Discussion:
New HMRC Postcode(s) do not exist!
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Martin Brown
2014-12-22 10:00:44 UTC
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Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)

The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.

http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode

Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Jeff
2014-12-22 10:08:48 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
The postcodes do exist; the BX code is a non-geographic one that does
not relate to a specific address. a bit like an 0845 phone no. Other
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.

Jeff
Martin Brown
2014-12-22 10:38:39 UTC
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Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
The postcodes do exist; the BX code is a non-geographic one that does
not relate to a specific address. a bit like an 0845 phone no. Other
It should still show up in the Royal Mail postcode database as having a
legitimate owner otherwise how can you have any confidence in sending
important time critical mail to an address *flagged* as invalid?
Post by Jeff
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
It seems remarkably dumb to have postcodes with no visible owners!

If you look up an 0845 number on the net you generally get some info. If
you look up BX1* on the net you have to work hard to find any! eg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_postcode_areas_in_the_United_Kingdom#BX
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Jeff
2014-12-22 10:51:06 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Post by Jeff
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
It seems remarkably dumb to have postcodes with no visible owners!
If you look up an 0845 number on the net you generally get some info. If
you look up BX1* on the net you have to work hard to find any! eg.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_postcode_areas_in_the_United_Kingdom#BX
Plenty of info in a Google search on BX1 and even from the very wikki
page that you quote (but did not read):

"BX[edit]

The non-geographic postcode area BX has been introduced for addresses
which do not include a locality, this allows large organisations
long-term flexibility as to where they receive their mail. This postcode
area is used by Lloyds TSB (BX1 1LT) and the VAT Central Unit of HM
Revenue and Customs (BX5 5AT)."

Jeff
Martin Brown
2014-12-22 11:32:23 UTC
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Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
Post by Jeff
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
It seems remarkably dumb to have postcodes with no visible owners!
If you look up an 0845 number on the net you generally get some info. If
you look up BX1* on the net you have to work hard to find any! eg.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_postcode_areas_in_the_United_Kingdom#BX
Plenty of info in a Google search on BX1 and even from the very wikki
"BX[edit]
The non-geographic postcode area BX has been introduced for addresses
which do not include a locality, this allows large organisations
long-term flexibility as to where they receive their mail. This postcode
area is used by Lloyds TSB (BX1 1LT) and the VAT Central Unit of HM
Revenue and Customs (BX5 5AT)."
I did read it. The point is that a non-geographic *POSTCODE* is about as
conceptually flawed a product as you can ever hope to construct.

Any typo or mistake results in a total misdirection with no hope of the
mistake being corrected by sorters or posties local knowledge!

The postcode should check out in the Royal Mail database if it actually
exists as a valid entity saying who the owner is even if the geographic
location cannot be determined!

It should not code come back as "Invalid" or "not found". The stupid
halfwits have allocated these codes their database should include them!
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Jeff
2014-12-22 13:02:24 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
I did read it. The point is that a non-geographic *POSTCODE* is about as
conceptually flawed a product as you can ever hope to construct.
It is not "conceptually flawed" in any way, a postcode is nothing more
than that, a code that relates to a delivery destination, there is
nothing inherent on a postcode that requires it to be decodable to a
specific geographical location by the sender.
Post by Martin Brown
Any typo or mistake results in a total misdirection with no hope of the
mistake being corrected by sorters or posties local knowledge!
I assume that you would be sensible enough to write the full address on
the envelope not just the post code then I would have thought that:
HM Revenue & Customs
VAT Controller
VAT Central Unit
BX5 5AT
would have been enough to get it to the correct destination even if the
post code was wrong.
Post by Martin Brown
The postcode should check out in the Royal Mail database if it actually
exists as a valid entity saying who the owner is even if the geographic
location cannot be determined!
It should not code come back as "Invalid" or "not found". The stupid
halfwits have allocated these codes their database should include them!
But who actually checks the postcode against the database when given the
address to reply to? Very few people I suspect. Mostly it is used either
to find your own or a post code that you don't have from an address.

It might be irritating to if you are trying to find out where the VAT
Central Unit is actually based from the postcode, but that is something
that you don't need to know!!

Jeff
Martin Brown
2014-12-22 13:28:30 UTC
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Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
I did read it. The point is that a non-geographic *POSTCODE* is about as
conceptually flawed a product as you can ever hope to construct.
It is not "conceptually flawed" in any way, a postcode is nothing more
than that, a code that relates to a delivery destination, there is
nothing inherent on a postcode that requires it to be decodable to a
specific geographical location by the sender.
It doesn't need to be decodable to a geographic location but you do want
to be very sure that it is to the right destination where non-delivery
or delays could result in financial penalties.

What I am complaining about is that the Royal Mail database gives Not
Found or Invalid as its response to these apparently *VALID* postcodes.
Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
Any typo or mistake results in a total misdirection with no hope of the
mistake being corrected by sorters or posties local knowledge!
I assume that you would be sensible enough to write the full address on
HM Revenue & Customs
VAT Controller
VAT Central Unit
BX5 5AT
would have been enough to get it to the correct destination even if the
post code was wrong.
Try telling that to HMRC the correspondence address was literally

HM REVENUE AND CUSTOMS
.
BX1 1AS

Would you trust *that* on its own as a valid postal address?

The . was real and on a line by itself.
Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
The postcode should check out in the Royal Mail database if it actually
exists as a valid entity saying who the owner is even if the geographic
location cannot be determined!
It should not code come back as "Invalid" or "not found". The stupid
halfwits have allocated these codes their database should include them!
But who actually checks the postcode against the database when given the
address to reply to? Very few people I suspect. Mostly it is used either
to find your own or a post code that you don't have from an address.
It might be irritating to if you are trying to find out where the VAT
Central Unit is actually based from the postcode, but that is something
that you don't need to know!!
But you do need to know that you are sending time critical documents to
the right place and when according to their supplied postcode their
address officially does not exist this is not very professional is it?
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Jeff
2014-12-22 14:24:33 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
But you do need to know that you are sending time critical documents to
the right place and when according to their supplied postcode their
address officially does not exist this is not very professional is it?
If it is that critical you would be sending it special delivery and you
would have proof that it had arrived safely.

HMRC have given you the address so why would you doubt its authenticity?
It is also very easy to verify the Central VAT Unit's postcode on line,
just put HMRC BX5 into Google you will find it has been BX5 5AT since
Sept 2008. lots of hits.

Jeff
Alex Heney
2014-12-22 21:57:08 UTC
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2014 11:32:23 +0000, Martin Brown
Post by Martin Brown
Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
Post by Jeff
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
It seems remarkably dumb to have postcodes with no visible owners!
If you look up an 0845 number on the net you generally get some info. If
you look up BX1* on the net you have to work hard to find any! eg.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_postcode_areas_in_the_United_Kingdom#BX
Plenty of info in a Google search on BX1 and even from the very wikki
"BX[edit]
The non-geographic postcode area BX has been introduced for addresses
which do not include a locality, this allows large organisations
long-term flexibility as to where they receive their mail. This postcode
area is used by Lloyds TSB (BX1 1LT) and the VAT Central Unit of HM
Revenue and Customs (BX5 5AT)."
I did read it. The point is that a non-geographic *POSTCODE* is about as
conceptually flawed a product as you can ever hope to construct.
Not really, because the only people who need to know where it is are
the post office, and they will know.
Post by Martin Brown
Any typo or mistake results in a total misdirection with no hope of the
mistake being corrected by sorters or posties local knowledge!
The postcode should check out in the Royal Mail database if it actually
exists as a valid entity saying who the owner is even if the geographic
location cannot be determined!
It *will* check out in their database.

Just not in the part of it they offer public access to.
--
Alex Heney, Global Villager
In God we trust; all else we walk through.
To reply by email, my address is alexDOTheneyATgmailDOTcom
Jeff
2014-12-22 10:53:14 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
The postcodes do exist; the BX code is a non-geographic one that does
not relate to a specific address. a bit like an 0845 phone no. Other
It should still show up in the Royal Mail postcode database as having a
legitimate owner otherwise how can you have any confidence in sending
important time critical mail to an address *flagged* as invalid?
Post by Jeff
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
It seems remarkably dumb to have postcodes with no visible owners!
No different to a PO Box number, which is what I suspect that BX stands for.

Jeff
Judith
2014-12-22 15:56:24 UTC
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2014 10:38:39 +0000, Martin Brown
<|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:

<snip>
Post by Martin Brown
If
you look up BX1* on the net you have to work hard to find any! eg.
Not really : put in postcode BX1 in to Google. What do you get as the first
entry?

BX1 1LT
The non-geographic postcode area BX has been introduced for addresses which do
not include a locality, this allows large organisations long-term flexibility
as to where they receive their mail. This postcode area is used by Lloyds TSB
(BX1 1LT) and the VAT Central Unit of HM Revenue and Customs (BX5 5AT).
List of postcode areas in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_postcode_areas_in_the_United_Kingdom
CD
2016-04-14 03:07:46 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
The postcodes do exist; the BX code is a non-geographic one that does
not relate to a specific address. a bit like an 0845 phone no. Other
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
And yet sending a letter from overseas to HMRC at BX9 1AU fails because the postcode is not on the database and the address is insufficient.
Jeff
2016-04-14 09:16:12 UTC
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Post by CD
Post by Jeff
The postcodes do exist; the BX code is a non-geographic one that does
not relate to a specific address. a bit like an 0845 phone no. Other
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
And yet sending a letter from overseas to HMRC at BX9 1AU fails because the postcode is not on the database and the address is insufficient.
Why would it fail, as long as you put United Kingdom in the address once
it gets to the UK Post Office they know where to send it?

Letter from overseas get delivered with far less of an address, one from
Germany got delivered last xmas with just 'England' as the address!!!

Jeff
R. Mark Clayton
2016-04-14 10:42:42 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jeff
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
The postcodes do exist; the BX code is a non-geographic one that does
not relate to a specific address. a bit like an 0845 phone no. Other
companies use them as well as HMRC. So tying to find where the letter is
going from the Royal Mail public database won't work.
Jeff
As well as national non geographic ones there are virtual geographic ones - e.g. for PO Boxes, such as M60 1BZ that my company rented from 1989 - ~2008. You can also have them for major addressees such as banks and the town hall.
Simon Mason
2014-12-22 10:11:40 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
Probably still struggling with deleting "Humberside" from the database after 19 years.

http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/main-topics/general-news/red-letter-day-as-royal-mail-admits-humberside-doesn-t-exist-1-6869844

--

Simon Mason
n***@gmail.com
2014-12-22 12:12:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Send a test item recorded delivery and track it, however the destination might be regional.
z***@gmail.com
2015-02-19 12:50:40 UTC
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Self Assessment
HM Revenue and Customs
BX9 1AS
United Kingdom

this is the correct address.
tim.....
2015-02-20 15:41:20 UTC
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Post by z***@gmail.com
Self Assessment
HM Revenue and Customs
BX9 1AS
United Kingdom
this is the correct address.
do you mean because you can't find it on a map

Royal Mail have recently started to give large recipients of mai,l postcodes
which don't resolve down to a geographical location.

This is obviously one of those

tim
JNugent
2015-02-20 21:34:09 UTC
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Post by tim.....
Post by z***@gmail.com
Self Assessment
HM Revenue and Customs
BX9 1AS
United Kingdom
this is the correct address.
do you mean because you can't find it on a map
Royal Mail have recently started to give large recipients of mai,l
postcodes which don't resolve down to a geographical location.
This is obviously one of those
tim
That's been happening for decades.

L69 (a non-geographical Liverpool code used for various large recipients
of mail in various parts of the city and environs) has been in use for
at least thirty years.

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L_postcode_area>
n***@gmail.com
2015-02-20 17:21:41 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
You can rent PO Boxes. They have not very geographic post codes - mine was M60 1BZ. Large users (like banks and the council) had them too, but associated with a street address, nevertheless they also had a real post code.
d***@googlemail.com
2015-03-20 15:36:44 UTC
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Hi

Although this postcode doesn't exist, all communications with HMRC are diverted to CF14 8JS in Cardiff. HMRC will deal with them and it takes up to 9 weeks to do so.
Mrcheerful
2015-03-20 16:20:21 UTC
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Post by d***@googlemail.com
Hi
Although this postcode doesn't exist, all communications with HMRC are diverted to CF14 8JS in Cardiff. HMRC will deal with them and it takes up to 9 weeks to do so.
The postcode is an internal one for the PO box system, it does exist as
a street address and resolves to LLanishen in cardiff (where the PO
sorting place is.)
Jeff
2015-03-20 17:20:40 UTC
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Post by Mrcheerful
The postcode is an internal one for the PO box system, it does exist as
a street address and resolves to LLanishen in cardiff (where the PO
sorting place is.)
That is HMRC at Ty Glas not the PO.

Jeff
Jeff
2015-03-20 17:18:53 UTC
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Post by d***@googlemail.com
Hi
Although this postcode doesn't exist, all communications with HMRC are diverted to CF14 8JS in Cardiff. HMRC will deal with them and it takes up to 9 weeks to do so.
More likely the central HMRC post depot in Bradford.

Jeff
m***@gmail.com
2016-01-17 14:33:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Royal Mail do not allow tracking facility without a town , so you can not get proof of delivery and HMRC can lose your paperwork !
n***@gmail.com
2016-10-13 07:42:44 UTC
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"Royal Mail do not allow tracking facility without a town" -

WRONG.
c***@gmail.com
2016-02-04 12:14:27 UTC
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Good morning,

I have received a communication and like you have found the Post Code does not exist. Interestingly the Tax Ref carries the last 3 alpha-numeric employer code, but not completely right. Also the would be tax code is not in the correct format (2 alph, followed by 6 numer and 1 alpha.

I strongly suspect that this is a fraudulent notification and I would notify you local Tax Office.
R. Mark Clayton
2016-10-13 11:37:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
It is one of Royal Mail's non geographic post codes.

You won't find my old PO Box (M60 1BZ) either, but they both 'exist'.
c***@gmail.com
2018-10-26 12:41:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Trying to send off an urgent self assessment to bx9 1lz.
Royal mail on-line postal service have rejected postcode stating "Recipient postcode could not be found."
Nothing on-line to give me the full address.
Will have to go out especially to buy a book of stamps. Idiotic.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-10-26 13:35:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Trying to send off an urgent self assessment to bx9 1lz.
Royal mail on-line postal service have rejected postcode stating "Recipient postcode could not be found."
Nothing on-line to give me the full address.
Will have to go out especially to buy a book of stamps. Idiotic.
You should have simply sent it to the address given.

BX9 1BX and similar are artificial post codes and are not on the Royal
Mail database. It’s a mail handling facility operated by HMRC in
Bexley, Kent. Letters are opened and scanned and electronically
dispatched to other HMRC offices
The Peeler
2018-10-26 15:39:44 UTC
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2018 06:35:38 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
You should have simply sent it to the address given.
BX9 1BX and similar are artificial post codes and are not on the Royal
Mail database. It’s a mail handling facility operated by HMRC in
Bexley, Kent. Letters are opened and scanned and electronically
dispatched to other HMRC offices
Source ...other than your blooming psychotic "mind", dreckserb Razovic? <BG>
--
Dumb anal serb peasant Goran Razovic and her "Latin" she learned from her
limey priests:
"Caco ergo sum."
MID: <***@4ax.com>
e***@gmail.com
2018-12-04 18:38:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
JNugent
2018-12-05 01:43:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by e***@gmail.com
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
Lots of public and other important buildings have official postcodes
which don't actually exist and cannot be traced on a satnav, but which
work to their intended purpose at the sorting office. This is usually
the case where the building deals with a lot of mail.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-12-05 11:49:39 UTC
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Post by JNugent
Post by e***@gmail.com
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
Lots of public and other important buildings have official postcodes
which don't actually exist and cannot be traced on a satnav, but which
work to their intended purpose at the sorting office. This is usually
the case where the building deals with a lot of mail.
Yes I had one for a couple of decades, but guess what, you can't give to government aganecies like HMRC...
Martin Brown
2018-12-05 14:04:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Τη Δευτέρα, 22 Δεκεμβρίου 2014 - 12:00:48 μ.μ. UTC+2, ο χρήστης Martin
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that
its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they
have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
Lots of public and other important buildings have official postcodes
which don't actually exist and cannot be traced on a satnav, but which
work to their intended purpose at the sorting office. This is usually
the case where the building deals with a lot of mail.
Then they should be in the BT postcode database but without a physical
location specified as "Government Use - non-Geographic". The postcode
needs to check out as valid even if it has no well defined location (a
fiction if ever there was one since the PO have to deliver mail to it).

Otherwise how can you tell if you are sending a reply into oblivion?
HMRC is close to that anyway in terms of time taken to repy.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
JNugent
2018-12-05 15:22:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Martin Brown
Post by JNugent
Τη Δευτέρα, 22 Δεκεμβρίου 2014 - 12:00:48 μ.μ. UTC+2, ο χρήστης
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that
its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they
have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
Lots of public and other important buildings have official postcodes
which don't actually exist and cannot be traced on a satnav, but which
work to their intended purpose at the sorting office. This is usually
the case where the building deals with a lot of mail.
Then they should be in the BT postcode database but without a physical
location specified as "Government Use - non-Geographic". The postcode
needs to check out as valid even if it has no well defined location (a
fiction if ever there was one since the PO have to deliver mail to it).
Royal Mail identify the mail at the sorting office (it's their baby) for
bulk delivery. These virtual postcodes exist only to make Royal Mail's
task easier and more efficient
Post by Martin Brown
Otherwise how can you tell if you are sending a reply into oblivion?
If you are replying to a company or public authority, you know the
postcoe is real because they have told you about it. How would you know
that *any* postcode is real?
Post by Martin Brown
HMRC is close to that anyway in terms of time taken to repy.
It isn't limited to public-sector buildings

Mail-order companies (for instance) sometimes have bespoke postcodes,
located within the area of a "real" postcode district. They aren't
geographic and could even move with the company if it were to move its
own location.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-12-05 18:13:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Martin Brown
Post by JNugent
Τη Δευτέρα, 22 Δεκεμβρίου 2014 - 12:00:48 μ.μ. UTC+2, ο χρήστης
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that
its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they
have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
Lots of public and other important buildings have official postcodes
which don't actually exist and cannot be traced on a satnav, but which
work to their intended purpose at the sorting office. This is usually
the case where the building deals with a lot of mail.
Then they should be in the BT postcode database but without a physical
location specified as "Government Use - non-Geographic". The postcode
needs to check out as valid even if it has no well defined location (a
fiction if ever there was one since the PO have to deliver mail to it).
Royal Mail identify the mail at the sorting office (it's their baby) for
bulk delivery. These virtual postcodes exist only to make Royal Mail's
task easier and more efficient
Post by Martin Brown
Otherwise how can you tell if you are sending a reply into oblivion?
If you are replying to a company or public authority, you know the
postcoe is real because they have told you about it. How would you know
that *any* postcode is real?
Post by Martin Brown
HMRC is close to that anyway in terms of time taken to repy.
It isn't limited to public-sector buildings
Mail-order companies (for instance) sometimes have bespoke postcodes,
located within the area of a "real" postcode district. They aren't
geographic and could even move with the company if it were to move its
own location.
Indeed and moving office (only ten doors) is why we got one (M60). OTOH it proved to be convenient, especially when visiting shows, because you could give cards out with the PO box address and not have salesmen turn up unannounced, so we kept it Conversely when giving cards to customers these had the impressive street address (Clayton House, Piccadilly, Manchester...).

You can have stuff delivered to premises served by the sorting office the box is in (or just go and collect it), but to have it sent anywhere else is expensive and they keep messing it up.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-12-05 18:24:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Dec 2018 10:13:36 -0800 (PST), "R. Mark Clayton"
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by JNugent
Post by Martin Brown
Post by JNugent
?? ???????, 22 ?????????? 2014 - 12:00:48 ?.?. UTC+2, ? ???????
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that
its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they
have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
Lots of public and other important buildings have official postcodes
which don't actually exist and cannot be traced on a satnav, but which
work to their intended purpose at the sorting office. This is usually
the case where the building deals with a lot of mail.
Then they should be in the BT postcode database but without a physical
location specified as "Government Use - non-Geographic". The postcode
needs to check out as valid even if it has no well defined location (a
fiction if ever there was one since the PO have to deliver mail to it).
Royal Mail identify the mail at the sorting office (it's their baby) for
bulk delivery. These virtual postcodes exist only to make Royal Mail's
task easier and more efficient
Post by Martin Brown
Otherwise how can you tell if you are sending a reply into oblivion?
If you are replying to a company or public authority, you know the
postcoe is real because they have told you about it. How would you know
that *any* postcode is real?
Post by Martin Brown
HMRC is close to that anyway in terms of time taken to repy.
It isn't limited to public-sector buildings
Mail-order companies (for instance) sometimes have bespoke postcodes,
located within the area of a "real" postcode district. They aren't
geographic and could even move with the company if it were to move its
own location.
Indeed and moving office (only ten doors) is why we got one (M60). OTOH it proved to be convenient, especially when visiting shows, because you could give cards out with the PO box address and not have salesmen turn up unannounced, so we kept it Conversely when giving cards to customers these had the impressive street address (Clayton House, Piccadilly, Manchester...).
Er, what could POSSIBLY be 'impressive' about a Manchester address,
wack?
Sick old nazoid pedo Andrew "Andrzej" Baron (aka "Shitsack Moishe Goldberg")
2018-12-05 19:59:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>,
A shiteating cowardly nazoid sub-louse PEDO named Andrew "Andrzej"
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Er, what could POSSIBLY be 'impressive' about a Manchester address,
wack?
Er, why don't you stop raping two year olds, pedo Andrzej?
The Peeler
2018-12-05 20:04:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 05 Dec 2018 10:24:34 -0800, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Indeed and moving office (only ten doors) is why we got one (M60). OTOH
it proved to be convenient, especially when visiting shows, because you
could give cards out with the PO box address and not have salesmen turn
up unannounced, so we kept it Conversely when giving cards to customers
these had the impressive street address (Clayton House, Piccadilly,
Manchester...).
Er, what could POSSIBLY be 'impressive' about a Manchester address,
wack?
How could a psychopath like you possibly understand, you psychopathic wack!
--
sully to stinking Goran Razovic, our resident psychopath (aka "The Rectum"):
"frankly you're a dingleberry on usenet's ass"
MID: <be3854ef-b0ea-4bfa-b002-***@g5g2000pbp.googlegroups.com>
Martin Brown
2018-12-05 20:11:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Martin Brown
Post by JNugent
Τη Δευτέρα, 22 Δεκεμβρίου 2014 - 12:00:48 μ.μ. UTC+2, ο χρήστης
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode
Seems to me like a supremely stupid approach for a government department
to use a blank reply to address with a solitary postcode which fails
against the Royal Mail national database of valid postcodes.
When recently tried posting to a Bx code of HMRC . I discovered that
its not an address specific code(maybe for security issues) but they
have a certain address for all mailing purposes. For example
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/hm-revenue-customs/contact/couriers
Lots of public and other important buildings have official postcodes
which don't actually exist and cannot be traced on a satnav, but
which work to their intended purpose at the sorting office. This is
usually the case where the building deals with a lot of mail.
Then they should be in the BT postcode database but without a physical
location specified as "Government Use - non-Geographic". The postcode
needs to check out as valid even if it has no well defined location (a
fiction if ever there was one since the PO have to deliver mail to it).
Royal Mail identify the mail at the sorting office (it's their baby) for
bulk delivery. These virtual postcodes exist only to make Royal Mail's
task easier and more efficient
Post by Martin Brown
Otherwise how can you tell if you are sending a reply into oblivion?
If you are replying to a company or public authority, you know the
postcoe is real because they have told you about it. How would you know
that *any* postcode is real?
I generally look it up if the thing being sent is important.
Post by JNugent
Post by Martin Brown
HMRC is close to that anyway in terms of time taken to repy.
It isn't limited to public-sector buildings
 Mail-order companies (for instance) sometimes have bespoke postcodes,
located within the area of a "real" postcode district. They aren't
geographic and could even move with the company if it were to move its
own location.
Even so it the postcode has been issued it should be in the PO postcode
database even if it is tagged as "non-Geographic".
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Peter Parry
2018-12-06 15:20:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Martin Brown
Here is an interesting one. HMRC are now using invalid postcodes!
(ie does not appear at all on the Royal Mail national database)
The malformed one I saw was HMRC . BX1 1AS (sic) which quite literally
does not exist! Try it and see. There are apparently others.
They are not malformed nor are they invalid. For a list see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postcodes_in_the_United_Kingdom#Non-geographic_codes
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