Discussion:
The epitome of British arrogance
Add Reply
MM
2018-11-06 11:46:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.

"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"

Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html

MM
Dan S. MacAbre
2018-11-06 11:55:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
I think that if Europeans stood any chance of being as united as they
ought to be before we wholeheartedly threw in our lot with them, it
would have already happened naturally. As things stand, I can't help
thinking that there is a lot to be said for 'watching from the
sidelines' :-)
MM
2018-11-07 10:30:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
I think that if Europeans stood any chance of being as united as they
ought to be before we wholeheartedly threw in our lot with them, it
would have already happened naturally. As things stand, I can't help
thinking that there is a lot to be said for 'watching from the
sidelines' :-)
Like we did in the 1930s, leaving us totally unprepared for war?

MM
Dan S. MacAbre
2018-11-07 10:34:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
I think that if Europeans stood any chance of being as united as they
ought to be before we wholeheartedly threw in our lot with them, it
would have already happened naturally. As things stand, I can't help
thinking that there is a lot to be said for 'watching from the
sidelines' :-)
Like we did in the 1930s, leaving us totally unprepared for war?
MM
Maybe we should have continued watching from the sidelines? ISTM that
we didn't get much out of it, other than a nice warm feeling.
MM
2018-11-08 10:09:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Maybe we should have continued watching from the sidelines? ISTM that
we didn't get much out of it, other than a nice warm feeling.
We couldn't. We were in a formalised Anglo-Polish Alliance from 1939.
We pledged to support Poland in the event of German aggression.

MM
Farmer Giles
2018-11-06 14:40:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
So I take it that you'll be moving back to Germany when we leave the EU?
R. Mark Clayton
2018-11-06 16:42:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
The Germans had their Bismark constitution, but as it gave the military a say in government there was always a 'war party' round the cabinet table, with predictable results. Japan had the same problem.

The US [re]wrote both their constitutions after WWII, probably a good idea as the US one has endured over two centuries.

Some British arrogance is I suppose inevitable - we haven't had extra constitutional change of government since 1688 nor a violent change since ~1648 and no foreign power has overrun England since 1066.

Compare say France over the last 250 years: -

One monarchy, restored twice.
Two empires, one briefly restored.
Five republics
A directory.
A convention
A revolution
A "reign of terror" during a period of near anarchy.
Four complete or partial foreign occupations, some lasting years.

But then the French aren't arrogant at all...
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-11-06 17:22:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 6 Nov 2018 08:42:46 -0800 (PST), "R. Mark Clayton"
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
The Germans had their Bismark constitution, but as it gave the military a say in government there was always a 'war party' round the cabinet table, with predictable results. Japan had the same problem.
The US [re]wrote both their constitutions after WWII, probably a good idea as the US one has endured over two centuries.
The US 'constitution' has never been rewritten. It has been amended
something like 25 times, though.
The Peeler
2018-11-06 20:29:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 06 Nov 2018 09:22:55 -0800, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
The US 'constitution' has never been rewritten. It has been amended
something like 25 times, though.
NO constitution needs as many amendments as your brain would need,
psychopath!
--
"GB" adressing poor dumb anal Razovic:
"You really are painfully stupid, as well as deranged."
MID: <pcf5l1$1l8$***@dont-email.me>
Paul Pot
2018-11-06 17:31:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and
Matussek was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she
surprised him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European
constitution. Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a
bad idea if the European community of nations agrees on a few
foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-make-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
British arrogance, coming from a German? I'd say PKB!
--
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-11-06 17:50:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Pot
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and
Matussek was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she
surprised him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European
constitution. Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a
bad idea if the European community of nations agrees on a few
foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-m
ake-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
British arrogance, coming from a German? I'd say PKB!
No; one example of British arrogance is that after calling it Beijing on the
news, once the Tiananmen Square event had taken place in 1989, the BBC shit
reverted to calling it Peking.

What security service twat enforced that rule?

I bet they got a knighthood for doing so, and the backing of the masonic
Daily Telegraph.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-11-06 18:09:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 06 Nov 2018 17:50:36 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Paul Pot
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and
Matussek was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she
surprised him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European
constitution. Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a
bad idea if the European community of nations agrees on a few
foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can live
in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-m
ake-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
British arrogance, coming from a German? I'd say PKB!
No; one example of British arrogance is that after calling it Beijing on the
news, once the Tiananmen Square event had taken place in 1989, the BBC shit
reverted to calling it Peking.
What security service twat enforced that rule?
I bet they got a knighthood for doing so, and the backing of the masonic
Daily Telegraph.
They SHOULD have, for shitting on your slant eyed commie friends,
tavarishch soup ladle!
The Peeler
2018-11-06 20:26:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 06 Nov 2018 10:09:15 -0800, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
No; one example of British arrogance is that after calling it Beijing on the
news, once the Tiananmen Square event had taken place in 1989, the BBC shit
reverted to calling it Peking.
What security service twat enforced that rule?
I bet they got a knighthood for doing so, and the backing of the masonic
Daily Telegraph.
They SHOULD have, for shitting on your slant eyed commie friends,
tavarishch soup ladle!
The entire WORLD keeps shitting on YOU, psychopathic swine! It's your very
raison d'être!
--
Anal Razovic's poem about the most importent thing in her "life":
"Shite, shite, glorious shite
Nothing quite like it to hide out of sight
So follow me follow, down to the hollow
And there let me wallow in glorious shite"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
Paul Pot
2018-11-07 17:43:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Pot
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes
about an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The
ambassador was hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of
honor and Matussek was on hand to make a toast to the author. In
response, she surprised him by asking what he thought of the idea
of a European constitution. Matussek answered by saying it's
probably not such a bad idea if the European community of nations
agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People. However,
we're still expecting the EU to make compromises on our Brexit
decision. We may be arrogant, but our hypocrisy blares across the
world like a foghorn. After Brexit, it will be heard as a signal to
avoid what lies beyond, lest there be monsters. Meanwhile we can
live in splendid isolation on our uppers while we contemplate which
drawbridge to pull up next.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/brexit-talks-watching-a-country-m
ake-a-fool-of-itself-a-1234143.html
MM
British arrogance, coming from a German? I'd say PKB!
No
<snip>

*Splutter!*
--
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
The Todal
2018-11-07 14:10:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.

I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
Joe
2018-11-07 14:20:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:10:11 +0000
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.'
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least
offended if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually
have an unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one".
We don't need a constitution.

The USA has one, and very well-known world-wide it is. But it doesn't
stop the various levels of US government from trampling all over it
when they choose, so why would a written constitution help us? It would
only be ignored by lawyers and judges, just as the Maastricht Treaty
is ignored when inconvenient.
--
Joe
Dan S. MacAbre
2018-11-07 14:37:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:10:11 +0000
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.'
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least
offended if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually
have an unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one".
We don't need a constitution.
Do you think we could do with something protecting free speech, at least
in principle?

God knows what we'd end up with if one was written nowadays.
Post by Joe
The USA has one, and very well-known world-wide it is. But it doesn't
stop the various levels of US government from trampling all over it
when they choose, so why would a written constitution help us? It would
only be ignored by lawyers and judges, just as the Maastricht Treaty
is ignored when inconvenient.
Joe
2018-11-07 16:31:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:37:46 +0000
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Joe
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:10:11 +0000
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.'
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least
offended if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits
actually have an unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a
written one".
We don't need a constitution.
Do you think we could do with something protecting free speech, at
least in principle?
How would that work? I have free speech, your tongue will get you into
trouble one day, he commits hate crimes. Any kind of assertion that we
do not live among saints in the best of all possible worlds can now be
deemed a 'hate crime'.
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
God knows what we'd end up with if one was written nowadays.
I'm making the point that it doesn't matter. If it was written last
week we'd have lawyers saying that it's an old document that isn't
relevant today, as if such old-fashioned things as honesty and decency
and keeping one's promises were no longer important.
--
Joe
Incubus
2018-11-07 17:19:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:37:46 +0000
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Joe
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:10:11 +0000
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.'
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least
offended if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits
actually have an unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a
written one".
We don't need a constitution.
Do you think we could do with something protecting free speech, at
least in principle?
How would that work? I have free speech, your tongue will get you into
trouble one day, he commits hate crimes. Any kind of assertion that we
do not live among saints in the best of all possible worlds can now be
deemed a 'hate crime'.
I think we need the removal of 'hate' offences and offences concerning
insulting language.
Post by Joe
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
God knows what we'd end up with if one was written nowadays.
I'm making the point that it doesn't matter. If it was written last
week we'd have lawyers saying that it's an old document that isn't
relevant today, as if such old-fashioned things as honesty and decency
and keeping one's promises were no longer important.
Freedom of speech doesn't assist Americans as much as one might think. They
might be able to say things in public and on the Internet without being
harassed by the state but private companies can simply remove any content that
doesn't confirm to their 'community standards'. It is free speech in its
published form that is most dangerous and that is why the Internet is being
restricted.

It makes me laugh how out of touch politicians refer to the Internet of the
1990s as some form of 'wild west'. We had much greater freedom of speech - as
near total as can be - and it didn't harm anyone. In fact, the Internet was a
much better place then in terms of communication. Facebook, Twitter and the
like have simplified communication to an appalling extent and the
infrastructure now serves the needs of big business rather than people.

Of course, there were a greater proportion of people who were either in higher
education or had some form of technical skill back then.
Dan S. MacAbre
2018-11-07 19:27:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:37:46 +0000
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Joe
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:10:11 +0000
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.'
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least
offended if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits
actually have an unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a
written one".
We don't need a constitution.
Do you think we could do with something protecting free speech, at
least in principle?
How would that work? I have free speech, your tongue will get you into
trouble one day, he commits hate crimes. Any kind of assertion that we
do not live among saints in the best of all possible worlds can now be
deemed a 'hate crime'.
I don't know how it would work in any technical sense, but it would be
nice to have it at least codified somewhere :-) When I was a lad, we'd
say things like "it's a free country," or "we have free speech in this
country." Usually when we'd annoyed someone. I'm not sure what "it's a
free country" actually means, if anything; but "we have free speech"
seems a bit more explicit. But now I'm not sure we ever had. Is it
actually 'written anywhere'? Such ideas seemed fundamental then (at
least, to me), but rather quaint nowadays.
Post by Joe
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
God knows what we'd end up with if one was written nowadays.
I'm making the point that it doesn't matter. If it was written last
week we'd have lawyers saying that it's an old document that isn't
relevant today, as if such old-fashioned things as honesty and decency
and keeping one's promises were no longer important.
Doesn't the American constitution guarantee citizens some real legal
rights regarding what they can say? Even though it doesn't protect them
from a certain amount of opprobrium if they upset anyone :-)
Joe
2018-11-07 22:25:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 19:27:33 +0000
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Joe
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 14:37:46 +0000
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Do you think we could do with something protecting free speech, at
least in principle?
How would that work? I have free speech, your tongue will get you
into trouble one day, he commits hate crimes. Any kind of assertion
that we do not live among saints in the best of all possible worlds
can now be deemed a 'hate crime'.
I don't know how it would work in any technical sense, but it would
be nice to have it at least codified somewhere :-) When I was a lad,
we'd say things like "it's a free country," or "we have free speech
in this country." Usually when we'd annoyed someone. I'm not sure
what "it's a free country" actually means, if anything; but "we have
free speech" seems a bit more explicit. But now I'm not sure we ever
had. Is it actually 'written anywhere'? Such ideas seemed
fundamental then (at least, to me), but rather quaint nowadays.
I believe the nutters who gave forth at Speakers' Corner were
constrained not to incite crime or a 'breach of the peace', which
presumably meant violence. I don't think the police had any other
interest in them.
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Joe
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
God knows what we'd end up with if one was written nowadays.
I'm making the point that it doesn't matter. If it was written last
week we'd have lawyers saying that it's an old document that isn't
relevant today, as if such old-fashioned things as honesty and
decency and keeping one's promises were no longer important.
Doesn't the American constitution guarantee citizens some real legal
rights regarding what they can say? Even though it doesn't protect
them from a certain amount of opprobrium if they upset anyone :-)
"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or
prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of
speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to
assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

But that only applies in US courts of justice, not in the Court Of The
Mob. People have lost their jobs (fairly recently, Rosanne) over saying
or writing things. Google last year:

"The engineer, James Damore, confirmed his firing in an email to
Bloomberg, saying he was terminated for “perpetuating gender
stereotypes.”"
--
Joe
MM
2018-11-08 10:11:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.

MM
JNugent
2018-11-08 16:24:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
MM
2018-11-09 12:01:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.

MM
JNugent
2018-11-09 13:55:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
MM
2018-11-10 09:24:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
How does that help your Brexit defence?

MM
JNugent
2018-11-10 16:25:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
How does that help your Brexit defence?
What are you talking about?
MM
2018-11-11 10:36:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
How does that help your Brexit defence?
What are you talking about?
You were thankful for something, so I wanted to know why.

MM
JNugent
2018-11-11 16:30:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
How does that help your Brexit defence?
What are you talking about?
You were thankful for something, so I wanted to know why.
I told you why.
MM
2018-11-12 10:27:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
How does that help your Brexit defence?
What are you talking about?
You were thankful for something, so I wanted to know why.
I told you why.
Hardly. You asked what I was talking about, so obviously you're very
confused now.

MM
JNugent
2018-11-12 11:23:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
How does that help your Brexit defence?
What are you talking about?
You were thankful for something, so I wanted to know why.
I told you why.
Hardly. You asked what I was talking about, so obviously you're very
confused now.
I asked what your silly question was supposed to mean. You still haven't
explained what it means, almost certainly because you don't know.

HTH.
MM
2018-11-13 10:45:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by The Todal
Post by MM
"In his book 'We Germans,' journalist Matthias Matussek writes about
an evening spent at the German Embassy in London. The ambassador was
hosting the writer Antonia S. Byatt as his guest of honor and Matussek
was on hand to make a toast to the author. In response, she surprised
him by asking what he thought of the idea of a European constitution.
Matussek answered by saying it's probably not such a bad idea if the
European community of nations agrees on a few foundational principles.
"Lady Byatt then said: 'You know, we British don't need a
constitution. We are the oldest democracy in the world.' She paused
briefly before continuing: 'For young countries like you Germans,
constitutions could very well be useful.' It would be almost
impossible, writes Matussek, to overstate the haughtiness and
contemptuousness that dripped from her voice. 'Essentially, she was
saying,' he writes, 'you are barbarians, you have only recently put
down your cudgels. You need the leash.'"
Brits obviously still believe we are God's Chosen People.
I'm afraid it's obvious that some of the Germans present did not
understand English irony.
I doubt if Antonia Byatt is an expert on law or politics - she's a
novelist. I don't suppose if she would have been in the least offended
if someone had replied to her "bollocks, you Brits actually have an
unwritten constitution but you'd benefit from a written one". She was
probably just making conversation in a humorous and provocative way. No
need for any insecure Krauts to take offence. Haughtiness is in the mind
of the beholder.
No. She was just an arrogant Brit.
So are you.
But not as a guest at the German, or any other, embassy.
But still arrogant, Brit or otherwise. Thanks for the prompt confirmation.
How does that help your Brexit defence?
What are you talking about?
You were thankful for something, so I wanted to know why.
I told you why.
Hardly. You asked what I was talking about, so obviously you're very
confused now.
I asked what your silly question was supposed to mean. You still haven't
explained what it means, almost certainly because you don't know.
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit, and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.

So, once again, how does it help?

MM
JNugent
2018-11-13 16:45:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?

It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
MM
2018-11-15 13:40:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?
So in other words, it's meaningless, isn't it? Like saying someone is
tall or short.
Post by JNugent
It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
So what difference has it made?

MM
JNugent
2018-11-15 16:17:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?
So in other words, it's meaningless, isn't it? Like saying someone is
tall or short.
Your question, as you confirm, was not only meaningless (thank you for
confirming that), but flew in from nowhere. It did not arise from the
discussion.
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
So what difference has it made?
Your confirmation that you are an arrogant Brit?

None at all. Everyone already knew it.
MM
2018-11-15 17:23:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?
So in other words, it's meaningless, isn't it? Like saying someone is
tall or short.
Your question, as you confirm, was not only meaningless (thank you for
confirming that), but flew in from nowhere. It did not arise from the
discussion.
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
So what difference has it made?
Your confirmation that you are an arrogant Brit?
None at all. Everyone already knew it.
And do they care?

MM
JNugent
2018-11-15 23:46:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?
So in other words, it's meaningless, isn't it? Like saying someone is
tall or short.
Your question, as you confirm, was not only meaningless (thank you for
confirming that), but flew in from nowhere. It did not arise from the
discussion.
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
So what difference has it made?
Your confirmation that you are an arrogant Brit?
None at all. Everyone already knew it.
And do they care?
Does everyone care that you are an arrogant Brit?

I don't suppose it makes much difference, if any, to many people, so the
answer is probably very close in value to "No".
MM
2018-11-16 08:59:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?
So in other words, it's meaningless, isn't it? Like saying someone is
tall or short.
Your question, as you confirm, was not only meaningless (thank you for
confirming that), but flew in from nowhere. It did not arise from the
discussion.
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
So what difference has it made?
Your confirmation that you are an arrogant Brit?
None at all. Everyone already knew it.
And do they care?
Does everyone care that you are an arrogant Brit?
I don't suppose it makes much difference, if any, to many people, so the
answer is probably very close in value to "No".
Cor! I bet dragging that answer out of you was pretty painful!

MM
JNugent
2018-11-16 14:33:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?
So in other words, it's meaningless, isn't it? Like saying someone is
tall or short.
Your question, as you confirm, was not only meaningless (thank you for
confirming that), but flew in from nowhere. It did not arise from the
discussion.
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
So what difference has it made?
Your confirmation that you are an arrogant Brit?
None at all. Everyone already knew it.
And do they care?
Does everyone care that you are an arrogant Brit?
I don't suppose it makes much difference, if any, to many people, so the
answer is probably very close in value to "No".
Cor! I bet dragging that answer out of you was pretty painful!
Not for me.

It was your frank admission of your own arrogance which must have hurt.

That, of course, is dependent on your having known what it was that you
were saying, and on reflection, perhaps that isn't a totally safe
assumption. After all, you never know what you're talking about on any
other topic.
MM
2018-11-17 10:39:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Let me couch it in terms maybe even you can understand. You expressed
your thanks for the prompt confirmation that I am, as alleged by you,
an arrogant Brit,
That's right. It *was* good of you to confirm it and I would wish to
acknowledge that. I like to be courteous when occasion demands it, and
on this occasion, it was appropriate to thank you for your frank admission.
Post by MM
and I wanted to know how this apparent revelation
helped with your defence of Brexit.
So, once again, how does it help?
Did someone - anyone - say that it did / does / might / will help with that?
So in other words, it's meaningless, isn't it? Like saying someone is
tall or short.
Your question, as you confirm, was not only meaningless (thank you for
confirming that), but flew in from nowhere. It did not arise from the
discussion.
Post by MM
Post by JNugent
It's not as though you confirmed anything everyone didn't already know,
is it?
So what difference has it made?
Your confirmation that you are an arrogant Brit?
None at all. Everyone already knew it.
And do they care?
Does everyone care that you are an arrogant Brit?
I don't suppose it makes much difference, if any, to many people, so the
answer is probably very close in value to "No".
Cor! I bet dragging that answer out of you was pretty painful!
Not for me.
It was your frank admission of your own arrogance which must have hurt.
That, of course, is dependent on your having known what it was that you
were saying, and on reflection, perhaps that isn't a totally safe
assumption. After all, you never know what you're talking about on any
other topic.
Hey, why not be even more expansive!

MM

Loading...