Discussion:
Migration into Britain is on the increase
Add Reply
The Todal
2018-11-29 21:15:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?

From today's Times:

Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high

UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the figure
from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.

Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.

Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
migration as “astonishing”.

Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and
EU net migration was 74,000.
Pamela
2018-11-30 00:14:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
migration as “astonishing”.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000
and EU net migration was 74,000.
Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working in
the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from another
continent and another culture.

We will get more of this after Brexit.
Burton
2018-11-30 00:22:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ?astonishing? 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
migration as ?astonishing?.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
government?s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000
and EU net migration was 74,000.
Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working in
the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from another
continent and another culture.
You are not old fashioned, you are racist.
Pamela
2018-11-30 00:39:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Burton
Post by Pamela
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ?astonishing? 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from
outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU
net migration as ?astonishing?.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
the government?s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working
in the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from
another continent and another culture.
You are not old fashioned, you are racist.
It's not their race I don't like but their culture which is that from
another continent. Their mannerisms too. I also find strange religions
disconcerting.

I don't hold a particular prejudice against non-Europeans but I find it
annoying to accomodate their different way of life especially when it's
being brought to me in my home country.

They're probably perfectly nice people but their ways are too different
for me. I'm not really looking for a culturally enriching experience on
my doorstep. YMMV.
Fredxx
2018-11-30 00:54:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Burton
Post by Pamela
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ?astonishing? 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from
outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU
net migration as ?astonishing?.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
the government?s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working
in the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from
another continent and another culture.
You are not old fashioned, you are racist.
It's not their race I don't like but their culture which is that from
another continent. Their mannerisms too. I also find strange religions
disconcerting.
I don't hold a particular prejudice against non-Europeans but I find it
annoying to accomodate their different way of life especially when it's
being brought to me in my home country.
They're probably perfectly nice people but their ways are too different
for me. I'm not really looking for a culturally enriching experience on
my doorstep. YMMV.
You do have a blatantly racist attitude. I could have guessed when you
were happy for Eastern Europeans to do menial types of work for minimum
pay. It seems a common trait with Remainers.
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
2018-11-30 08:17:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Fredxx
Post by Pamela
They're probably perfectly nice people but their ways are too different
for me. I'm not really looking for a culturally enriching experience on
my doorstep. YMMV.
You do have a blatantly racist attitude. I could have guessed when you
were happy for Eastern Europeans to do menial types of work for minimum
pay. It seems a common trait with Remainers.
It's because they are so intelligent and well educated. Those qualities
go with being a racist exploiter of cheap labour.
--
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Bod
2018-11-30 08:46:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Fredxx
 They're probably perfectly nice people but their ways are too different
for me.  I'm not really looking for a culturally enriching experience on
my doorstep.  YMMV.
You do have a blatantly racist attitude. I could have guessed when you
were happy for Eastern Europeans to do menial types of work for
minimum pay. It seems a common trait with Remainers.
It's because they are so intelligent and well educated. Those qualities
go with being a racist exploiter of cheap labour.
If you mean the 'minimum wage', millions of home grown Brits are
earning that amount.
Migrants come here of their own accord and most are grateful that
they can earn several times what they were earning in their home country.
Many can't even get work in their own country.

What exactly are you failing to say?
--
Bod
BurfordTJustice
2018-11-30 11:06:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
How many have you taken into help and support?


You always jump up to defend the browns and blacks...

You are a racist pig against all others


"Bod" <***@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:***@mid.individual.net...
: On 30/11/2018 08:17, The Marquis Saint Evremonde wrote:
: > Fredxx <***@nospam.com> posted
: >> On 30/11/2018 00:39, Pamela wrote:
: >>> They're probably perfectly nice people but their ways are too
different
: >>> for me. I'm not really looking for a culturally enriching experience
on
: >>> my doorstep. YMMV.
: >>
: >> You do have a blatantly racist attitude. I could have guessed when you
: >> were happy for Eastern Europeans to do menial types of work for
: >> minimum pay. It seems a common trait with Remainers.
: >
: > It's because they are so intelligent and well educated. Those qualities
: > go with being a racist exploiter of cheap labour.
: >
: > If you mean the 'minimum wage', millions of home grown Brits are
: earning that amount.
: Migrants come here of their own accord and most are grateful that
: they can earn several times what they were earning in their home country.
: Many can't even get work in their own country.
:
: What exactly are you failing to say?
:
: --
: Bod
Pamela
2018-11-30 11:24:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Fredxx
Post by Pamela
Post by Burton
Post by Pamela
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ?astonishing? 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from
outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU
net migration as ?astonishing?.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
the government?s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working
in the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from
another continent and another culture.
You are not old fashioned, you are racist.
It's not their race I don't like but their culture which is that from
another continent. Their mannerisms too. I also find strange
religions disconcerting.
I don't hold a particular prejudice against non-Europeans but I find
it annoying to accomodate their different way of life especially when
it's being brought to me in my home country.
They're probably perfectly nice people but their ways are too
different for me. I'm not really looking for a culturally enriching
experience on my doorstep. YMMV.
You do have a blatantly racist attitude. I could have guessed when you
were happy for Eastern Europeans to do menial types of work for
minimum pay. It seems a common trait with Remainers.
The alleged racism you claim extends to thinking East Europeans are
great and are most welcome to work here. There's a logic failure in
your head.

I like Chinese people and I don't particularly like Indian people. But
I don't think we should have more of either to replace European workers.

By your skewed definition, it is you who is racist by not wanting
specifically European workers in the UK. Personally I wish they could
stay after but you want them out.

You have personally scored an own goal by supporting Brexit in order to
get rid of job competition in the middle market where you work. Instead
the last plan is to reduce the number of workers doing manual or basic
work and increase the number of those from places like India which will
compete for your type of work. You must be slapping your forehead at
your stupidity. lol
BurfordTJustice
2018-11-30 11:37:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
but just above you said:
"Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working in
the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from another
continent and another culture. "

So do you like the Chicoms or not?
Which time did you lie?


"Pamela" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message

: I like Chinese people and I don't particularly like Indian people.
BurfordTJustice
2018-11-30 11:05:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You are a racist pig!





"Pamela" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message news:***@81.171.118.178...
: On 00:22 30 Nov 2018, Burton <***@france.com> wrote in
: news:***@reader443.eternal-september.org:
:
: > In article <***@81.171.92.183>,
: > ***@gmail.com says...
: >>
: >> On 21:15 29 Nov 2018, The Todal <***@icloud.com> wrote in
: >> news:***@mid.individual.net:
: >>
: >> > Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
: >> >
: >> > From today's Times:
: >> >
: >> > Net migration from non-EU countries hits ?astonishing? 14-year high
: >> >
: >> > UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
: >> > figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
: >> >
: >> > Official figures published today show that net migration from
: >> > outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
: >> > level in 14 years.
: >> >
: >> > Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU
: >> > net migration as ?astonishing?.
: >> >
: >> > Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
: >> > the government?s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
: >> > 248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
: >>
: >> Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working
: >> in the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from
: >> another continent and another culture.
: >
: > You are not old fashioned, you are racist.
:
: It's not their race I don't like but their culture which is that from
: another continent. Their mannerisms too. I also find strange religions
: disconcerting.
:
: I don't hold a particular prejudice against non-Europeans but I find it
: annoying to accomodate their different way of life especially when it's
: being brought to me in my home country.
:
: They're probably perfectly nice people but their ways are too different
: for me. I'm not really looking for a culturally enriching experience on
: my doorstep. YMMV.
BurfordTJustice
2018-11-30 11:04:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You racist pig!



"Pamela" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message news:***@81.171.92.183...
: On 21:15 29 Nov 2018, The Todal <***@icloud.com> wrote in
: news:***@mid.individual.net:
:
: > Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
: >
: > From today's Times:
: >
: > Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
: >
: > UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
: > figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
: >
: > Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
: > the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14
: > years.
: >
: > Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
: > migration as “astonishing”.
: >
: > Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
: > government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000
: > and EU net migration was 74,000.
:
: Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working in
: the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from another
: continent and another culture.
:
: We will get more of this after Brexit.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-11-30 12:59:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
migration as “astonishing”.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000
and EU net migration was 74,000.
Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working in
the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from another
continent and another culture.
We will get more of this after Brexit.
What I don't get is if the government's target was 100,000 how come
almost 3 times as many were alllowed in? What happened to border
controls???

And why doesn't 248,000 and 74,000 add up to 273,000?
The Peeler
2018-11-30 14:44:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Nov 2018 04:59:50 -0800, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Pamela
Call me old fashioned but I would far rather have Europeans working in
the UK rather than those from China, India or wherever from another
continent and another culture.
We will get more of this after Brexit.
What I don't get is if the government's target was 100,000 how come
almost 3 times as many were alllowed in? What happened to border
controls???
And why doesn't 248,000 and 74,000 add up to 273,000?
What I don't get is why haven't the Brits yet extradited you filthy
dreckserb? Is your Brit passport SUCH a good forgery, Razovic?
--
The Jews addressing dumb anal Razovic:
"You're in a constant STATE of panic, aren't you Gordon?"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
Nightjar
2018-11-30 09:12:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the figure
from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
migration as “astonishing”.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and
EU net migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking. The post war
baby boomers are retiring a lot faster than the 21st century children
are entering the labour market.
--
--

Colin Bignell
Paul Pot
2018-11-30 09:53:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from
outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU
net migration as “astonishing”.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
the government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking. The post
war baby boomers are retiring a lot faster than the 21st century
children are entering the labour market.
Why don't we encourage our native Brits to have more children? A tax
break perhaps? It's nonesense that we need more immigrants all the
time.
--
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
Nightjar
2018-11-30 11:40:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Pot
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
migration as “astonishing”.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000
and EU net migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking. The post
war baby boomers are retiring a lot faster than the 21st century
children are entering the labour market.
Why don't we encourage our native Brits to have more children? A tax
break perhaps? It's nonesense that we need more immigrants all the time.
Not exactly a fast answer to the problem and we have retirements from
the 1960s birth peak boom looming.
--
--

Colin Bignell
Ian Jackson
2018-11-30 13:13:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Pot
Why don't we encourage our native Brits to have more children? A tax
break perhaps? It's nonesense that we need more immigrants all the time.
Jacob Rees-Mogg immediately comes to mind. He's certainly doing his best
to reduce the need for immigration.
--
Ian
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
2018-11-30 16:47:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the
figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from
outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU
net migration as “astonishing”.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
the government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working short
hours or no hours at all?
Post by Nightjar
The post war baby boomers are retiring a lot faster than the 21st
century children are entering the labour market.
--
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Pamela
2018-12-01 18:37:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits astonishing 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite
the figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six
years. Official figures published today show that net migration
from outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its
highest level in 14 years. Campaigners for lower immigration
described the figure for non-EU net migration as astonishing.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
the government's target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working short
hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours to
just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. Those working no hours
at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our economy needs
filling but can't find.
JNugent
2018-12-04 14:44:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits astonishing 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite
the figure from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six
years. Official figures published today show that net migration
from outside the bloc, which government can control, is at its
highest level in 14 years. Campaigners for lower immigration
described the figure for non-EU net migration as astonishing.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding
the government's target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working short
hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours to
just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. Those working no hours
at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our economy needs
filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will tell you
that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for part-time jobs
for 16 hours a week.

This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system. Perhaps,
for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be revalorised so as to
more nearly coincide with what the average bloke would recognise as a
full time job.
Pamela
2018-12-04 14:59:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU countries hits
astonishing 14-year high UK net migration is running at almost
275,000 a year, despite the figure from the EU falling to its
lowest level in nearly six years. Official figures published
today show that net migration from outside the bloc, which
government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for
non-EU net migration as astonishing. Overall, net migration in
the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the government's target
of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and EU net
migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours to
just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. Those working no
hours at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our
economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will tell you
that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for part-time jobs
for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be revalorised
so as to more nearly coincide with what the average bloke would
recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working Tax but

I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted to work no more
than a modest number of hours but wanted a better hourly rate to
compensate for the limited time worked.

Must be that pesky British Disease.
JNugent
2018-12-04 16:06:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU countries hits
astonishing 14-year high UK net migration is running at almost
275,000 a year, despite the figure from the EU falling to its
lowest level in nearly six years. Official figures published
today show that net migration from outside the bloc, which
government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for
non-EU net migration as astonishing. Overall, net migration in
the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the government's target
of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and EU net
migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours to
just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. Those working no
hours at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our
economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will tell you
that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for part-time jobs
for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be revalorised
so as to more nearly coincide with what the average bloke would
recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working Tax but
I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted to work no more
than a modest number of hours but wanted a better hourly rate to
compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not less) is
regarded, for social security purposes, as being in full-time work. That
also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal Credit) purposes.
Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly rate, but restricting
their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can get the earnings topped up
to the Tax Credit scale rates as though they were a real full-time worker.

As a system, it stinks.

Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper full-time
jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal Credits more
than an additional 50% of what they earn in their "full time" job.
Pamela
2018-12-04 16:47:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47 30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU countries hits
astonishing 14-year high UK net migration is running at
almost 275,000 a year, despite the figure from the EU
falling to its lowest level in nearly six years. Official
figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
level in 14 years. Campaigners for lower immigration
described the figure for non-EU net migration as
astonishing. Overall, net migration in the year to June was
273,000, exceeding the government's target of 100,000.
Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and EU net migration was
74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours
to just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. Those working no
hours at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our
economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will tell
you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for
part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be
revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the average
bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working Tax
but I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted to work
no more than a modest number of hours but wanted a better hourly rate
to compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not less) is
regarded, for social security purposes, as being in full-time work.
That also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal Credit) purposes.
Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly rate, but restricting
their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can get the earnings topped up
to the Tax Credit scale rates as though they were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal
Credits more than an additional 50% of what they earn in their "full
time" job.
Thanks for the info.

maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other benefit
(ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not reduce the
amount received of the other benefit although working more would?
JNugent
2018-12-05 01:39:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47 30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU countries hits
astonishing 14-year high UK net migration is running at
almost 275,000 a year, despite the figure from the EU
falling to its lowest level in nearly six years. Official
figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
level in 14 years. Campaigners for lower immigration
described the figure for non-EU net migration as
astonishing. Overall, net migration in the year to June was
273,000, exceeding the government's target of 100,000.
Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and EU net migration was
74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours
to just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. Those working no
hours at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our
economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will tell
you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for
part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be
revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the average
bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working Tax
but I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted to work
no more than a modest number of hours but wanted a better hourly rate
to compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not less) is
regarded, for social security purposes, as being in full-time work.
That also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal Credit) purposes.
Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly rate, but restricting
their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can get the earnings topped up
to the Tax Credit scale rates as though they were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal
Credits more than an additional 50% of what they earn in their "full
time" job.
Thanks for the info.
maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other benefit
(ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not reduce the
amount received of the other benefit although working more would?
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It simply
marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work for social
security purposes.

Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance of
PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more than
those sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential benefit
receipt whilst limiting the amount of effort they have to make.
JNugent
2018-12-05 01:44:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47  30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
    From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU countries hits
    astonishing 14-year high UK net migration is running at
    almost 275,000 a year, despite the figure  from the EU
    falling to its lowest level in nearly six years. Official
    figures published today show that net migration from outside
    the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest
    level in 14  years. Campaigners for lower immigration
    described the figure for non-EU net  migration as
    astonishing. Overall, net migration in the year to June was
    273,000, exceeding the  government's target of 100,000.
    Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and  EU net migration was
    74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours
to just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit.  Those working no
hours at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our
economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will tell
you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for
part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be
revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the average
bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working Tax
but I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted to work
no more than a modest number of hours but wanted a better hourly rate
to compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not less) is
regarded, for social security purposes, as being in full-time work.
That also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal Credit) purposes.
Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly rate, but restricting
their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can get the earnings topped up
to the Tax Credit scale rates as though they were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal
Credits more than an additional 50% of what they earn in their "full
time" job.
Thanks for the info.
maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other benefit
(ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not reduce the
amount received of the other benefit although working more would?
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It simply
marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work for social
security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance of
PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more than
those sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential benefit
receipt whilst limiting the amount of effort they have to make.
Errata:

"course"

"prevalence"
kat
2018-12-05 08:35:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It simply marks
the boundary between part-time and full-time work for social security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance of PT
work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more than those
sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential benefit receipt whilst
limiting the amount of effort they have to make.
"course"
"prevalence"
And let us not forget that many people just don't want or need to work full
time. They aren't all wanting to optimise benefits, they aren't all entitled to
benefits. Part time work is better suited to their life situation.

Take my daughter for example, in a job share. She works 3 days a week the other
girl 2. They earn rather more than minimum wage, indeed my daughter earns more
in three days than her husband does in five. She has toddlers and spends time
with them as well as working. Once they are at school she might prefer to work
five short days. I know quite a few women of her age working around those 16
hours because it adds to the family income, gives them something to do, keeps a
career on track, but fits with other responsibilities. The same can apply to
men! Part time work is a good thing for many people,
--
kat
Post by JNugent
^..^<
JNugent
2018-12-05 15:15:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by kat
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It
simply marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work for
social security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance
of PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more
than those sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential
benefit receipt whilst limiting the amount of effort they have to make.
"course"
"prevalence"
And let us not forget that many people just don't want or need to work
full time. They aren't all wanting to optimise benefits, they aren't all
entitled to benefits.  Part time work is better suited to their life
situation.
i hadn't forgotten that because it isn't relevant. I know as well as you
do that part-time work has a valid and constructive part to play in the
lives of many people, where part-time fits in with their other
commitments. This compares with hours being artificially limited in
order to game the benefits system.

I (occasionally work now after retirement, but nowhere near 16 hours a
week. However, this is not connected with benefits. I pay income tax out
of my self-employed income.
Post by kat
Take my daughter for example, in a job share.  She works 3 days a week
the other girl 2.  They earn rather more than minimum wage, indeed my
daughter earns more in three days than her husband does in five.  She
has toddlers and spends time with them as well as working.  Once they
are at school she might prefer to work five short days. I know quite a
few women of her age working around those 16 hours because it adds to
the family income, gives them something to do, keeps a career on track,
but fits with other responsibilities.  The same can apply to men!  Part
time work is a good thing for many people,
Quite so.

It is that sort of situation which is being used as a smoke-scren by the
16 hours brigade.
Pamela
2018-12-05 10:44:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47  30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
    From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU
countries hits     astonishing 14-year high UK net
migration is running at     almost 275,000 a year, despite
the figure  from the EU     falling to its lowest level
in nearly six years. Official     figures published today
show that net migration from outside     the bloc, which
government can control, is at its highest     level in
14  years. Campaigners for lower immigration    
described the figure for non-EU net  migration as
    astonishing. Overall, net migration in the year to
June was     273,000, exceeding the  government's target
of 100,000.     Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and 
EU net migration was     74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short
hours to just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit.  Those
working no hours at all are presumably not interested in the
many jobs our economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will
tell you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for
part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be
revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the average
bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working
Tax but I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted
to work no more than a modest number of hours but wanted a better
hourly rate to compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not less)
is regarded, for social security purposes, as being in full-time
work. That also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal Credit)
purposes. Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly rate, but
restricting their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can get the
earnings topped up to the Tax Credit scale rates as though they
were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal
Credits more than an additional 50% of what they earn in their
"full time" job.
Thanks for the info.
maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other benefit
(ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not reduce the
amount received of the other benefit although working more would?
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It
simply marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work for
social security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance
of PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more
than those sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential
benefit receipt whilst limiting the amount of effort they have to
make.
"course"
"prevalence"
Why, thank you kindly sir.

The first is miskeying, the second is ignorance.
JNugent
2018-12-05 15:16:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47  30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
    From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU
countries hits     astonishing 14-year high UK net
migration is running at     almost 275,000 a year, despite
the figure  from the EU     falling to its lowest level
in nearly six years. Official     figures published today
show that net migration from outside     the bloc, which
government can control, is at its highest     level in
14  years. Campaigners for lower immigration   Â
described the figure for non-EU net  migration as
    astonishing. Overall, net migration in the year to
June was     273,000, exceeding the  government's target
of 100,000.     Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 andÂ
EU net migration was     74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short
hours to just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit.  Those
working no hours at all are presumably not interested in the
many jobs our economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will
tell you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for
part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be
revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the average
bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working
Tax but I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted
to work no more than a modest number of hours but wanted a better
hourly rate to compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not less)
is regarded, for social security purposes, as being in full-time
work. That also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal Credit)
purposes. Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly rate, but
restricting their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can get the
earnings topped up to the Tax Credit scale rates as though they
were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal
Credits more than an additional 50% of what they earn in their
"full time" job.
Thanks for the info.
maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other benefit
(ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not reduce the
amount received of the other benefit although working more would?
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It
simply marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work for
social security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance
of PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more
than those sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential
benefit receipt whilst limiting the amount of effort they have to
make.
"course"
"prevalence"
Why, thank you kindly sir.
The first is miskeying, the second is ignorance.
They were both due to miskeying (think about that second one for a
moment). My mind works faster then my typing skills allow.
Pamela
2018-12-05 18:49:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47  30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
    From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU
countries hits     astonishing 14-year high UK net
migration is running at     almost 275,000 a year,
despite the figure  from the EU     falling to
its lowest level in nearly six years. Official    
figures published today show that net migration from
outside     the bloc, which government can
control, is at its highest     level in
14  years. Campaigners for lower immigration   Â
described the figure for non-EU net  migration as
    astonishing. Overall, net migration in the
year to June was     273,000, exceeding the 
government's target of 100,000.     Non-EU net
migration was at 248,000 and EU net migration was
    74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people
working short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short
hours to just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. 
Those working no hours at all are presumably not interested in
the many jobs our economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will
tell you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand
for part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be
revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the average
bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working
Tax but I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted
to work no more than a modest number of hours but wanted a
better hourly rate to compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not
less) is regarded, for social security purposes, as being in
full-time work. That also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal
Credit) purposes. Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly
rate, but restricting their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can
get the earnings topped up to the Tax Credit scale rates as
though they were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in
Tax/Universal Credits more than an additional 50% of what they
earn in their "full time" job.
Thanks for the info.
maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other
benefit (ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not
reduce the amount received of the other benefit although working
more would?
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It
simply marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work for
social security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance
of PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more
than those sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential
benefit receipt whilst limiting the amount of effort they have to
make.
"course"
"prevalence"
Why, thank you kindly sir.
The first is miskeying, the second is ignorance.
They were both due to miskeying (think about that second one for a
moment). My mind works faster then my typing skills allow.
You're too kind. I suspect I didn't know how to spell "prevalance"
rather that hitting neighbouring keys in a fumble.
JNugent
2018-12-05 23:02:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47  30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
    From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU
countries hits     astonishing 14-year high UK net
migration is running at     almost 275,000 a year,
despite the figure  from the EU     falling to
its lowest level in nearly six years. Official   ÂÂ
figures published today show that net migration from
outside     the bloc, which government can
control, is at its highest     level in
14  years. Campaigners for lower immigration   Â
described the figure for non-EU net  migration as
    astonishing. Overall, net migration in the
year to June was     273,000, exceeding theÂÂ
government's target of 100,000.     Non-EU net
migration was at 248,000 and EU net migration was
    74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people
working short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short
hours to just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit.ÂÂ
Those working no hours at all are presumably not interested in
the many jobs our economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will
tell you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand
for part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be
revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the average
bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working
Tax but I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted
to work no more than a modest number of hours but wanted a
better hourly rate to compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not
less) is regarded, for social security purposes, as being in
full-time work. That also includes Tax Credit (and now Universal
Credit) purposes. Esentially, someone getting a reasonable hourly
rate, but restricting their own hours to exactly 16 per week, can
get the earnings topped up to the Tax Credit scale rates as
though they were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in
Tax/Universal Credits more than an additional 50% of what they
earn in their "full time" job.
Thanks for the info.
maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other
benefit (ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not
reduce the amount received of the other benefit although working
more would?
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It
simply marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work for
social security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the prevelance
of PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want nothing more
than those sixteen a week because it it optimises their potential
benefit receipt whilst limiting the amount of effort they have to
make.
"course"
"prevalence"
Why, thank you kindly sir.
The first is miskeying, the second is ignorance.
They were both due to miskeying (think about that second one for a
moment). My mind works faster then my typing skills allow.
You're too kind. I suspect I didn't know how to spell "prevalance"
rather that hitting neighbouring keys in a fumble.
I saw my own typo and corrected it.
Pamela
2018-12-06 00:03:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On 16:47  30 Nov 2018, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
    From today's Times: Net
migration from non-EU countries hits
    astonishing 14-year high UK
net migration is running at    
almost 275,000 a year, despite the figure  from
the EU     falling to
its lowest level in nearly six years. Official
   figures published today show
that net migration from outside
    the bloc, which government
can control, is at its highest
    level in 14  years.
Campaigners for lower immigration   Â
described the figure for non-EU net  migration as
    astonishing. Overall, net
migration in the year to June was
    273,000, exceeding theÂÂ
government's target of 100,000.
    Non-EU net migration was at
248,000 and EU net migration was
    74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people
working short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short
hours to just manage to qualify for Working Tax
Credit. Those working no hours at all are presumably
not interested in the many jobs our economy needs filling
but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will
tell you that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand
for part-time jobs for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the
system. Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs
to be revalorised so as to more nearly coincide with what the
average bloke would recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and
Working Tax but I recall a friend saying she employed someone
who wanted to work no more than a modest number of hours but
wanted a better hourly rate to compensate for the limited time
worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
In brief, someone who works 16 hours a week or mnore (but not
less) is regarded, for social security purposes, as being in
full-time work. That also includes Tax Credit (and now
Universal Credit) purposes. Esentially, someone getting a
reasonable hourly rate, but restricting their own hours to
exactly 16 per week, can get the earnings topped up to the Tax
Credit scale rates as though they were a real full-time worker.
As a system, it stinks.
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in
Tax/Universal Credits more than an additional 50% of what they
earn in their "full time" job.
Thanks for the info.
maybe it's just a rumour but does his tie in with some other
benefit (ESA perhaps???) where working 16 hours a week does not
reduce the amount received of the other benefit although working
more would?
The sixteen hour rule has been in place for several decades. It
simply marks the boundary between part-time and full-time work
for social security purposes.
Of cpourse, there are some people who nowadays decry the
prevelance of PT work, apparently unaware that many workers want
nothing more than those sixteen a week because it it optimises
their potential benefit receipt whilst limiting the amount of
effort they have to make.
"course"
"prevalence"
Why, thank you kindly sir.
The first is miskeying, the second is ignorance.
They were both due to miskeying (think about that second one for a
moment). My mind works faster then my typing skills allow.
You're too kind. I suspect I didn't know how to spell "prevalance"
rather that hitting neighbouring keys in a fumble.
I saw my own typo and corrected it.
OMG. I didn't realise what you meant until you, er, spelt it out. Got
it now.

That spelling must have stayed in my mind because in the thread about
Brexit polls I'm writing "tendancy". I'm too impressionable. :)
Paul Cummins
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal
Credits more than an additional 50% of what they earn in their
"full time" job.
Do you know how little "Tax Credit" amounts to?
--
Paul Cummins - Always a NetHead
Wasting Bandwidth since 1981
JNugent
2018-12-04 18:27:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Cummins
Post by JNugent
Perhaps the rule needs to be changed so as to encourage proper
full-time jobs. A rule saying that no-one can gain in Tax/Universal
Credits more than an additional 50% of what they earn in their
"full time" job.
Do you know how little "Tax Credit" amounts to?
I do, but go on... amaze me.

But please specify what size of family you are talking about.
Paul Cummins
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Paul Cummins
Do you know how little "Tax Credit" amounts to?
I do, but go on... amaze me.
For a single person, the maximum tax credit is £51 a week.

Minimum wage, 16 hours a week, is £125.28.
--
Paul Cummins - Always a NetHead
Wasting Bandwidth since 1981
JNugent
2018-12-05 01:39:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Cummins
Post by JNugent
Post by Paul Cummins
Do you know how little "Tax Credit" amounts to?
I do, but go on... amaze me.
For a single person, the maximum tax credit is £51 a week.
Minimum wage, 16 hours a week, is £125.28.
Yes... and?
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-12-04 17:16:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Nightjar
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
From today's Times: Net migration from non-EU countries hits
astonishing 14-year high UK net migration is running at almost
275,000 a year, despite the figure from the EU falling to its
lowest level in nearly six years. Official figures published
today show that net migration from outside the bloc, which
government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for
non-EU net migration as astonishing. Overall, net migration in
the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the government's target
of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and EU net
migration was 74,000.
We need immigrants, to keep our work force from shrinking.
Why then do we have so many millions of ill-paid people working
short hours or no hours at all?
I found there's a surprising number of people working short hours to
just manage to qualify for Working Tax Credit. Those working no
hours at all are presumably not interested in the many jobs our
economy needs filling but can't find.
Correct. Anyone who employs relatively unskilled workers will tell you
that there is nowadays a quite unprecedented demand for part-time jobs
for 16 hours a week.
This sounds like a large number of people "gaming" the system.
Perhaps, for tax credit purposes, "full-time" needs to be revalorised
so as to more nearly coincide with what the average bloke would
recognise as a full time job.
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working Tax but
I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted to work no more
than a modest number of hours but wanted a better hourly rate to
compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
Less work, more money. The French are just as bad.
The Peeler
2018-12-04 19:29:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 04 Dec 2018 09:16:20 -0800, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Pamela
I don't know the exact rules regarding hours worked and Working Tax but
I recall a friend saying she employed someone who wanted to work no more
than a modest number of hours but wanted a better hourly rate to
compensate for the limited time worked.
Must be that pesky British Disease.
Less work, more money. The French are just as bad.
NEITHER are as bad as the lazy, workshy serbs infesting western Europe. BTW,
peddled any satellite dishes successfully lately, Razovic? <G>
--
Dumb serb Razovic trying to peddle used satellite dishes on Usenet LOL:
"If you are in London or nearby, please e-mail me (***@callnetuk.com) - I
may have one available."
Vidcapper
2018-11-30 10:12:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Yes - it suggests that immigrants do not buy into Project Fear...
--
Paul Hyett, Cheltenham
The Todal
2018-12-01 09:36:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vidcapper
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Yes - it suggests that immigrants do not buy into Project Fear...
It suggests that immigrants from non EU countries do not buy into
Project Fear. Those from EU countries know that if they try to come to
the UK to build a future, they might be sent home one day.

But it also suggests that "controlling our own borders" means letting in
just as many people or more, so the government can't keep up the
pretence that after Brexit there will be more homes and more jobs
available for native Brits.
Omega
2018-11-30 19:29:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Todal
Do the Leave supporters want to comment?
Net migration from non-EU countries hits ‘astonishing’ 14-year high
UK net migration is running at almost 275,000 a year, despite the figure
from the EU falling to its lowest level in nearly six years.
Official figures published today show that net migration from outside
the bloc, which government can control, is at its highest level in 14 years.
Campaigners for lower immigration described the figure for non-EU net
migration as “astonishing”.
Overall, net migration in the year to June was 273,000, exceeding the
government’s target of 100,000. Non-EU net migration was at 248,000 and
EU net migration was 74,000.
Latest available figures for foreign students?

Another little earner for Britain!

omega
Loading...