Discussion:
Poached Eggs
(too old to reply)
Omega
2014-02-17 13:05:45 UTC
Permalink
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?

This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy residue
around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the bloody sink
up.

Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was once
a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?

Is nothing effing sacred?

omega

................................
True Blue
2014-02-17 13:16:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy residue
around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the bloody
sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs. *Any* eggs from
shops are systemically designed to be inferior by dint of the legal
processes they are required to conform to, to get on the shelves at all.
Norman Wells
2014-02-17 14:25:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do
I get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the
poached eggs from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking
the bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us,
found some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for
what was once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread
toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
True Blue
2014-02-17 14:51:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do
I get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the
poached eggs from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking
the bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us,
found some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for
what was once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread
toast? Is nothing effing sacred?
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Ophelia
2014-02-17 15:06:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do
I get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the
poached eggs from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking
the bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us,
found some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for
what was once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread
toast? Is nothing effing sacred?
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Aye them Fiskerton lads are made of strong stuff ;-)
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
True Blue
2014-02-17 21:40:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by True Blue
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Aye them Fiskerton lads are made of strong stuff ;-)
Fiskerton lads are jessies. Us Nettleham lads, on the other hand....
Ophelia
2014-02-17 22:17:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by Ophelia
Post by True Blue
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Aye them Fiskerton lads are made of strong stuff ;-)
Fiskerton lads are jessies. Us Nettleham lads, on the other hand....
?? though you said you came from Fiskerton?? Oh well, Nettleham will do
fine:) LOL

<mutter> where on earth did I get Fiskerton from<g>
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
Norman Wells
2014-02-17 15:15:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why
do I get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the
poached eggs from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking
the bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us,
found some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for
what was once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white
bread toast? Is nothing effing sacred?
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Actually all it does is make you feel absolutely wretched and quite
seriously ill. There's no lasting benefit.
True Blue
2014-02-17 21:39:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Actually all it does is make you feel absolutely wretched and quite
seriously ill. There's no lasting benefit.
I was - of course - being glib. My Mrs got salmonella whilst we were in
Sardinia. Not good.
®i©ardo
2014-02-18 14:39:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Actually all it does is make you feel absolutely wretched and quite
seriously ill. There's no lasting benefit.
I was - of course - being glib. My Mrs got salmonella whilst we were in
Sardinia. Not good.
I bet she'll never eat them again.

;-)
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
David D S
2014-02-18 15:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Actually all it does is make you feel absolutely wretched and
quite seriously ill. There's no lasting benefit.
I was - of course - being glib. My Mrs got salmonella whilst we
were in Sardinia. Not good.
I bet she'll never eat them again.
;-)
I've never eaten any kind of shellfish after getting food poisoning from
a bag of cockles bought in a Birmingham pub pack in 1978. It was a
case of one-trial learning with a vengeance. When I was encouraged
to eat some by my wife a few years ago, I began to feel nauseous
as soon as she held up some and moved the chopsticks close to my
mouth try to tempt me.
--
David D S: UK and PR China. (Native BrEng speaker)
Use Reply-To header for email. This email address will be
valid for at least 2 weeks from 2014/2/18 22:58:20
True Blue
2014-02-19 10:03:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Actually all it does is make you feel absolutely wretched and quite
seriously ill. There's no lasting benefit.
I was - of course - being glib. My Mrs got salmonella whilst we were in
Sardinia. Not good.
I bet she'll never eat them again.
;-)
Prawn cocktail was the culprit. And yes, she's *very* wary!
®i©ardo
2014-02-19 10:41:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Actually all it does is make you feel absolutely wretched and quite
seriously ill. There's no lasting benefit.
I was - of course - being glib. My Mrs got salmonella whilst we were in
Sardinia. Not good.
I bet she'll never eat them again.
;-)
Prawn cocktail was the culprit. And yes, she's *very* wary!
Yes, it does have that effect.
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
Ophelia
2014-02-19 12:24:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by True Blue
Chicken shit is the only "quality mark" I like on my eggs.
Fond of salmonella, are you?
That which doesn't kill me, only makes me stronger.
Actually all it does is make you feel absolutely wretched and quite
seriously ill. There's no lasting benefit.
I was - of course - being glib. My Mrs got salmonella whilst we were in
Sardinia. Not good.
I bet she'll never eat them again.
;-)
Prawn cocktail was the culprit. And yes, she's *very* wary!
Geez that can make you really ill:(
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
Jeff
2014-02-17 13:44:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I
get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs
from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the
bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
omega
................................
Taking eggs straight from the fridge will do it, as well as having the
water boiling too fast.

Jeff
®i©ardo
2014-02-18 14:46:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I
get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs
from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the
bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
omega
................................
Taking eggs straight from the fridge will do it, as well as having the
water boiling too fast.
Jeff
Why keep eggs in a fridge?

If there was any benefit in doing so, particularly on "health" grounds,
then the supermarkets would have them in chill cabinets.
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
.
2014-02-18 15:53:53 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 14:46:10 +0000, ®i©ardo
Post by ®i©ardo
Why keep eggs in a fridge?
Because it says on the carton: Keep in fridge
Richard Tobin
2014-02-18 17:28:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by ®i©ardo
Why keep eggs in a fridge?
If there was any benefit in doing so, particularly on "health" grounds,
then the supermarkets would have them in chill cabinets.
EU regulations say that eggs should not be refrigerated before
purchase, to prevent condensation forming on them when they are
removed from the refrigerator and taken home, which would encourage
bacteria to grow and penetrate the shell.

This does not apply to the case of refrigerating them at home and
removing them shortly before cooking.

In the USA, eggs must be washed and disinfected by producers, which
removes the protective cuticle, and sometimes sprayed with mineral
oil. They are then refrigerated. EU regulations on the other hand
prohibit washing.

-- Richard
®i©ardo
2014-02-19 10:39:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by ®i©ardo
Why keep eggs in a fridge?
If there was any benefit in doing so, particularly on "health" grounds,
then the supermarkets would have them in chill cabinets.
EU regulations say that eggs should not be refrigerated before
purchase, to prevent condensation forming on them when they are
removed from the refrigerator and taken home, which would encourage
bacteria to grow and penetrate the shell.
This does not apply to the case of refrigerating them at home and
removing them shortly before cooking.
In the USA, eggs must be washed and disinfected by producers, which
removes the protective cuticle, and sometimes sprayed with mineral
oil. They are then refrigerated. EU regulations on the other hand
prohibit washing.
-- Richard
The lunatics really are running the asylum.
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
Richard Tobin
2014-02-19 21:37:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by ®i©ardo
The lunatics really are running the asylum.
Really? Which set of regulations do you object to, the European
or the American?

-- Richard
®i©ardo
2014-02-20 14:09:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by ®i©ardo
The lunatics really are running the asylum.
Really? Which set of regulations do you object to, the European
or the American?
-- Richard
If we followed the EU logic then their rules regarding refrigeration
should be applied to all other foods.
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
.
2014-02-20 17:11:56 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Feb 2014 14:09:37 +0000, ®i©ardo
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by ®i©ardo
The lunatics really are running the asylum.
Really? Which set of regulations do you object to, the European
or the American?
-- Richard
If we followed the EU logic then their rules regarding refrigeration
should be applied to all other foods.
Biscuits?
®i©ardo
2014-02-20 21:52:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
On Thu, 20 Feb 2014 14:09:37 +0000, ®i©ardo
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by ®i©ardo
The lunatics really are running the asylum.
Really? Which set of regulations do you object to, the European
or the American?
-- Richard
If we followed the EU logic then their rules regarding refrigeration
should be applied to all other foods.
Biscuits?
Whatever turns you on.
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
.
2014-02-21 20:00:06 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Feb 2014 21:52:07 +0000, ®i©ardo
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by .
On Thu, 20 Feb 2014 14:09:37 +0000, ®i©ardo
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by ®i©ardo
The lunatics really are running the asylum.
Really? Which set of regulations do you object to, the European
or the American?
-- Richard
If we followed the EU logic then their rules regarding refrigeration
should be applied to all other foods.
Biscuits?
Whatever turns you on.
Chocolate fingers, m'lady?
Richard Tobin
2014-02-21 11:52:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by ®i©ardo
If we followed the EU logic then their rules regarding refrigeration
should be applied to all other foods.
Quite so. When you buy a pack of sliced ham, you should be careful
that its porous shell doesn't become damp.

-- Richard
Martin
2014-02-17 13:56:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I
get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs
from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the
bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
Make sure the eggs are as fresh as you can otherwise the whites will
separate.

Eggs should be at room temperature

Water gently simmering not boiling
The Todal
2014-02-17 13:57:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I
get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs
from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the
bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
Make sure the eggs are as fresh as you can otherwise the whites will
separate.
Eggs should be at room temperature
Water gently simmering not boiling
Maybe it's risky using eggs which contain Omega 3....
AndyW
2014-02-17 14:10:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I
get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs
from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the
bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Sounds like your eggs are old.
The fresher the egg the more glutinous the white and so it spreads less
in the water. As the egg ages the white becomes more watery.

Andy
Max Demian
2014-02-17 15:28:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?
Put a dash of vinegar in the water before poaching.
--
Max Demian
Vidcapper
2014-02-17 17:25:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I
get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs
from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the
bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
I use a poacher, rather than a pan.

By trial & error : I only use smaller eggs that're less likely to
overflow the poaching trays, and I heat the water slowly.
--
Paul Hyett, Cheltenham
.
2014-02-17 18:05:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy residue
around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the bloody sink
up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was once
a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
omega
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
Max Demian
2014-02-17 22:45:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy residue
around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the bloody sink
up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was once
a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
I like the watery taste of eggs poached in the water. And they take three
minutes instead of five.

(Silicone poach pods are a satisfactory, and cheap substitute for an egg
poacher.)
--
Max Demian
.
2014-02-18 07:12:24 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 22:45:47 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy residue
around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the bloody sink
up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was once
a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
I like the watery taste of eggs poached in the water. And they take three
minutes instead of five.
Oh, well, if you LIKE the watery taste, go for it! Personally, it's
the watery taste that puts me right off poached eggs.
Post by Max Demian
(Silicone poach pods are a satisfactory, and cheap substitute for an egg
poacher.)
Could well be, but the things are so expensive, I have yet to try
them. I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at
least.

However, I have discovered yet another way of cooking eggs: Broiling.

What is a broiled egg? Well, it's the name I've come up with for my
new invention. I actually like *fried* eggs the best. But fried eggs
are unhealthy, because of the fat. A typical greasy spoon fried egg is
VERY unhealthy, fried in a bath of bacon and sausage fat that has
probably been reheated umpteen times that same day. Tastes heavenly,
but is VERY unhealthy.

McDonalds eggs are healthy.

So, what's to do? Well, what I do sometimes, not always, is to place a
very small knob of Clover in a quite small frying pan (no more than 6
inches diameter), heat it up so that it is ~just~ runny, break the egg
in, then immediately place a saucepan lid over the frying pan. Steam
starts to form, so that the egg is kinda broiled, kinda fried. It
still isn't as healthy as a poached egg (although even the silicone
poachers suggest using a wipe of butter or fat of some kind), but it
is in my opinion the healthiest form of pseudo fried egg you'll find
on the planet, and well tasty!

It would probably also work with a teaspoon (almost wrote level
teaspoon there!) of sunflower oil.

My list of egg cooking methods in descending order of preference:
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Norman Wells
2014-02-18 09:20:56 UTC
Permalink
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.

But there are some possible solutions:

1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.

Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam. You need to leave at
least two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to leave
one of them free of a cup to do that properly.

They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath. To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.

Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate the
cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
True Blue
2014-02-18 12:04:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.
1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.
Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam. You need to leave at least
two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to leave one of
them free of a cup to do that properly.
They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath. To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.
Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate the
cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
And tastier than fried or scrambled. It seems that eggs are best left
unadulterated.
Ophelia
2014-02-18 12:26:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.
1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.
Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam. You need to leave at
least two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to leave
one of them free of a cup to do that properly.
They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath. To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.
Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate the
cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
And tastier than fried or scrambled. It seems that eggs are best left
unadulterated.
I always put my eggs in a small frying pan with butter. Cook on a low heat
with a lid on. When the top of the yolks have a whitish tinge they are
ready:)
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
.
2014-02-18 12:34:39 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 12:04:28 -0000, "True Blue"
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.
1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.
Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam. You need to leave at least
two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to leave one of
them free of a cup to do that properly.
They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath. To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.
Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate the
cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
And tastier than fried or scrambled. It seems that eggs are best left
unadulterated.
Nope. Fried eggs are the tastiest, provided little fat/oil/butter/marg
is used. But ALL cooking methods produce tasty eggs, which is one of
my favourite foods alongside potatoes and bread. Those three I
couldn't live without. I'd happily give up broccoli for ever. Spinach
deffo. Horrid stuff.

For lunch today . is having lobster bisque with cheese straws.
Breakfast was smoked cod with dill, a roll and Bertolli. Supper? I
haven't decided yet.
True Blue
2014-02-18 13:02:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 12:04:28 -0000, "True Blue"
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.
1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.
Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam. You need to leave at least
two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to leave one of
them free of a cup to do that properly.
They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath. To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.
Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate the
cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
And tastier than fried or scrambled. It seems that eggs are best left
unadulterated.
Nope. Fried eggs are the tastiest, provided little fat/oil/butter/marg
is used. But ALL cooking methods produce tasty eggs, which is one of
my favourite foods alongside potatoes and bread. Those three I
couldn't live without. I'd happily give up broccoli for ever. Spinach
deffo. Horrid stuff.
For lunch today . is having lobster bisque with cheese straws.
Breakfast was smoked cod with dill, a roll and Bertolli. Supper? I
haven't decided yet.
My fare thus far, has been porridge made with milk in which raisins,
apricots and walnuts have been soaked overnight. I forgot about adding the
banana until halfway through.

Lunch here at my desk at work was Thai curry with brocoli, sweetcorn and
brown basmati rice.

I think I will have fruit and yoghurt for tea.

Talking of tea, it's time for a brew. Yorkshire Gold steeped for at least 4
minutes.
.
2014-02-18 16:04:00 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 13:02:43 -0000, "True Blue"
Post by True Blue
Post by .
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 12:04:28 -0000, "True Blue"
Post by True Blue
Post by Norman Wells
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.
1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.
Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam. You need to leave at least
two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to leave one of
them free of a cup to do that properly.
They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath. To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.
Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate the
cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
And tastier than fried or scrambled. It seems that eggs are best left
unadulterated.
Nope. Fried eggs are the tastiest, provided little fat/oil/butter/marg
is used. But ALL cooking methods produce tasty eggs, which is one of
my favourite foods alongside potatoes and bread. Those three I
couldn't live without. I'd happily give up broccoli for ever. Spinach
deffo. Horrid stuff.
For lunch today . is having lobster bisque with cheese straws.
Breakfast was smoked cod with dill, a roll and Bertolli. Supper? I
haven't decided yet.
My fare thus far, has been porridge made with milk in which raisins,
apricots and walnuts have been soaked overnight. I forgot about adding the
banana until halfway through.
The fruit components are okay, but you can forget porridge. It's vile.
It looks vile and tastes worse. I tried some of those Oats So Simple
once, and even they were vile made up as per directions with hot milk.
However, they are NOT vile if sprinkled dry over muesli or shreddies,
and I love Tesco's oat clusters. I suppose it's because I loathe hot
milk on cereals. Even when it's minus 5 below I'll eat my breakfast
cereals with ice-cold milk straight from the fridge. The colder the
better.
Post by True Blue
Lunch here at my desk at work was Thai curry with brocoli, sweetcorn and
brown basmati rice.
That sounds quite tasty, despite the broccoli. Yes, I WILL eat small
amounts of broccoli, but whereas I can make a whole meal out of
cauliflower cheese and potatoes, I couldn't imagine the same with
broccoli. I do have a Morrisons Chinese chicken curry and rice in the
fridge, but it's over 500 calories and I don't have enough left from
my daily allowance.
Post by True Blue
I think I will have fruit and yoghurt for tea.
Is that all? How many calories are you consuming per day?
Post by True Blue
Talking of tea, it's time for a brew. Yorkshire Gold steeped for at least 4
minutes.
That's all right-ish, but NOT 4 minutes! That would be tea soup down
here. No, I buy Aldi tea bags and steep them for 90 seconds. Plenty
strong enough. See bottom pic in left-most column:
http://www.zazzle.co.uk/h_m_british_tea_colour_chart_mug_black_rim-168122249869976081
True Blue
2014-02-19 10:09:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
Post by True Blue
I think I will have fruit and yoghurt for tea.
Is that all? How many calories are you consuming per day?
I don't know - 'bout 1800, I suppose. No rigid regime...if I really want a
ribeye at night, I'll have one.
Post by .
Post by True Blue
Talking of tea, it's time for a brew. Yorkshire Gold steeped for at least 4
minutes.
That's all right-ish, but NOT 4 minutes! That would be tea soup down
here. No, I buy Aldi tea bags and steep them for 90 seconds. Plenty
It is not the steeping time that should dictate the strength, but the amount
of tea! If you are using bags, then steep for 4-5 minutes, pour some down
the sink and then top-up with boiling water. The tea leaves *need* to be
steeped for this time to fully impart their flavour.
Post by .
http://www.zazzle.co.uk/h_m_british_tea_colour_chart_mug_black_rim-168122249869976081
An excellent mug.
.
2014-02-18 12:29:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.
What on earth can possibly be "sad" about keeping a utensil in perfect
working order for 30 years?
No, there aren't, because to have a solution, you first need a
problem, and there isn't one.
Post by Norman Wells
1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.
Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam.
I.e. my new invention, the broiled egg.
Post by Norman Wells
You need to leave at
least two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to leave
one of them free of a cup to do that properly.
No, you don't need any holes if steam envelopes the egg anyway, as per
my instructions for my newly invented broiled egg.
Post by Norman Wells
They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath.
I.e. steam again. The poaching cup doesn't sit in the water; there is
a small amount of water that boils which creates the steam that cooks
the egg.
Post by Norman Wells
To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.
Well, would you believe it! My "sad" (your term) little egg poacher IS
made of metal.
Post by Norman Wells
Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate the
cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
Yep, that works, too. But I now prefer my broiled version.
Norman Wells
2014-02-18 12:48:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
Post by Norman Wells
I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at least.
How sad.
What on earth can possibly be "sad" about keeping a utensil in perfect
working order for 30 years?
No, there aren't, because to have a solution, you first need a
problem, and there isn't one.
There is. Poached eggs are bottom of the league table you produced, and
they shouldn't be. The Poached Egg team manager needs to take some
drastic action.
Post by .
Post by Norman Wells
1) Get a dotty wife
2) Buy a double poacher.
Poached eggs need cooking on top by the steam.
I.e. my new invention, the broiled egg.
Post by Norman Wells
You need to leave at
least two holes in a poacher even for one egg because you need to
leave one of them free of a cup to do that properly.
No, you don't need any holes if steam envelopes the egg anyway, as per
my instructions for my newly invented broiled egg.
Post by Norman Wells
They also need to be cooked from the bottom by the heat of the water
beneath.
I.e. steam again. The poaching cup doesn't sit in the water; there is
a small amount of water that boils which creates the steam that cooks
the egg.
Post by Norman Wells
To do that properly, the cups need to be metal, not plastic or
silicone which are very poor conductors of heat.
Well, would you believe it! My "sad" (your term) little egg poacher IS
made of metal.
Post by Norman Wells
Follow these simple rules, use a small knob of butter to lubricate
the cup, and see your poached eggs rocket up your popularity table.
Yep, that works, too. But I now prefer my broiled version.
There's no accounting for taste.

But I submit that there's a very good reason why broiling has never been
a standard method of cooking eggs. And it's very similar to the reason
why 'local' specialities remain local.
Max Demian
2014-02-18 10:38:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 22:45:47 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
(Silicone poach pods are a satisfactory, and cheap substitute for an egg
poacher.)
Could well be, but the things are so expensive, I have yet to try
them. I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at
least.
Poach pods are £5 for two. The single egg poacher you linked costs £9.99.
And who wants just one egg?
Post by .
However, I have discovered yet another way of cooking eggs: Broiling.
What is a broiled egg? Well, it's the name I've come up with for my
new invention. I actually like *fried* eggs the best. But fried eggs
are unhealthy, because of the fat. A typical greasy spoon fried egg is
VERY unhealthy, fried in a bath of bacon and sausage fat that has
probably been reheated umpteen times that same day. Tastes heavenly,
but is VERY unhealthy.
McDonalds eggs are healthy.
So, what's to do? Well, what I do sometimes, not always, is to place a
very small knob of Clover in a quite small frying pan (no more than 6
inches diameter), heat it up so that it is ~just~ runny, break the egg
in, then immediately place a saucepan lid over the frying pan. Steam
starts to form, so that the egg is kinda broiled, kinda fried. It
still isn't as healthy as a poached egg (although even the silicone
poachers suggest using a wipe of butter or fat of some kind), but it
is in my opinion the healthiest form of pseudo fried egg you'll find
on the planet, and well tasty!
It would probably also work with a teaspoon (almost wrote level
teaspoon there!) of sunflower oil.
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
With a really good non-stick frying pan, you don't need any fat or oil.

'Broiling' is just American for grilling.

Is it possible to grill an egg? Many years ago someone said he had grilled
eggs for breakfast - I asked him how, and he said, 'with a grill'.

I've never been able to find out what he meant. The nearest I have seen is
finishing off an omelette under a grill, particularly convenient on the
original 'Baby Belling' that had a solid hotplate that heated the grill
underneath with the same element.
--
Max Demian
.
2014-02-18 12:37:31 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:38:51 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 22:45:47 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
(Silicone poach pods are a satisfactory, and cheap substitute for an egg
poacher.)
Could well be, but the things are so expensive, I have yet to try
them. I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at
least.
Poach pods are £5 for two. The single egg poacher you linked costs £9.99.
And who wants just one egg?
Me! I am fighting a constant battle with my weight. One egg is
perfectly sufficient for breakfast -- after one has polished off the
rest of the suckling pig and a plate of roast potatoes from
yesterday...

Yes, it IS expensive if you don't have a poacher and need to buy one,
but I have the advantage of using my 30-year-old poacher, which
probably cost about threepence when purchased.
Norman Wells
2014-02-18 12:50:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:38:51 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 22:45:47 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
(Silicone poach pods are a satisfactory, and cheap substitute for
an egg poacher.)
Could well be, but the things are so expensive, I have yet to try
them. I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at
least.
Poach pods are £5 for two. The single egg poacher you linked costs
£9.99. And who wants just one egg?
Me! I am fighting a constant battle with my weight. One egg is
perfectly sufficient for breakfast -- after one has polished off the
rest of the suckling pig and a plate of roast potatoes from
yesterday...
Yes, it IS expensive if you don't have a poacher and need to buy one,
but I have the advantage of using my 30-year-old poacher, which
probably cost about threepence when purchased.
So, why are they bottom of the league?
.
2014-02-18 16:05:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by .
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:38:51 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 22:45:47 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
(Silicone poach pods are a satisfactory, and cheap substitute for
an egg poacher.)
Could well be, but the things are so expensive, I have yet to try
them. I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at
least.
Poach pods are £5 for two. The single egg poacher you linked costs
£9.99. And who wants just one egg?
Me! I am fighting a constant battle with my weight. One egg is
perfectly sufficient for breakfast -- after one has polished off the
rest of the suckling pig and a plate of roast potatoes from
yesterday...
Yes, it IS expensive if you don't have a poacher and need to buy one,
but I have the advantage of using my 30-year-old poacher, which
probably cost about threepence when purchased.
So, why are they bottom of the league?
Because I've invented my broiling method as described.
.
2014-02-18 12:48:40 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:38:51 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
On Mon, 17 Feb 2014 22:45:47 -0000, "Max Demian"
Post by Max Demian
Post by .
Use an egg poacher. Perfect poached eggs.
http://www.palmerstores.com/product/judge-mini-egg-poacher/677/
(Silicone poach pods are a satisfactory, and cheap substitute for an egg
poacher.)
Could well be, but the things are so expensive, I have yet to try
them. I have had my little single egg poacher now for 30 years at
least.
Poach pods are £5 for two. The single egg poacher you linked costs £9.99.
And who wants just one egg?
Post by .
However, I have discovered yet another way of cooking eggs: Broiling.
What is a broiled egg? Well, it's the name I've come up with for my
new invention. I actually like *fried* eggs the best. But fried eggs
are unhealthy, because of the fat. A typical greasy spoon fried egg is
VERY unhealthy, fried in a bath of bacon and sausage fat that has
probably been reheated umpteen times that same day. Tastes heavenly,
but is VERY unhealthy.
McDonalds eggs are healthy.
So, what's to do? Well, what I do sometimes, not always, is to place a
very small knob of Clover in a quite small frying pan (no more than 6
inches diameter), heat it up so that it is ~just~ runny, break the egg
in, then immediately place a saucepan lid over the frying pan. Steam
starts to form, so that the egg is kinda broiled, kinda fried. It
still isn't as healthy as a poached egg (although even the silicone
poachers suggest using a wipe of butter or fat of some kind), but it
is in my opinion the healthiest form of pseudo fried egg you'll find
on the planet, and well tasty!
It would probably also work with a teaspoon (almost wrote level
teaspoon there!) of sunflower oil.
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
With a really good non-stick frying pan, you don't need any fat or oil.
'Broiling' is just American for grilling.
Is it possible to grill an egg? Many years ago someone said he had grilled
eggs for breakfast - I asked him how, and he said, 'with a grill'.
I've never been able to find out what he meant. The nearest I have seen is
finishing off an omelette under a grill, particularly convenient on the
original 'Baby Belling' that had a solid hotplate that heated the grill
underneath with the same element.
Omelettes are ruined under the grill. As a connoisseur of eggs, I have
gained a great deal of experience in cooking omelettes since the
1970s. The best omelette I ever ate was on a French cross-channel
ferry about forty years ago, although I reckon my own omelettes could
gain a Masterchef-type accolade.

Omelette cooking is more an art than a science. You have to be brave.
Brave enough to take the omelette out of the pan BEFORE you think it's
ready. Because it carries on cooking with the internal heat. A
omelette that isn't a little runny inside is an utterly rubbish
omelette! And as for rubbery omelettes, they only belong in the dog.

I don't use a frying pan, I use a non-stick milk pan. Why? Well, even
a small frying pan cooks the liquid egg too quickly, whereas the milk
pan has higher sides and smaller diameter to allow the omelette to
build thickness whilst remaining runny. Like I said, fold over the
omelette when it's still very runny, because when you tip it on your
warmed (not hot) plate it will carry on cooking for a few seconds. The
outside should be ~just~ straw-coloured, NOT brown. Always pour in the
eggs into a very hot pan and cook omelettes really quickly. (Unlike
scrambled eggs, which should be cooked slowly and stirred over low
heat. I use a bain marie for scrambled eggs.)

My favourite filling for omelettes: prawns and mushrooms, salt and
black pepper, although Aromat is also a good seasoning to use.
kat
2014-02-21 08:14:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Max Demian
'Broiling' is just American for grilling.
Is it possible to grill an egg? Many years ago someone said he had
grilled eggs for breakfast - I asked him how, and he said, 'with a
grill'.
I've never been able to find out what he meant. The nearest I have
seen is finishing off an omelette under a grill, particularly
convenient on the original 'Baby Belling' that had a solid hotplate
that heated the grill underneath with the same element.
Some years ago I asked an American friend of mine why a grilled cheese
sandwich was called that given they were cooking it in a frying pan. The
answer was that it was grilled because it wasn't cooked in fat. To fry
meant the fat should be lapping round the edges. On that definition my
fried eggs are grilled. :-)
--
kat
Post by Max Demian
^..^<
.
2014-02-21 08:39:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by kat
Post by Max Demian
'Broiling' is just American for grilling.
Is it possible to grill an egg? Many years ago someone said he had
grilled eggs for breakfast - I asked him how, and he said, 'with a
grill'.
I've never been able to find out what he meant. The nearest I have
seen is finishing off an omelette under a grill, particularly
convenient on the original 'Baby Belling' that had a solid hotplate
that heated the grill underneath with the same element.
Some years ago I asked an American friend of mine why a grilled cheese
sandwich was called that given they were cooking it in a frying pan. The
answer was that it was grilled because it wasn't cooked in fat. To fry
meant the fat should be lapping round the edges. On that definition my
fried eggs are grilled. :-)
I saw a YouTube video recently of that American-style "grilled" cheese
sandwich and it looked possibly the most unhealthy meal I've seen in a
long time. Isn't it strange how one never sees obesity in American
movies? The actors are always slim, svelte, never obese. Before
politicial correctness really took a hold, you did see characters like
John Goodman and John Candy, but now the message from Hollywood is,
here, folks, is ANOTHER fantasy 'bout America we're serving up to ya!
Have a nice day!
Norman Wells
2014-02-21 08:55:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by kat
Post by Max Demian
'Broiling' is just American for grilling.
Is it possible to grill an egg? Many years ago someone said he had
grilled eggs for breakfast - I asked him how, and he said, 'with a
grill'.
I've never been able to find out what he meant. The nearest I have
seen is finishing off an omelette under a grill, particularly
convenient on the original 'Baby Belling' that had a solid hotplate
that heated the grill underneath with the same element.
Some years ago I asked an American friend of mine why a grilled cheese
sandwich was called that given they were cooking it in a frying pan.
The answer was that it was grilled because it wasn't cooked in fat. To
fry meant the fat should be lapping round the edges. On that
definition my fried eggs are grilled. :-)
Or 'griddled', which is what they meant to say or what you misheard -
it's hard to tell with Americans.

But they're absolutely right about frying.
Max Demian
2014-02-21 11:14:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by kat
Post by Max Demian
'Broiling' is just American for grilling.
Is it possible to grill an egg? Many years ago someone said he had
grilled eggs for breakfast - I asked him how, and he said, 'with a
grill'.
I've never been able to find out what he meant. The nearest I have
seen is finishing off an omelette under a grill, particularly
convenient on the original 'Baby Belling' that had a solid hotplate
that heated the grill underneath with the same element.
Some years ago I asked an American friend of mine why a grilled cheese
sandwich was called that given they were cooking it in a frying pan. The
answer was that it was grilled because it wasn't cooked in fat. To fry
meant the fat should be lapping round the edges.
So stir-frying isn't frying? (The wok is barely coated with oil.) So what do
Chinese people do?
--
Max Demian
pensive hamster
2014-02-21 11:39:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Max Demian
Post by kat
Some years ago I asked an American friend of mine why a grilled cheese
sandwich was called that given they were cooking it in a frying pan. The
answer was that it was grilled because it wasn't cooked in fat. To fry
meant the fat should be lapping round the edges.
So stir-frying isn't frying? (The wok is barely coated with oil.) So what do
Chinese people do?
Stir-gliddling?
kat
2014-02-21 16:04:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Max Demian
Post by kat
Post by Max Demian
'Broiling' is just American for grilling.
Is it possible to grill an egg? Many years ago someone said he had
grilled eggs for breakfast - I asked him how, and he said, 'with a
grill'.
I've never been able to find out what he meant. The nearest I have
seen is finishing off an omelette under a grill, particularly
convenient on the original 'Baby Belling' that had a solid hotplate
that heated the grill underneath with the same element.
Some years ago I asked an American friend of mine why a grilled
cheese sandwich was called that given they were cooking it in a
frying pan. The answer was that it was grilled because it wasn't
cooked in fat. To fry meant the fat should be lapping round the
edges.
So stir-frying isn't frying? (The wok is barely coated with oil.) So
what do Chinese people do?
Don't ask me - us British people in the group were totally bemused by the
whole thing.
--
kat
Post by Max Demian
^..^<
AndyW
2014-02-19 07:40:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.

All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.

Andy
True Blue
2014-02-19 10:11:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
®i©ardo
2014-02-19 10:43:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
But was it a "fresh new egg"?
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
.
2014-02-19 13:07:41 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 19 Feb 2014 10:43:08 +0000, ®i©ardo
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
But was it a "fresh new egg"?
Even a fresh new egg will end up being somewhat watery if simply
dunked in simmering water, swirling or not.
True Blue
2014-02-19 13:49:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
But was it a "fresh new egg"?
Oh, yes. I don't have shop eggs.
®i©ardo
2014-02-20 14:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by ®i©ardo
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
But was it a "fresh new egg"?
Oh, yes. I don't have shop eggs.
Nor do I.

Straight form the farm, all shapes and sizes and much cheaper than the
shop bought ones with stamp marks all over them.
--
Moving Things In Still Pictures
Ophelia
2014-02-19 12:24:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
I don't like my egg touching water at all.
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
Vidcapper
2014-02-19 17:25:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
I don't like my egg touching water at all.
Surely that make it rather difficult for you to eat them? :)
--
Paul Hyett, Cheltenham
Ophelia
2014-02-19 17:45:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Ophelia
I don't like my egg touching water at all.
Surely that make it rather difficult for you to eat them? :)
;-)
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
AndyW
2014-02-20 07:35:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
That's why you need a very fresh egg, newer eggs are thicker and so
dissipate less in the water. Older eggs are runnier and make a spider's
web of wet egg white.
I have a hen keeping neighbour (sadly missus draws the line at me
keeping hens) so many of my eggs are, at most, a day old. Nice and thick.

Andy
.
2014-02-20 08:04:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyW
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
That's why you need a very fresh egg, newer eggs are thicker and so
dissipate less in the water. Older eggs are runnier and make a spider's
web of wet egg white.
I have a hen keeping neighbour (sadly missus draws the line at me
keeping hens) so many of my eggs are, at most, a day old. Nice and thick.
I have wondered myself whether to keep a couple of laying hens. But
will the neighbours complain about the constant clucking? And what
does one do when on goes on holiday? A cat you can lodge at a cattery,
dog to a doggery. But hens? Or maybe you just slaughter them once a
year, then get new ones after the hols.
Norman Wells
2014-02-20 08:53:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
I have wondered myself whether to keep a couple of laying hens. But
will the neighbours complain about the constant clucking? And what
does one do when on goes on holiday? A cat you can lodge at a cattery,
dog to a doggery. But hens? Or maybe you just slaughter them once a
year, then get new ones after the hols.
All you need is a special coop, but you'll have to find someone to make
it.

Like Hennery Cooper.
.
2014-02-20 17:13:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by .
I have wondered myself whether to keep a couple of laying hens. But
will the neighbours complain about the constant clucking? And what
does one do when on goes on holiday? A cat you can lodge at a cattery,
dog to a doggery. But hens? Or maybe you just slaughter them once a
year, then get new ones after the hols.
All you need is a special coop, but you'll have to find someone to make
it.
Like Hennery Cooper.
No longer with us.
AndyW
2014-02-20 08:57:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
I have wondered myself whether to keep a couple of laying hens. But
will the neighbours complain about the constant clucking? And what
does one do when on goes on holiday? A cat you can lodge at a cattery,
dog to a doggery. But hens? Or maybe you just slaughter them once a
year, then get new ones after the hols.
I care for my neighbour's hens while he is away on holiday and in
exchange I get all the eggs they produce while I care for them.
All they need is to be let out in the morning, locked up at night, fed
and watered and cleaned out daily. About 10 minutes a day in 'effort'.

Just get a friend to look after them.

Andy
Ophelia
2014-02-20 10:22:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyW
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky Way. And
loads of water on your toast.
That's why you need a very fresh egg, newer eggs are thicker and so
dissipate less in the water. Older eggs are runnier and make a spider's
web of wet egg white.
I have a hen keeping neighbour (sadly missus draws the line at me keeping
hens) so many of my eggs are, at most, a day old. Nice and thick.
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB keeps hens
btw.
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
David D S
2014-02-20 13:33:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by AndyW
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
My list of egg cooking methods in descending order of
preference: Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the
boil. Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets
seem to be a bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky
Way. And loads of water on your toast.
That's why you need a very fresh egg, newer eggs are thicker and so
dissipate less in the water. Older eggs are runnier and make a
spider's web of wet egg white. I have a hen keeping neighbour
(sadly missus draws the line at me keeping hens) so many of my
eggs are, at most, a day old. Nice and thick.
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB
keeps hens btw.
Are you sure they're not ducks? Because something is definitely
quackers in that household...
--
David D S: UK and PR China. (Native BrEng speaker)
Use Reply-To header for email. This email address will be
valid for at least 2 weeks from 2014/2/20 21:33:17
True Blue
2014-02-20 14:31:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by David D S
Post by Ophelia
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB
keeps hens btw.
Are you sure they're not ducks? Because something is definitely
quackers in that household...
Oi! - fowl play!
David D S
2014-02-20 15:10:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by David D S
Post by Ophelia
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB
keeps hens btw.
Are you sure they're not ducks? Because something is definitely
quackers in that household...
Oi! - fowl play!
Sorry, I didn't realise until now that you shared initials with a
much-loved
former PM.
--
David D S: UK and PR China. (Native BrEng speaker)
Use Reply-To header for email. This email address will be
valid for at least 2 weeks from 2014/2/20 23:10:14
Ophelia
2014-02-20 17:11:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by David D S
Post by True Blue
Post by David D S
Post by Ophelia
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB
keeps hens btw.
Are you sure they're not ducks? Because something is definitely
quackers in that household...
Oi! - fowl play!
Sorry, I didn't realise until now that you shared initials with a
much-loved
former PM.
Ahh I misunderstood:)
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
Ophelia
2014-02-20 17:11:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by True Blue
Post by David D S
Post by Ophelia
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB
keeps hens btw.
Are you sure they're not ducks? Because something is definitely
quackers in that household...
Oi! - fowl play!
<g>
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
Ophelia
2014-02-20 17:10:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by David D S
Post by Ophelia
Post by AndyW
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
My list of egg cooking methods in descending order of
preference: Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the
boil. Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets
seem to be a bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky
Way. And loads of water on your toast.
That's why you need a very fresh egg, newer eggs are thicker and so
dissipate less in the water. Older eggs are runnier and make a
spider's web of wet egg white. I have a hen keeping neighbour
(sadly missus draws the line at me keeping hens) so many of my
eggs are, at most, a day old. Nice and thick.
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB
keeps hens btw.
Are you sure they're not ducks? Because something is definitely
quackers in that household...
Nahh I called him 'duck' but only because that is the general way we address
each other down there:)) In Yorkshire we use 'love':)) Up here it is
'hen' or 'pal' :)) I tend to live in a lot of places:)
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
kat
2014-02-21 08:20:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by AndyW
Post by True Blue
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem
to be a bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Tried that - you get something resembling an image of the Milky
Way. And loads of water on your toast.
That's why you need a very fresh egg, newer eggs are thicker and so
dissipate less in the water. Older eggs are runnier and make a
spider's web of wet egg white.
I have a hen keeping neighbour (sadly missus draws the line at me
keeping hens) so many of my eggs are, at most, a day old. Nice and thick.
Probably why my poached in water are not up to much. I think TB
keeps hens btw.
Even with quite old eggs I seem to manage. There is sometimes a little
stray white, but the vast majority is part of a nice round egg with gently
cooked white and a good runny yolk. I can make more mess and lose more egg
trying to cook a fried egg over easy. ( To use the US term for the way I
like them. )
--
kat
Post by Ophelia
^..^<
Ophelia
2014-02-21 10:56:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by kat
Even with quite old eggs I seem to manage. There is sometimes a little
stray white, but the vast majority is part of a nice round egg with
gently cooked white and a good runny yolk. I can make more mess and lose
more egg trying to cook a fried egg over easy. ( To use the US term for
the way I like them. )
pah don't you start going all American on me <g> It's years since I made a
poached egg because we like the way I do them now:)
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
kat
2014-02-21 16:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by kat
Even with quite old eggs I seem to manage. There is sometimes a
little stray white, but the vast majority is part of a nice round
egg with gently cooked white and a good runny yolk. I can make more
mess and lose more egg trying to cook a fried egg over easy. ( To
use the US term for the way I like them. )
pah don't you start going all American on me <g> It's years since I
made a poached egg because we like the way I do them now:)
Seems about right - why mess with success. :-)
--
kat
Post by Ophelia
^..^<
Ophelia
2014-02-21 17:30:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by kat
Post by Ophelia
Post by kat
Even with quite old eggs I seem to manage. There is sometimes a
little stray white, but the vast majority is part of a nice round
egg with gently cooked white and a good runny yolk. I can make more
mess and lose more egg trying to cook a fried egg over easy. ( To
use the US term for the way I like them. )
pah don't you start going all American on me <g> It's years since I
made a poached egg because we like the way I do them now:)
Seems about right - why mess with success. :-)
Indeed :))
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/
.
2014-02-19 13:06:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Fried egg
Broiled egg
Omelette
Scrambled egg
Boiled egg
Poached egg
Crack a fresh egg into swirling flavoured water just off the boil.
Not rocket science.
All these steaming, semi-frying, steel and silicone gadgets seem to be a
bit over complicated.
Fresh new egg, just off the boil water and a swirl.
Job Done.
Sorry, it isn't. The egg will end up watery. Would you fry an egg,
then pour a spoonful of water over it? Of course not! How about
boiling an egg, cracking it open, then pouring a spoonful of water in?
You wouldn't do that either, would you?
AndyW
2014-02-20 07:39:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
Sorry, it isn't. The egg will end up watery. Would you fry an egg,
then pour a spoonful of water over it? Of course not! How about
boiling an egg, cracking it open, then pouring a spoonful of water in?
You wouldn't do that either, would you?
It can dry. I usually drop it onto a clean towel then roll it over
before bunging it on my toast, in my soup, on my salad.....

Never had a 'watery' egg.

Andy
.
2014-02-20 08:05:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Sorry, it isn't. The egg will end up watery. Would you fry an egg,
then pour a spoonful of water over it? Of course not! How about
boiling an egg, cracking it open, then pouring a spoonful of water in?
You wouldn't do that either, would you?
It can dry. I usually drop it onto a clean towel then roll it over
before bunging it on my toast, in my soup, on my salad.....
What, a SOFT boiled egg? Doesn't it break open on the towel?
AndyW
2014-02-20 09:00:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by .
Post by AndyW
Post by .
Sorry, it isn't. The egg will end up watery. Would you fry an egg,
then pour a spoonful of water over it? Of course not! How about
boiling an egg, cracking it open, then pouring a spoonful of water in?
You wouldn't do that either, would you?
It can dry. I usually drop it onto a clean towel then roll it over
before bunging it on my toast, in my soup, on my salad.....
What, a SOFT boiled egg? Doesn't it break open on the towel?
Never had one break on me to my memory.

Andy
Snow_Flower
2014-02-23 16:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I
get left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs
from the pan?
This never used to happen years ago, perhaps a little white fluffy
residue around the pan wall but nothing as now, snot balls blocking the
bloody sink up.
Have the producers who feed the chickens that lay the eggs for us, found
some sort of bulking medium, an aqueous emulsion perhaps, for what was
once a delicious light meal when had with fresh white bread toast?
Is nothing effing sacred?
omega
Are you using hen's eggs?
I prefer duck eggs, much nicer.
pensive hamster
2014-02-25 16:48:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?
Had you considered documenting your poached egg shambles?

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2014/feb/24/sad-dinners-should-not-photograph-dimly-lit-meals
http://preview.tinyurl.com/pgluyey
24 February 2014

'recently a new phenomenon has been creeping into our consciousness,
culminating in an internet riot of glee over a site called Dimly-Lit Meals
for One - "heartbreaking images of one man's home cooking gone wrong":
the cult of the execrable food photograph. ...'

http://dimlylitmealsforone.tumblr.com/
Omega
2014-02-25 18:42:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Omega
How come if I poach three or four eggs in a pan on the stove, why do I get
left with half a pan of white snot after I've taken the poached eggs from
the pan?
Had you considered documenting your poached egg shambles?

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2014/feb/24/sad-dinners-should-not-photograph-dimly-lit-meals
http://preview.tinyurl.com/pgluyey
24 February 2014

'recently a new phenomenon has been creeping into our consciousness,
culminating in an internet riot of glee over a site called Dimly-Lit Meals
for One - "heartbreaking images of one man's home cooking gone wrong":
the cult of the execrable food photograph. ...'

http://dimlylitmealsforone.tumblr.com/

..........................

Sickening enough staring at a pan of the bloody stuff without documenting it
for posterity.

But thanks

omega

........................

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