots
yesterday, collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was
apologising to the person before me that they did not have her
prescription drug, and their suppliers were unable to give any
indication when it might be available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European
wholesellers prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries than
the UK.
Not sure about that. I would expect that the suppliers want to be paid
in euros (or maybe dollars), and a weak pound simply means that these
cost more when we buy them to pay the sellers. Of course, a time might
come when we can't afford them any more.
Our purchasing power is reduced by a weak currency. Sellers can get
more money elsewhere. My pharmcist friend tells me this has been
happening for a year or two. I have posted links about this to
articles by the Specialist Pharm Services and the Pharm Services
Negotiating Committee.
If you're still stuck, the neurologist who got an apology from
Rees-Mogg and who wrote part of the Yellowhammer reports can probably
explain it better.
Post by Ian Jackson
I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by Leave
in the referendum.
"Consequence? What consequence?"
What don't you understand? Weak pound -> less buying power -> more
profit elsewhere -> shorter supplies here
That's a silly thing to say, even for you. If we have to pay more
pouinds, in order to get the same number of euros or dollars, the price
receieved by the seller is the same either way. IOW, there isn't any
"more profit elsewhere". That's just arithmetic, though it seems to be
left out of your "calculations".
But we don't pay more and that's why we cant afford what we used to.
Margaret Thatcher the grocer's daughter knew that as a child.
So you now say that the UK is short of medicines because we can't afford it?

Any actual... er... evidence... for that?
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago although
perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial factors mean that
wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it with faux-financial
claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict then your theory needs
adjusting.
Scaremongering.

Are there no depths the remoaners won't plumb?
Pamela
2019-09-10 08:14:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
On 09:28 6 Sep 2019, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some
drugs and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in
Boots yesterday, collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist
was apologising to the person before me that they did not have
her prescription drug, and their suppliers were unable to give
any indication when it might be available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European
wholesellers prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries
than the UK.
Not sure about that. I would expect that the suppliers want to be
paid in euros (or maybe dollars), and a weak pound simply means that
these cost more when we buy them to pay the sellers. Of course, a
time might come when we can't afford them any more.
Our purchasing power is reduced by a weak currency. Sellers can get
more money elsewhere. My pharmcist friend tells me this has been
happening for a year or two. I have posted links about this to
articles by the Specialist Pharm Services and the Pharm Services
Negotiating Committee.
If you're still stuck, the neurologist who got an apology from
Rees-Mogg and who wrote part of the Yellowhammer reports can probably
explain it better.
Post by Ian Jackson
I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by
Leave in the referendum.
"Consequence? What consequence?"
What don't you understand? Weak pound -> less buying power -> more
profit elsewhere -> shorter supplies here
That's a silly thing to say, even for you. If we have to pay more
pouinds, in order to get the same number of euros or dollars, the
price receieved by the seller is the same either way. IOW, there isn't
any "more profit elsewhere". That's just arithmetic, though it seems
to be left out of your "calculations".
But we don't pay more and that's why we cant afford what we used to.
Margaret Thatcher the grocer's daughter knew that as a child.
So you now say that the UK is short of medicines because we can't afford it?
Any actual... er... evidence... for that?
There have been supply chain problems for medications even without
superimposing the strictures of Brexit onto it.

I referred in this thread to two UK medications agencies which have been
dealing with htis for years. Patients have long noticed that some meds
are in temprary short supply when production output gets being diverted to
other countries. Amongst other factors, the UK failed to increase its
spending on rising generic drug prices and last year the the Public
Accounts Committe gave the DHSC a year end deadline to show that it has a
plan in place to guarantee patient access to their meds and provide robust
systems "to mitigate the impact of price rises on desperately stretched
NHS resources".

Why couldn't you look that up yourself? Google is not complicated.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago
although perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial
factors mean that wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it with
faux-financial claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict then your
theory needs adjusting.
Scaremongering.
Are there no depths the remoaners won't plumb?
It will be fascinating to read the Yellowhammer document when it gets
published following yesterday's humble request. If plans for Brexit were
going so brilliantly well, I wonder why Boris's government repeatedly
refused to show the document to the public.
Norman Wells
2019-09-10 08:44:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago
although perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial
factors mean that wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it with
faux-financial claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict then your
theory needs adjusting.
Scaremongering.
Are there no depths the remoaners won't plumb?
It will be fascinating to read the Yellowhammer document when it gets
published following yesterday's humble request. If plans for Brexit were
going so brilliantly well, I wonder why Boris's government repeatedly
refused to show the document to the public.
Do you publish all your confidential papers?
Pamela
2019-09-10 08:50:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago
although perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial
factors mean that wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it with
faux-financial claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict then your
theory needs adjusting.
Scaremongering.
Are there no depths the remoaners won't plumb?
It will be fascinating to read the Yellowhammer document when it gets
published following yesterday's humble request. If plans for Brexit were
going so brilliantly well, I wonder why Boris's government repeatedly
refused to show the document to the public.
Do you publish all your confidential papers?
Public bodies are subject to the Freedom of Information Act. I am not a
public body.

Last year the govt tried to hide behind spurious FOI public interest
exemptions, so now a formal Parliamentary request has been made.

https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/518428/response/1244308/attach/html/3/
Scan.pdf.html
Norman Wells
2019-09-10 09:15:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago
although perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial
factors mean that wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it with
faux-financial claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict then your
theory needs adjusting.
Scaremongering.
Are there no depths the remoaners won't plumb?
It will be fascinating to read the Yellowhammer document when it gets
published following yesterday's humble request. If plans for Brexit were
going so brilliantly well, I wonder why Boris's government repeatedly
refused to show the document to the public.
Do you publish all your confidential papers?
Public bodies are subject to the Freedom of Information Act. I am not a
public body.
The Freedom of Information Act doesn't require all confidential papers
to be published as a matter of course, though, or even necessarily
provided on request.

Your expectations are therefore wholly unrealistic.
Post by Pamela
Last year the govt tried to hide behind spurious FOI public interest
exemptions, so now a formal Parliamentary request has been made.
There are many exemptions in the FoI Act. Your 'spurious' is someone
else's 'perfectly valid'.
Pamela
2019-09-10 09:25:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pamela
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago
although perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial
factors mean that wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it
with faux-financial claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict
then your theory needs adjusting.
Scaremongering.
Are there no depths the remoaners won't plumb?
It will be fascinating to read the Yellowhammer document when it gets
published following yesterday's humble request. If plans for Brexit
were going so brilliantly well, I wonder why Boris's government
repeatedly refused to show the document to the public.
Do you publish all your confidential papers?
Public bodies are subject to the Freedom of Information Act. I am not
a public body.
The Freedom of Information Act doesn't require all confidential papers
to be published as a matter of course, though, or even necessarily
provided on request.
Your expectations are therefore wholly unrealistic.
Why did you omit to quote this link about a formal request made last year
under the FOI? Is Boris's dishonesty rubbing off on you or have you always
enegaged in dishonest quoting?

https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/518428/response/1244308/attach/html/3/
Scan.pdf.html

https://tinyurl.com/yellowhammer-FOI
JNugent
2019-09-10 10:41:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
On 09:28 6 Sep 2019, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Ian Jackson
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some
drugs and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in
Boots yesterday, collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist
was apologising to the person before me that they did not have
her prescription drug, and their suppliers were unable to give
any indication when it might be available.
Ah, must be Brexit. It's surely never happened before.
The weak pound on account of the Brexit vote means European
wholesellers prefer to sell limited supplies to other countries
than the UK.
Not sure about that. I would expect that the suppliers want to be
paid in euros (or maybe dollars), and a weak pound simply means that
these cost more when we buy them to pay the sellers. Of course, a
time might come when we can't afford them any more.
Our purchasing power is reduced by a weak currency. Sellers can get
more money elsewhere. My pharmcist friend tells me this has been
happening for a year or two. I have posted links about this to
articles by the Specialist Pharm Services and the Pharm Services
Negotiating Committee.
If you're still stuck, the neurologist who got an apology from
Rees-Mogg and who wrote part of the Yellowhammer reports can probably
explain it better.
Post by Ian Jackson
I wonder why such a predictable consequence wasn't mentioned by
Leave in the referendum.
"Consequence? What consequence?"
What don't you understand? Weak pound -> less buying power -> more
profit elsewhere -> shorter supplies here
That's a silly thing to say, even for you. If we have to pay more
pouinds, in order to get the same number of euros or dollars, the
price receieved by the seller is the same either way. IOW, there isn't
any "more profit elsewhere". That's just arithmetic, though it seems
to be left out of your "calculations".
But we don't pay more and that's why we cant afford what we used to.
Margaret Thatcher the grocer's daughter knew that as a child.
So you now say that the UK is short of medicines because we can't afford it?
Any actual... er... evidence... for that?
There have been supply chain problems for medications even without
superimposing the strictures of Brexit onto it.
Just re-read what you wrote there.
Post by Pamela
I referred in this thread to two UK medications agencies which have been
dealing with htis for years. Patients have long noticed that some meds
are in temprary short supply when production output gets being diverted to
other countries. Amongst other factors, the UK failed to increase its
spending on rising generic drug prices and last year the the Public
Accounts Committe gave the DHSC a year end deadline to show that it has a
plan in place to guarantee patient access to their meds and provide robust
systems "to mitigate the impact of price rises on desperately stretched
NHS resources".
Why couldn't you look that up yourself? Google is not complicated.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
We URGENTLY require a normalisation of interest rates, for several
different good reasons, one of which is the restoration of the
international value of the pound.
I have been talking about the lack of meds after No Deal Brexit as
described in Yellowhammer. This started happening some time ago
although perhaps you will now assure us that some fake financial
factors mean that wasn't actually happening and you reinterpret it with
faux-financial claptrap. When facts and your theory conflict then your
theory needs adjusting.
Scaremongering.
Are there no depths the remoaners won't plumb?
It will be fascinating to read the Yellowhammer document when it gets
published following yesterday's humble request. If plans for Brexit were
going so brilliantly well, I wonder why Boris's government repeatedly
refused to show the document to the public.
Negotiation. It cannot be done in a goldfish bowl.
tim...
2019-09-06 09:17:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that matter
for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs and
medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?).
No

It's apparently because we negotiated such a good deal (on price) that the
suppliers supply us last, after all the people prepared to pay more

tim
abelard
2019-09-06 10:33:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 08:18:57 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and their
suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be available.
for more expensive medicines it is normal to have to order
them ahead as chemists don't want to carry expensive stock

i expect all you ever 'buy' is aspirins and dirt cheap antibiotics

i expect pammy to be dumb...i expect very slightly better from you!
--
www.abelard.org
tim...
2019-09-06 11:53:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 08:18:57 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and their
suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be available.
for more expensive medicines it is normal to have to order
them ahead as chemists don't want to carry expensive stock
chemists have daily supplies from wholesalers

if the chemist has no stock you will be told, they'll be here by this
afternoon (or tomorrow if you've missed the days delivery)

The shortages being referred to here are at the wholesaler, not the chemist
store

tim
abelard
2019-09-06 12:03:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by abelard
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 08:18:57 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and their
suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be available.
for more expensive medicines it is normal to have to order
them ahead as chemists don't want to carry expensive stock
chemists have daily supplies from wholesalers
if the chemist has no stock you will be told, they'll be here by this
afternoon (or tomorrow if you've missed the days delivery)
The shortages being referred to here are at the wholesaler, not the chemist
store
i've no idea...i didn't meet the customer...i didn't talk to the
pharmacy owner...

some drugs cost over £10,000 per annum...even a wholesaler
will not stock that casually

direct supply from a manufacture is more likely
--
www.abelard.org
JNugent
2019-09-06 15:49:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by abelard
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 08:18:57 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
 Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
 The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No
Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and their
suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be available.
for more expensive medicines it is normal to have to order
   them ahead as chemists don't want to carry expensive stock
chemists have daily supplies from wholesalers
if the chemist has no stock you will be told, they'll be here by this
afternoon (or tomorrow if you've missed the days delivery)
The shortages being referred to here are at the wholesaler, not the
chemist store
I've had to go from pharmacy to pharmacy for a (particular) prescribed
drug before now. Being in the EU didn't make it any easier to find.
Incubus
2019-09-06 16:22:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by abelard
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 08:18:57 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
 Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
 The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No
Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and their
suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be available.
for more expensive medicines it is normal to have to order
   them ahead as chemists don't want to carry expensive stock
chemists have daily supplies from wholesalers
if the chemist has no stock you will be told, they'll be here by this
afternoon (or tomorrow if you've missed the days delivery)
The shortages being referred to here are at the wholesaler, not the
chemist store
I've had to go from pharmacy to pharmacy for a (particular) prescribed
drug before now. Being in the EU didn't make it any easier to find.
Indeed, I have had a similar experience.

Some drugs have a short shelf life and must be kept refrigerated, which could
present additional complications (although this is not an example from
experience). I would assume that controlled substances, although subject to
strict checks, would not be affected per se as those checks don't present a
supply issue.
abelard
2019-09-06 17:09:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 16:22:27 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Post by JNugent
Post by tim...
Post by abelard
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 08:18:57 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
 Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain
expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
 The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No
Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
I understand that there are already reports of shortages of some drugs
and medicines (possibly due to stockpiling?). I was in Boots yesterday,
collecting a prescription, and the pharmacist was apologising to the
person before me that they did not have her prescription drug, and their
suppliers were unable to give any indication when it might be available.
for more expensive medicines it is normal to have to order
   them ahead as chemists don't want to carry expensive stock
chemists have daily supplies from wholesalers
if the chemist has no stock you will be told, they'll be here by this
afternoon (or tomorrow if you've missed the days delivery)
The shortages being referred to here are at the wholesaler, not the
chemist store
I've had to go from pharmacy to pharmacy for a (particular) prescribed
drug before now. Being in the EU didn't make it any easier to find.
Indeed, I have had a similar experience.
Some drugs have a short shelf life and must be kept refrigerated, which could
present additional complications (although this is not an example from
experience). I would assume that controlled substances, although subject to
strict checks, would not be affected per se as those checks don't present a
supply issue.
there are also radiation products that (of course)
deteriorate over time...

they are used for things like mris...naturally they have
to be coordinated with appointments
--
www.abelard.org
R. Mark Clayton
2019-09-06 12:02:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
?????
What expertise do doctors - however eminent they might be - have in (a)
international trade policy and (b) the legal and logistical aspects of
import/export businesses?
Which medical schools specialise in such matters?
Presumably Dr David Nicholl was advised by a drugs supply chain expert and he
then calculated the ennsuing mortality rates from the shortage.
The civil servants advising the government on the problems of No Deal must
have thought he was expert enough and commissioned him to do the work.
But what a twisted conclusion it is to decide that medicines would be
anything other than the topmost priority for import (and, for that
matter for those exporting them).
They can have any priority you like, but if they are stuck in a truck 50km from Calais on the A26 it won't matter.
Grikbasshar®™
2019-09-05 16:50:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 5 Sep 2019 17:25:12 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
Most NHS consultants are.
Peeler
2019-09-05 17:32:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 05 Sep 2019 09:50:54 -0700, clinically insane, pedophilic, serbian
bitch Razovic, the resident psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous
Post by Grikbasshar®™
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
Most NHS consultants are.
I have yet to meet an individual as disgusting as you are, pedophilic gay
Razovic!
--
Pedophilic dreckserb Razovic arguing in favour of pedophilia, again:
"That [referring to the term "consenting adults"] is just an outdated legal
construct. Are you telling me that a 13-year old who spends 15 hours a day
on Facebook is incapable of consent?"
MID: <Og0VE.1298131$***@usenetxs.com>
abelard
2019-09-05 16:58:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 5 Sep 2019 17:25:12 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
the bastard...why on earth should he be allowed to tell the truth...

we must stop truth in politics...how on else can agent cob bring
in the people's paradise if people are allowed to talk
sense!!
--
www.abelard.org
The Todal
2019-09-06 08:39:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
Mogg has now issued an apology to the doctor, as minimal an apology as
he thought he could get away with. But Mogg's reputation for courtesy
and impartiality has surely been shot to ribbons.

quote

Finally, on Thursday evening, Rees-Mogg caved in to the pressure and
released a statement that read: “I apologise to Dr Nicholl for the
comparison with Dr Wakefield. I have the utmost respect for all of the
country’s hardworking medical professionals and the work they do in
caring for the people of this country.

“The government is working closely with the NHS, industry and
distributors to help ensure the supply of medicine and medical products
remains uninterrupted once we leave the EU on 31 October, whatever the
circumstances.”

Afterwards, Nicholl tweeted that he accepted the apology. He said of
Rees-Mogg: “Hopefully he will reflect on his choice of words better the
next time. I would be grateful if he could address this in the [House of
Commons], where his comments were first made.”
R. Mark Clayton
2019-09-06 12:33:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Todal
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
Mogg has now issued an apology to the doctor, as minimal an apology as
he thought he could get away with. But Mogg's reputation for courtesy
and impartiality has surely been shot to ribbons.
quote
Finally, on Thursday evening, Rees-Mogg caved in to the pressure and
released a statement that read: “I apologise to Dr Nicholl for the
comparison with Dr Wakefield. I have the utmost respect for all of the
country’s hardworking medical professionals and the work they do in
caring for the people of this country.
“The government is working closely with the NHS, industry and
distributors to help ensure the supply of medicine and medical products
remains uninterrupted once we leave the EU on 31 October, whatever the
circumstances.”
Afterwards, Nicholl tweeted that he accepted the apology. He said of
Rees-Mogg: “Hopefully he will reflect on his choice of words better the
next time. I would be grateful if he could address this in the [House of
Commons], where his comments were first made.”
Pity Mogg made a mistake in his apology.

In Wakefield's case he was accorded the courtesy title of doctor by virtue of being a practising medical practitioner - since being struck off he should be titled Mr. Wakefield.
Norman Wells
2019-09-06 13:51:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by The Todal
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
Mogg has now issued an apology to the doctor, as minimal an apology as
he thought he could get away with. But Mogg's reputation for courtesy
and impartiality has surely been shot to ribbons.
quote
Finally, on Thursday evening, Rees-Mogg caved in to the pressure and
released a statement that read: “I apologise to Dr Nicholl for the
comparison with Dr Wakefield. I have the utmost respect for all of the
country’s hardworking medical professionals and the work they do in
caring for the people of this country.
“The government is working closely with the NHS, industry and
distributors to help ensure the supply of medicine and medical products
remains uninterrupted once we leave the EU on 31 October, whatever the
circumstances.”
Afterwards, Nicholl tweeted that he accepted the apology. He said of
Rees-Mogg: “Hopefully he will reflect on his choice of words better the
next time. I would be grateful if he could address this in the [House of
Commons], where his comments were first made.”
Pity Mogg made a mistake in his apology.
In Wakefield's case he was accorded the courtesy title of doctor by virtue of being a practising medical practitioner - since being struck off he should be titled Mr. Wakefield.
Like a consultant, you mean?
R. Mark Clayton
2019-09-06 15:56:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by The Todal
Post by Ian Jackson
https://tinyurl.com/y3rmzxbk
What a disgusting individual he is.
Mogg has now issued an apology to the doctor, as minimal an apology as
he thought he could get away with. But Mogg's reputation for courtesy
and impartiality has surely been shot to ribbons.
quote
Finally, on Thursday evening, Rees-Mogg caved in to the pressure and
released a statement that read: “I apologise to Dr Nicholl for the
comparison with Dr Wakefield. I have the utmost respect for all of the
country’s hardworking medical professionals and the work they do in
caring for the people of this country.
“The government is working closely with the NHS, industry and
distributors to help ensure the supply of medicine and medical products
remains uninterrupted once we leave the EU on 31 October, whatever the
circumstances.”
Afterwards, Nicholl tweeted that he accepted the apology. He said of
Rees-Mogg: “Hopefully he will reflect on his choice of words better the
next time. I would be grateful if he could address this in the [House of
Commons], where his comments were first made.”
Pity Mogg made a mistake in his apology.
In Wakefield's case he was accorded the courtesy title of doctor by virtue of being a practising medical practitioner - since being struck off he should be titled Mr. Wakefield.
Like a consultant, you mean?
That depends on whether they are surgeons or not. Your consultant is probably still Dr.

Oddly goes back to the days of barber surgeons, who were not doctors.
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