Discussion:
Onefor our friends in the colonies
(too old to reply)
Periander
2010-12-27 01:47:55 UTC
Permalink
Probably a re-post ...



Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and world
affairs ....
--
Regards,


Periander
GB
2010-12-27 12:12:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a vast
country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad. Maybe that's
why they are rather inward-looking?
--
Murphy's ultimate law is that if something that could go wrong doesn't,
it turns out that it would have been better if it had gone wrong.
Ret.
2010-12-27 14:25:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a vast
country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad. Maybe
that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US. In
fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a Mediterranean
climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
totallyconfused
2010-12-27 15:57:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a vast
country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad. Maybe
that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US. In
fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a Mediterranean
climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
Kev's reply is correct. However, you British must also understand
that integral to our 'culture/society/belief system' is manifest
destiny. Hence why I try to explain to the offensive and ignorant
Brit's who try to tell me my homeland 'has no culture' I simply tell
them that they don't understand it. Example: The British can not
even agree what kind political/economic model they want. (do you want
to be capitalists or socialists?) Americans are clear about our
political and economic model...we just disagree the methods to achieve
the same objective. (hence republican vs. democrat) There is
admittedly an amount of arrogance in the American psyche...'Walk
softly and carry a big stick' was not based on world domination; it
was based on 'we can do it ourselves and we will protect our borders
to do it our way' which also explains why until the mid 1940's the
USA was viewed as an isolationist nation.. So what changed? Everyone
wanted to join our gang and be like US.

Hope that helps.
TC
Periander
2010-12-27 16:14:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by totallyconfused
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography
and climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday -
beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without
leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in California
alone - with a Mediterranea
n
Post by Ret.
climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
Kev's reply is correct. However, you British must also understand
that integral to our 'culture/society/belief system' is manifest
destiny. Hence why I try to explain to the offensive and ignorant
Brit's who try to tell me my homeland 'has no culture' I simply tell
them that they don't understand it. Example: The British can not
even agree what kind political/economic model they want. (do you want
to be capitalists or socialists?) Americans are clear about our
political and economic model...we just disagree the methods to achieve
the same objective. (hence republican vs. democrat) There is
admittedly an amount of arrogance in the American psyche...'Walk
softly and carry a big stick' was not based on world domination; it
was based on 'we can do it ourselves and we will protect our borders
to do it our way' which also explains why until the mid 1940's the
USA was viewed as an isolationist nation.. So what changed? Everyone
wanted to join our gang and be like US.
Hope that helps.
TC
Thanks for that it helps explain a lot, we just thought that the
majority of Americans were semi-literate, half educated, religious
loonies with very little grasp of reality.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
dyn/content/story/2008/06/23/ST2008062300818.html
--
Regards,


Periander
GB
2010-12-27 16:19:38 UTC
Permalink
Periander wrote:

<Bit of nastiness snipped>
Post by Periander
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
dyn/content/story/2008/06/23/ST2008062300818.html
Aren't most Americans capable of posting a link without splitting it into
two, though?
--
Murphy's ultimate law is that if something that could go wrong doesn't,
it turns out that it would have been better if it had gone wrong.
David Storm
2010-12-27 16:27:20 UTC
Permalink
"GB" wrote in message news:4d18bc9b$0$2518$***@news.zen.co.uk...

Periander wrote:

<Bit of nastiness snipped>
Post by Periander
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
dyn/content/story/2008/06/23/ST2008062300818.html
Aren't most Americans capable of posting a link without splitting it into
two, though?


-----------------------

Its American software that split the link :)

Stormy
Periander
2010-12-27 16:59:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by GB
<Bit of nastiness snipped>
Well it is Christmas, aren't I allowed a little present?
--
Regards,


Periander
Steve Frith
2010-12-27 17:35:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Periander
Post by GB
<Bit of nastiness snipped>
Well it is Christmas, aren't I allowed a little present?
Here, have a pin to prick yourself with.
totallyconfused
2010-12-27 19:06:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by GB
<Bit of nastiness snipped>
Post by Periander
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
dyn/content/story/2008/06/23/ST2008062300818.html
Aren't most Americans capable of posting a link without splitting it into
two, though?
--
Murphy's ultimate law is that if something that could go wrong doesn't,
it turns out that it would have been better if it had gone wrong.
Where did I split my post into two?

And Mr. Pounder- why is 'he be Black' relevant? I don't care if he is
orange or is purple or Jewish or a good Espicipal .....Bottom line is
I disagree with him about how we manage our health care system/social
security/pensions/military interests.....I don't disagree with WHAT HE
IS TRYING TO ACHIEVE BUT THE METHODS OF IMPLEMENTATION. So again you
have proved my point. Can you say that about the UK government? That
you agree with what they are trying to achieve? What does his ethnic
origins/skin shade got to do with his mind? As a card carrying
Republican, W was worse in terms of embarrassment.

As a student in the UK in the mid 1980's, it used to really piss us
off how the British students moaned about how 'little' they were
getting 'paid' to study.....At that time I believe they were moaning
about 'all they got was a pittence-£1800 a year living expenses' that
they didn't have to pay back.

I now as a UK resident raising my children in the UK have to pay for
King's College London for my oldest...as well I should. She has had
to take out student loans to supplement what the family provides to
support to her studies and part of that burden will fall to her
personally on graduation- as it should. Next year I get the joy of
that plus a son who wishes to go to Loughbourgh to study Engineering.
It is our job as parents to teach our children to aspire as high as
possible but know that nothing in life is free. None of my education
after 17 was free....I had to pay for it all with what help my parents
and grandparents provided.

There is the difference....what are your priorities?
Rick
2010-12-27 20:10:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by totallyconfused
Post by GB
<Bit of nastiness snipped>
Post by Periander
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
dyn/content/story/2008/06/23/ST2008062300818.html
Aren't most Americans capable of posting a link without splitting it into
two, though?
--
Murphy's ultimate law is that if something that could go wrong doesn't,
it turns out that it would have been better if it had gone wrong.
Where did I split my post into two?
And Mr. Pounder- why is 'he be Black' relevant? I don't care if he is
orange or is purple or Jewish or a good Espicipal .....Bottom line is
I disagree with him about how we manage our health care system/social
security/pensions/military interests.....I don't disagree with WHAT HE
IS TRYING TO ACHIEVE BUT THE METHODS OF IMPLEMENTATION. So again you
have proved my point. Can you say that about the UK government? That
you agree with what they are trying to achieve? What does his ethnic
origins/skin shade got to do with his mind? As a card carrying
Republican, W was worse in terms of embarrassment.
As a student in the UK in the mid 1980's, it used to really piss us
off how the British students moaned about how 'little' they were
getting 'paid' to study.....At that time I believe they were moaning
about 'all they got was a pittence-£1800 a year living expenses' that
they didn't have to pay back.
I now as a UK resident raising my children in the UK have to pay for
King's College London for my oldest...as well I should. She has had
to take out student loans to supplement what the family provides to
support to her studies and part of that burden will fall to her
personally on graduation- as it should. Next year I get the joy of
that plus a son who wishes to go to Loughbourgh to study Engineering.
It is our job as parents to teach our children to aspire as high as
possible but know that nothing in life is free. None of my education
after 17 was free....I had to pay for it all with what help my parents
and grandparents provided.
There is the difference....what are your priorities?
Interestingly there was a trailer on CNBC this evening for a forthcoming
programme, I wasn't paying an awful lot of attention but from memory it said
something along the lines of 'Americans owing more money in the way of
student loans than on credit cards, could this be another huge loan bubble
about to burst?'
Mr Pounder
2010-12-27 18:06:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a vast
country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad. Maybe
that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US. In
fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a Mediterranean
climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
Kev's reply is correct. However, you British must also understand
that integral to our 'culture/society/belief system' is manifest
destiny. Hence why I try to explain to the offensive and ignorant
Brit's who try to tell me my homeland 'has no culture' I simply tell
them that they don't understand it. Example: The British can not
even agree what kind political/economic model they want. (do you want
to be capitalists or socialists?) Americans are clear about our
political and economic model...we just disagree the methods to achieve
the same objective. (hence republican vs. democrat) There is
admittedly an amount of arrogance in the American psyche...'Walk
softly and carry a big stick' was not based on world domination; it
was based on 'we can do it ourselves and we will protect our borders
to do it our way' which also explains why until the mid 1940's the
USA was viewed as an isolationist nation.. So what changed? Everyone
wanted to join our gang and be like US.

Hope that helps.
TC

Black President; joke of the western world.

Mr Pounder
harry
2010-12-27 20:18:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a vast
country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad. Maybe
that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US. In
fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a Mediterranean
climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Mike P
2010-12-27 20:21:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US.
In fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt has
never *been* out of Lancashire..

That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed the
pond with them.
--
Mike P
Meta
2010-12-28 08:03:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US.
In fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt has
never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed the
pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture. We
have Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A. You are dead wrong about
the U.S.A. not having culture. Obviously, you don't know much about
the U.S. Amazing!

I traveled to North Yorkshire just this summer and loved it. My
father began taking me around the world since I was eight years old.
harry
2010-12-28 08:42:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US.
In fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt has
never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed the
pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We
have Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.  You are dead wrong about
the U.S.A. not having culture.  Obviously, you don't know much about
the U.S.  Amazing!
I traveled to North Yorkshire just this summer and loved it.  My
father began taking me around the world since I was eight years old.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Hawaii was stolen from it's inhabitants. They want it back. The only
culture there is their's.
The Yanks keep the Hawain royal family locked up.
Mike P
2010-12-28 11:37:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on
geography and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such
a vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday
abroad. Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in
geography and climate that no matter what you might want from a
holiday - beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it
without leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in
California alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt
has never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed
the pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We have
Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures *American*? No. Of course they are not.

You have no culture of your own. You just import/steal everyone elses.
I've got plenty of relatives over there, and used to work for a company
based in Pittsburgh. I can trace my descendants back to the deputy Sherrif
of Wyoming in 1878, Robert Widdowfield. My more immediate family have
lived in the USA since 1949.

My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to come over
to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what their cultural roots
are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him doesn't even think you have
your own culture, then it appears that you are wrong.
 You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
 Obviously, you don't know much about the U.S.  Amazing!
I clearly know more about it than you.
--
Mike P
joe
2010-12-28 11:46:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Meta
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
 We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we
have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans,
etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?

How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to come
over to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what their
cultural roots are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him doesn't
even think you have your own culture, then it appears that you are
wrong.
Do you have any other people who merely have to believe something to
make it a universal truth?
 You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
What exactly do you call culture? Why does the uSa not have any culture?

--
harry
2010-12-29 15:56:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Meta
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
 We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we
have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans,
etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to come
over to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what their
cultural roots are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him doesn't
even think you have your own culture, then it appears that you are
wrong.
Do you have any other people who merely have to believe something to
make it a universal truth?
 You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
What exactly do you call culture? Why does the uSa not have any culture?
--
Because it has very little history. And it's full of immigrants.
American culture is living in wigwams and wearing moccasins etc.
But most of them were ethnically cleansed.
joe
2010-12-29 17:44:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by joe
Post by Meta
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
 We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and
we have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese,
Samoans, etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become
American?
My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to
come over to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what
their cultural roots are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him
doesn't even think you have your own culture, then it appears
that you are wrong.
Do you have any other people who merely have to believe something to
make it a universal truth?
 You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
What exactly do you call culture? Why does the uSa not have any culture?
--
Because it has very little history. And it's full of immigrants.
American culture is living in wigwams and wearing moccasins etc.
But most of them were ethnically cleansed.
So exactly how much history do you have to have before you get a
culture?

--
harry
2010-12-30 08:09:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by joe
Post by Meta
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
 We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and
we have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese,
Samoans, etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to
come over to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what
their cultural roots are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him
doesn't even think you have your own culture, then it appears
that you are wrong.
Do you have any other people who merely have to believe something to
make it a universal truth?
 You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
What exactly do you call culture? Why does the uSa not have any culture?
--
Because it has very little history.  And it's full of immigrants.
American culture is living in wigwams and wearing moccasins etc.
But most of them were ethnically cleansed.
So exactly how much history do you have to have before you get a
culture?
--- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I don't know. In the case of America probably never. You can't
establish a culture on the basis of Hollywood movies. (Which is where
most Americans get their "information" from and lifestyle guidance.)
Mike P
2010-12-29 19:54:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Meta
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
 We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we
have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans,
etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
So, by your rules, Islam is now part of British culture.

Glad we got that sorted then.
--
Mike P
joe
2010-12-29 20:08:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Meta
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
 We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and
we >> have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese,
Samoans, >> etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Post by joe
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become
American?
So, by your rules, Islam is now part of British culture.
Glad we got that sorted then.
By my rules? All I have done is ask questions. Why are you presuming
anything?

As I remember, you were full of questions about culture not so long ago.

--
Adrian
2010-12-29 20:12:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Mike P
Post by joe
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
So, by your rules, Islam is now part of British culture.
Glad we got that sorted then.
By my rules?
"They are in America, therefore they are American, surely?"
Post by joe
All I have done is ask questions. Why are you presuming anything?
As I remember, you were full of questions about culture not so long ago.
I don't recall your definition of British culture. Would you remind us?
joe
2010-12-29 20:31:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Mike P
Post by joe
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
So, by your rules, Islam is now part of British culture.
Glad we got that sorted then.
By my rules?
"They are in America, therefore they are American, surely?"
Confusing, so America does have a culture?
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
All I have done is ask questions. Why are you presuming anything?
As I remember, you were full of questions about culture not so long ago.
I don't recall your definition of British culture. Would you remind us?
Google it.

--
Mike P
2010-12-29 20:32:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Mike P
Post by joe
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
So, by your rules, Islam is now part of British culture.
Glad we got that sorted then.
By my rules?
"They are in America, therefore they are American, surely?"
Confusing
Only to you.
--
Mike P
Adrian
2010-12-29 20:34:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Mike P
Post by joe
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
So, by your rules, Islam is now part of British culture.
Glad we got that sorted then.
By my rules?
"They are in America, therefore they are American, surely?"
Confusing, so America does have a culture?
Of course it does. Kev said that he wanted a nice white New York taxi
driver because of it.

Would you have said that Britain of 2010 was even remotely similar to
Britain of 1776, let alone Britain of 1620?

(Or far, far further back, of course, assuming we regard "America" as not
starting with the Pilgrim Fathers)
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
All I have done is ask questions. Why are you presuming anything?
As I remember, you were full of questions about culture not so long ago.
I don't recall your definition of British culture. Would you remind us?
Google it.
Google Groups is fucked. You know this. Give me a rough precis.
joe
2010-12-29 20:49:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Mike P
Post by joe
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are
not.
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Mike P
Post by joe
Why? they are in america, therefore they are American surely?
How long do they have to exist in America before they become American?
So, by your rules, Islam is now part of British culture.
Glad we got that sorted then.
By my rules?
"They are in America, therefore they are American, surely?"
Confusing, so America does have a culture?
Of course it does. Kev said that he wanted a nice white New York taxi
driver because of it.
I agree, I thought America had a culture, but Harry said they didn't
and your mate Mike agreed with him.

" But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.

Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed
the
pond with them. "
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
I don't recall your definition of British culture. Would you
remind us?
Post by joe
Google it.
Google Groups is fucked. You know this. Give me a rough precis.
No, I'm not about to get side tracked again.

--
Adrian
2010-12-29 20:54:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Confusing, so America does have a culture?
Of course it does. Kev said that he wanted a nice white New York taxi
driver because of it.
I agree, I thought America had a culture, but Harry said they didn't and
your mate Mike agreed with him.
"But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
joe
2010-12-29 21:03:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Confusing, so America does have a culture?
Of course it does. Kev said that he wanted a nice white New York
taxi >> driver because of it.
Post by joe
I agree, I thought America had a culture, but Harry said they
didn't and your mate Mike agreed with him.
"But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
Nah, no difference, we are talking of ther same thing. American
culture, try not to sidestep so much.



--
Adrian
2010-12-29 21:10:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Confusing, so America does have a culture?
Of course it does. Kev said that he wanted a nice white New York
taxi driver because of it.
I agree, I thought America had a culture, but Harry said they didn't
and your mate Mike agreed with him.
"But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
Nah, no difference
I'm sure that, to you, that is indeed truly the case.
Post by joe
we are talking of ther same thing.
Mike wasn't, going by that snippet - I didn't bother reading vast swathes
of posts over the Xmas period, though.
Post by joe
American culture, try not to sidestep so much.
<shrug> I thought I just agreed with you. But there we go.
joe
2010-12-29 21:12:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Confusing, so America does have a culture?
Of course it does. Kev said that he wanted a nice white New York
taxi driver because of it.
I agree, I thought America had a culture, but Harry said they
didn't >> > and your mate Mike agreed with him.
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
"But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see
exactly >> > nothing.
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
Nah, no difference
I'm sure that, to you, that is indeed truly the case.
Ok then, what is the difference between a culture and cultur when
refering to american culture.?
Post by joe
we are talking of ther same thing.
Mike wasn't, going by that snippet - I didn't bother reading vast
swathes of posts over the Xmas period, though.
Post by joe
American culture, try not to sidestep so much.
<shrug> I thought I just agreed with you. But there we go.
--
Adrian
2010-12-29 21:29:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
Nah, no difference
I'm sure that, to you, that is indeed truly the case.
Ok then, what is the difference between a culture and cultur when
refering to american culture.?
The same as when referring to any other nation.
joe
2010-12-29 22:07:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
Nah, no difference
I'm sure that, to you, that is indeed truly the case.
Ok then, what is the difference between a culture and cultur when
refering to american culture.?
The same as when referring to any other nation.
Avoidance noted.

--
Adrian
2010-12-29 22:22:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
Nah, no difference
I'm sure that, to you, that is indeed truly the case.
Ok then, what is the difference between a culture and cultur when
refering to american culture.?
The same as when referring to any other nation.
Avoidance noted.
No avoidance at all.

If you genuinely can't distinguish between culture and a nation's
specific culture, then I feel very sorry for your limited outlook on life.
joe
2010-12-29 22:45:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
Post by joe
Post by Adrian
There is a huge difference between "culture" and "a culture".
Nah, no difference
I'm sure that, to you, that is indeed truly the case.
Ok then, what is the difference between a culture and cultur when
refering to american culture.?
The same as when referring to any other nation.
Avoidance noted.
No avoidance at all.
If you genuinely can't distinguish between culture and a nation's
specific culture, then I feel very sorry for your limited outlook on life.
However, I can see when someone is dodging the question. Why can you
not answer? There is no answer. Apart from someone being cultured, as a
simile with refined, and a countries cultural identity, but you don't
believe people can even describe that type of culture, do you.

--
Mike P
2010-12-29 23:04:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
and a countries cultural identity, but you don't
believe people can even describe that type of culture, do you.
I believe it's possible. It's just that none of you will do it. You won't/
can't. Kev won't/can't. Bod gave us a bit of a list which didn't do it..

So, come on then, describe it.
--
Mike P
joe
2010-12-29 23:46:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by joe
and a countries cultural identity, but you don't
believe people can even describe that type of culture, do you.
I believe it's possible. It's just that none of you will do it. You
won't/ can't. Kev won't/can't. Bod gave us a bit of a list which
didn't do it..
So, come on then, describe it.
First of all, tell me why America does not have a culture of its own,
and why.

--
alang
2010-12-28 12:18:07 UTC
Permalink
On 28 Dec 2010 11:37:51 GMT, Mike P
Post by Mike P
My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to come over
to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what their cultural roots
are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him doesn't even think you have
your own culture, then it appears that you are wrong.
 You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
Of course it has a culture.
Where else can you be abducted by aliens and anally probed?
Post by Mike P
 Obviously, you don't know much about the U.S.  Amazing!
I clearly know more about it than you.
harry
2010-12-28 15:12:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by alang
On 28 Dec 2010 11:37:51 GMT, Mike P
Post by Mike P
My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to come over
to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what their cultural roots
are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him doesn't even think you have
your own culture, then it appears that you are wrong.
You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
Of course it has a culture.
Where else can you be abducted by aliens and anally probed?
Post by Mike P
Obviously, you don't know much about the U.S. Amazing!
I clearly know more about it than you.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I have to say when I visited my e-friend in America, everyone I met
was incredibly kind and generous towards me. It was almost like being
a pop star!
Ret.
2010-12-28 15:27:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by alang
On 28 Dec 2010 11:37:51 GMT, Mike P
Post by Mike P
My brother-in-law and his family are from Alabama. They want to
come over to Essex to see where they orginated from, and what their
cultural roots are. Now, if someone as Nationalistic as him doesn't
even think you have your own culture, then it appears that you are
wrong.
You are dead wrong about the U.S.A. not having culture.
OK, I'll correct my statement. The USA has no culture of it's own.
Of course it has a culture.
Where else can you be abducted by aliens and anally probed?
Post by Mike P
Obviously, you don't know much about the U.S. Amazing!
I clearly know more about it than you.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I have to say when I visited my e-friend in America, everyone I met
was incredibly kind and generous towards me. It was almost like being
a pop star!
And that has also been my experience.
--
Kev
Francis Burton
2010-12-28 19:30:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by harry
I have to say when I visited my e-friend in America, everyone I met
was incredibly kind and generous towards me. It was almost like being
a pop star!
And that has also been my experience.
Even the waitresses?? ;-)

Francis
Ret.
2010-12-28 19:37:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Francis Burton
Post by Ret.
Post by harry
I have to say when I visited my e-friend in America, everyone I met
was incredibly kind and generous towards me. It was almost like
being a pop star!
And that has also been my experience.
Even the waitresses?? ;-)
Yes - especially the non-white ones (I've forgotten what the current
politically correct word is...)

--
Kev
harry
2010-12-29 16:04:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Francis Burton
Post by Ret.
Post by harry
I have to say when I visited my e-friend in America, everyone I met
was incredibly kind and generous towards me.  It was almost like being
a pop star!
And that has also been my experience.
Even the waitresses?? ;-)
Francis
Especially the waitresses. They need their tip money. They just
loved my Brit accent. You are expected to tip 20% in America. But
only for good service. I always got it. The food wasn't as bad as
I had been led to expect either. Away from Mcds that is.:-) Huge
quantities. No wonder there are so many fat gits.
Meta
2010-12-28 23:43:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on
geography and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such
a vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday
abroad. Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in
geography and climate that no matter what you might want from a
holiday - beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it
without leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in
California alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt
has never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed
the pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We have
Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures *American*? No. Of course they are not.
What culture is "American", other than the Native Americans? NONE.
The rest of us are immigrants!
Post by Mike P
You have no culture of your own. You just import/steal everyone elses.
I've got plenty of relatives over there, and used to work for a company
based in Pittsburgh. I can trace my descendants back to the deputy Sherrif
of Wyoming in 1878, Robert Widdowfield. My more immediate family have
lived in the USA since 1949.
Good Lord! Who do you think you are?


My family on my father's side started with William in 1610, England.
His son, William, was given a patent (grant) by the King of England,
for himself and eleven servants into "The Colony". He was a merchant
and a lawyer. The date was August 11, 1642. The colony's
administrator, Sir William Berkeley, granted William Hockaday 500
acres of land "lyeing on the South side of Charles River near the
Narrows being in the County of yorke bounded by Northwest by West upon
Waraney Creeke northeast by East upon the river Southeast by East
toward the Ware Creek." Two years later he was granted 1346 acres
near the narrows of the York River. Shortly thereafter he got land in
Northumberland County. He was one of the largest landholders in
Virginia.

He had a son, William Hockaday, Jr. He was one of the Tidewater
aristocracy. He died in the spring of 1670 in
New Kent, Virginia. Now here is where there is a gap. As far as my
Dad's book goes, he mentions that there is another William Hockaday
and he was a burgess in Virginia in 1748 and 1749. His great
grandfather was the above mentioned William Hockaday Jr.

Next we skip to Warwick Hockaday of Charles City County, married to
Mary. Their children were James, Elizabeth Mary, Bristow and Samuel.
Now here's where we have yet another gap. The book mentions cousins,
John, Philemon, and Edmond, and yet we don't know who therir parents'
are. Edmond is the closest I come to having a direct line from here
on out. In between all this was the Revolutionary war and the signing
of the Constitution! Captain John Hockaday and Phillip Hockaday were
mentioned as fighting in the war, but I don't know where they lie in
the family tree as my father does not have that information.

Okay, so Edmond Hockaday (born 1751 - Virginia) and his wife Martha
had a son named Edmond (born 1771 - Virginia). Edmond married Eliza
Baker. Shortly before the turn of the century, Edmond and his wife,
pulled up stakes and headed West over the Cumberland Gap to Kentucky.
According to the records, he was restless on the plantation and wanted
to see what was on the other side of the mountians. His brother, John
Hockaday, also moved to Kentucky. It mentions in the book that John
had a son named Issac Newton Hockaday who moved to Plattsburg,
Missouri.

Edmond and Eliza Hockaday have a son named Edmond H. Hockaday (born
1804 in Lexington, Kentucky). He married Margaret Taliafarro, reputed
to be of noble Italian descent. (This is the only Italian blood in my
family!) Their children were Alan, Amelia,
Edmond N., Charles Newton, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah. Six years
before the outbreak of the Civil War, the family moved from Lexington,
Kentucky to the vicinity of St. Joseph, Missouri (along with their
slaves).

"St. Joseph was the eastern end of stagecoach lines, like Butterfield,
Wells Fargo, and American Express, that linked the eastern United
States with the West. They carried freight and passengers."

Charles Newton Hockaday, the middle child of Edmond and Margaret was
born in 1837 at Old Homestaead in Lexington, Ky. When the family
moved to Missouri, they left behind the three oldest children to
manage the homestead and they took with them Charles and his three
younger sisters, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah. Charles (he was
nicknamed "Newt") had a cousin, Issac, John Hockadays' son, mentioned
earlier who founded a business hauling freight from St. Joseph to
"hell and gone" in the West. Charles (Newton) worked for three years
as a teamster for Leavenworth & Pike's Peak Express, successor to the
Hockaday line. Mostly he carried freight on the line between St. Joe
and Central city, Colorado. He married Hannah Kelsay in 1864. They
settled in the newly established Colorado Territory. There homestead
was southeast of Nederland. Charles Newton became Deputy U.S.
Marshall in 1876, based in Boulder, Co. He held this job for ten
years. He died in 1910.

Newton and Hannah had four children, Edmond, Charles, Harriett, and
Ida. Edmond Warwick was born May 17, 1867 at Balckhawk, Co. At age
nineteen he graduated from Denver University in business. He married
Grace Elvira Haight in 1894. And they had five kids. My grandpa was
the second to the youngest - Robert Newton, born 1901.
Anthony R. Gold
2010-12-29 00:35:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Meta
What culture is "American", other than the Native Americans? NONE.
The rest of us are immigrants!
The census bureau claims around 10.4% are immigrants so most are descendents
of immigrants, and that includes all of the Native Americans.

Tony
harry
2010-12-29 16:32:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on
geography and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such
a vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday
abroad. Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in
geography and climate that no matter what you might want from a
holiday - beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it
without leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in
California alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt
has never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed
the pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We have
Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures *American*? No. Of course they are not.
What culture is "American", other than the Native Americans?  NONE.
The rest of us are immigrants!
Post by Mike P
You have no culture of your own. You just import/steal everyone elses.
I've got plenty of relatives over there, and used to work for a company
based in Pittsburgh. I can trace my descendants back to the deputy Sherrif
of Wyoming in 1878, Robert Widdowfield. My more immediate family have
lived in the USA since 1949.
Good Lord!  Who do you think you are?
My family on my father's side started with William in 1610, England.
His son, William,  was given a patent (grant) by the King of England,
for himself and eleven servants into "The Colony".  He was a merchant
and a lawyer.  The date was August 11, 1642.  The colony's
administrator, Sir William Berkeley, granted William Hockaday 500
acres of land "lyeing on the South side of Charles River near the
Narrows being in the County of yorke bounded by Northwest by West upon
Waraney Creeke northeast by East upon the river Southeast by East
toward the Ware Creek."  Two years later he was granted 1346 acres
near the narrows of the York River.  Shortly thereafter he got land in
Northumberland County.  He was one of the largest landholders in
Virginia.
He had a son, William Hockaday, Jr.  He was one of the Tidewater
aristocracy.  He died in the spring of 1670 in
New Kent, Virginia.  Now here is where there is a gap.  As far as my
Dad's book goes, he mentions that there is another William Hockaday
and he was a burgess in Virginia in 1748 and 1749. His great
grandfather was the above mentioned William Hockaday Jr.
Next we skip to Warwick Hockaday of Charles City County, married to
Mary.  Their children were James, Elizabeth Mary, Bristow and Samuel.
Now here's where we have yet another gap.  The book mentions cousins,
John, Philemon, and Edmond, and yet we don't know who therir parents'
are.  Edmond is the closest I come to having a direct line from here
on out.  In between all this was the Revolutionary war and the signing
of the Constitution!  Captain John Hockaday and Phillip Hockaday were
mentioned as fighting in the war, but I don't know where they lie in
the family tree as my father does not have that information.
Okay, so Edmond Hockaday (born 1751 - Virginia) and his wife Martha
had a son named Edmond (born 1771 - Virginia).  Edmond married Eliza
Baker.  Shortly before the turn of the century, Edmond and his wife,
pulled up stakes and headed West over the Cumberland Gap to Kentucky.
According to the records, he was restless on the plantation and wanted
to see what was on the other side of the mountians.  His brother, John
Hockaday, also moved to Kentucky. It mentions in the book that John
had a son named Issac Newton Hockaday who moved to Plattsburg,
Missouri.
Edmond and Eliza Hockaday have a son named Edmond H. Hockaday (born
1804 in Lexington, Kentucky).  He married Margaret Taliafarro, reputed
to be of noble Italian descent. (This is the only Italian blood in my
family!) Their children were Alan, Amelia,
Edmond N., Charles Newton, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah.  Six years
before the outbreak of the Civil War, the family moved from Lexington,
Kentucky to the vicinity of St. Joseph, Missouri (along with their
slaves).
"St. Joseph was the eastern end of stagecoach lines, like Butterfield,
Wells Fargo, and American Express, that linked the eastern United
States with the West.  They carried freight and passengers."
Charles Newton Hockaday, the middle child of Edmond and Margaret was
born in 1837 at Old Homestaead in Lexington, Ky.  When the family
moved to Missouri, they left behind the three oldest children to
manage the homestead and they took with them Charles and his three
younger sisters, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah.  Charles (he was
nicknamed "Newt") had a cousin, Issac, John Hockadays' son, mentioned
earlier who founded a business hauling freight from St. Joseph to
"hell and gone" in the West.  Charles (Newton) worked for three years
as a teamster for Leavenworth & Pike's Peak Express, successor to the
Hockaday line.  Mostly he carried freight on the line between St. Joe
and Central city, Colorado.  He married Hannah Kelsay in 1864.  They
settled in the newly established Colorado Territory. There homestead
was southeast of Nederland.  Charles Newton became Deputy U.S.
Marshall in 1876, based in Boulder, Co.  He held this job for ten
years.  He died in 1910.
Newton and Hannah had four children, Edmond, Charles, Harriett, and
Ida.  Edmond Warwick was born May 17, 1867 at Balckhawk, Co. At age
nineteen he graduated from Denver University in business.  He married
Grace Elvira Haight in 1894.  And they had five kids.  My grandpa was
the second to the youngest - Robert Newton, born 1901.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
For an American you have a longish history there, longer than most
Americans. But not by our standards.
My family name can be traced back twice as long as that and I am not
unusual.
I see your ancestor were among those that stole land from the indians.
What happened to the indians?
I think that would be Haigh BTW. Also goes back a long time.
Originates in the North of England. There are Haighs in my family. We
may be related. Just remember me in your will :-)
joe
2010-12-29 18:01:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
On Dec 27, 10:21 am, Mike P
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on
geography and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport.
It's such >> > >> > a vast country that there's not the same
incentive to holiday >> > >> > abroad. Maybe that's why they are
rather inward-looking?
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in
geography and climate that no matter what you might want
from a >> > >> holiday - beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc.
You can get it >> > >> without leaving the US. In fact - you have
got all of that in >> > >> California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
Post by Mike P
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire
and never >> > travel more than 40 miles from where I was born.
My 80 year old aunt >> > has never been out of Lancashire..
Post by Mike P
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see
exactly >> > > nothing.
Post by Mike P
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours
that crossed >> > the pond with them.
Post by Mike P
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
 We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and
we have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese,
Samoans, etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
What culture is "American", other than the Native Americans?  NONE.
The rest of us are immigrants!
You have no culture of your own. You just import/steal everyone
elses. I've got plenty of relatives over there, and used to work
for a company based in Pittsburgh. I can trace my descendants
back to the deputy Sherrif of Wyoming in 1878, Robert
Widdowfield. My more immediate family have lived in the USA since
1949.
Good Lord!  Who do you think you are?
My family on my father's side started with William in 1610, England.
His son, William,  was given a patent (grant) by the King of
England, for himself and eleven servants into "The Colony".  He was
a merchant and a lawyer.  The date was August 11, 1642.  The
colony's administrator, Sir William Berkeley, granted William
Hockaday 500 acres of land "lyeing on the South side of Charles
River near the Narrows being in the County of yorke bounded by
Northwest by West upon Waraney Creeke northeast by East upon the
river Southeast by East toward the Ware Creek."  Two years later he
was granted 1346 acres near the narrows of the York River.  Shortly
thereafter he got land in Northumberland County.  He was one of the
largest landholders in Virginia.
He had a son, William Hockaday, Jr.  He was one of the Tidewater
aristocracy.  He died in the spring of 1670 in
New Kent, Virginia.  Now here is where there is a gap.  As far as my
Dad's book goes, he mentions that there is another William Hockaday
and he was a burgess in Virginia in 1748 and 1749. His great
grandfather was the above mentioned William Hockaday Jr.
Next we skip to Warwick Hockaday of Charles City County, married to
Mary.  Their children were James, Elizabeth Mary, Bristow and
Samuel. Now here's where we have yet another gap.  The book
mentions cousins, John, Philemon, and Edmond, and yet we don't know
who therir parents' are.  Edmond is the closest I come to having a
direct line from here on out.  In between all this was the
Revolutionary war and the signing of the Constitution!  Captain
John Hockaday and Phillip Hockaday were mentioned as fighting in
the war, but I don't know where they lie in the family tree as my
father does not have that information.
Okay, so Edmond Hockaday (born 1751 - Virginia) and his wife Martha
had a son named Edmond (born 1771 - Virginia).  Edmond married Eliza
Baker.  Shortly before the turn of the century, Edmond and his wife,
pulled up stakes and headed West over the Cumberland Gap to
Kentucky. According to the records, he was restless on the
plantation and wanted to see what was on the other side of the
mountians.  His brother, John Hockaday, also moved to Kentucky. It
mentions in the book that John had a son named Issac Newton
Hockaday who moved to Plattsburg, Missouri.
Edmond and Eliza Hockaday have a son named Edmond H. Hockaday (born
1804 in Lexington, Kentucky).  He married Margaret Taliafarro,
reputed to be of noble Italian descent. (This is the only Italian
blood in my family!) Their children were Alan, Amelia,
Edmond N., Charles Newton, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah.  Six years
before the outbreak of the Civil War, the family moved from
Lexington, Kentucky to the vicinity of St. Joseph, Missouri (along
with their slaves).
"St. Joseph was the eastern end of stagecoach lines, like
Butterfield, Wells Fargo, and American Express, that linked the
eastern United States with the West.  They carried freight and
passengers."
Charles Newton Hockaday, the middle child of Edmond and Margaret was
born in 1837 at Old Homestaead in Lexington, Ky.  When the family
moved to Missouri, they left behind the three oldest children to
manage the homestead and they took with them Charles and his three
younger sisters, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah.  Charles (he was
nicknamed "Newt") had a cousin, Issac, John Hockadays' son,
mentioned earlier who founded a business hauling freight from St.
Joseph to "hell and gone" in the West.  Charles (Newton) worked for
three years as a teamster for Leavenworth & Pike's Peak Express,
successor to the Hockaday line.  Mostly he carried freight on the
line between St. Joe and Central city, Colorado.  He married Hannah
Kelsay in 1864.  They settled in the newly established Colorado
Territory. There homestead was southeast of Nederland.  Charles
Newton became Deputy U.S. Marshall in 1876, based in Boulder, Co.
 He held this job for ten years.  He died in 1910.
Newton and Hannah had four children, Edmond, Charles, Harriett, and
Ida.  Edmond Warwick was born May 17, 1867 at Balckhawk, Co. At age
nineteen he graduated from Denver University in business.  He
married Grace Elvira Haight in 1894.  And they had five kids.  My
grandpa was the second to the youngest - Robert Newton, born 1901.-
Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
For an American you have a longish history there, longer than most
Americans. But not by our standards.
My family name can be traced back twice as long as that and I am not
unusual.
I think you are very unusual. I am back as far as 1600's and the
records are extremely rare. Most people who say they are further back,
have been taken in by bogus researchers. Not saying you are one of
these, but certainly unusual.

Where did you get the data for the 13th century?

--
Meta
2010-12-29 18:37:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by harry
For an American you have a longish history there, longer than most
Americans.  But not by our standards.
My family name can be traced back twice as long as that and I am not
unusual.
I think you are very unusual. I am back as far as 1600's and the
records are extremely rare. Most people who say they are further back,
have been taken in by bogus researchers. Not saying you are one of
these, but certainly unusual.
Where did you get the data for the 13th century?
My father spent alot of time contacting relatives and gathering all of
his information. My family was close-knit and kept records. I don't
have any data for the 13th century, that would have been 1201 to
1300. My father's family would have been in England in the 13th
century and my father was only able to trace our family history as far
back as William Hockaday 1600 b. England.
Post by joe
--- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
joe
2010-12-29 19:47:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Meta
Post by joe
Post by harry
For an American you have a longish history there, longer than most
Americans.  But not by our standards.
My family name can be traced back twice as long as that and I am
not unusual.
I think you are very unusual. I am back as far as 1600's and the
records are extremely rare. Most people who say they are further
back, have been taken in by bogus researchers. Not saying you are
one of these, but certainly unusual.
Where did you get the data for the 13th century?
My father spent alot of time contacting relatives and gathering all of
his information. My family was close-knit and kept records. I don't
have any data for the 13th century, that would have been 1201 to
1300. My father's family would have been in England in the 13th
century and my father was only able to trace our family history as far
back as William Hockaday 1600 b. England.
That's what I thought, you said twice as long. The pp said back to the
1600 (400 year), so I thought you meant back 800 years.
--
harry
2010-12-30 08:12:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by harry
On Dec 27, 10:21 am, Mike P
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on
geography and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport.
It's such >> > >> > a vast country that there's not the same
incentive to holiday >> > >> > abroad. Maybe that's why they are
rather inward-looking?
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in
geography and climate that no matter what you might want
from a >> > >> holiday - beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc.
You can get it >> > >> without leaving the US. In fact - you have
got all of that in >> > >> California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
Post by Mike P
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire
and never >> > travel more than 40 miles from where I was born.
My 80 year old aunt >> > has never been out of Lancashire..
Post by Mike P
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see
exactly >> > > nothing.
Post by Mike P
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours
that crossed >> > the pond with them.
Post by Mike P
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.
We have >> Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and
we have >> Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese,
Samoans, etc, >> etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures American? No. Of course they are not.
What culture is "American", other than the Native Americans? NONE.
The rest of us are immigrants!
You have no culture of your own. You just import/steal everyone
elses.  I've got plenty of relatives over there, and used to work
for a company based in Pittsburgh. I can trace my descendants
back to the deputy Sherrif of Wyoming in 1878, Robert
Widdowfield. My more immediate family have lived in the USA since
1949.
Good Lord! Who do you think you are?
My family on my father's side started with William in 1610, England.
His son, William, was given a patent (grant) by the King of
England, for himself and eleven servants into "The Colony". He was
a merchant and a lawyer. The date was August 11, 1642. The
colony's administrator, Sir William Berkeley, granted William
Hockaday 500 acres of land "lyeing on the South side of Charles
River near the Narrows being in the County of yorke bounded by
Northwest by West upon Waraney Creeke northeast by East upon the
river Southeast by East toward the Ware Creek." Two years later he
was granted 1346 acres near the narrows of the York River. Shortly
thereafter he got land in Northumberland County. He was one of the
largest landholders in Virginia.
He had a son, William Hockaday, Jr. He was one of the Tidewater
aristocracy. He died in the spring of 1670 in
New Kent, Virginia. Now here is where there is a gap. As far as my
Dad's book goes, he mentions that there is another William Hockaday
and he was a burgess in Virginia in 1748 and 1749. His great
grandfather was the above mentioned William Hockaday Jr.
Next we skip to Warwick Hockaday of Charles City County, married to
Mary. Their children were James, Elizabeth Mary, Bristow and
Samuel.  Now here's where we have yet another gap. The book
mentions cousins, John, Philemon, and Edmond, and yet we don't know
who therir parents' are. Edmond is the closest I come to having a
direct line from here on out. In between all this was the
Revolutionary war and the signing of the Constitution! Captain
John Hockaday and Phillip Hockaday were mentioned as fighting in
the war, but I don't know where they lie in the family tree as my
father does not have that information.
Okay, so Edmond Hockaday (born 1751 - Virginia) and his wife Martha
had a son named Edmond (born 1771 - Virginia). Edmond married Eliza
Baker. Shortly before the turn of the century, Edmond and his wife,
pulled up stakes and headed West over the Cumberland Gap to
Kentucky.  According to the records, he was restless on the
plantation and wanted to see what was on the other side of the
mountians. His brother, John Hockaday, also moved to Kentucky. It
mentions in the book that John had a son named Issac Newton
Hockaday who moved to Plattsburg, Missouri.
Edmond and Eliza Hockaday have a son named Edmond H. Hockaday (born
1804 in Lexington, Kentucky). He married Margaret Taliafarro,
reputed to be of noble Italian descent. (This is the only Italian
blood in my family!) Their children were Alan, Amelia,
Edmond N., Charles Newton, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah. Six years
before the outbreak of the Civil War, the family moved from
Lexington, Kentucky to the vicinity of St. Joseph, Missouri (along
with their slaves).
"St. Joseph was the eastern end of stagecoach lines, like
Butterfield, Wells Fargo, and American Express, that linked the
eastern United States with the West. They carried freight and
passengers."
Charles Newton Hockaday, the middle child of Edmond and Margaret was
born in 1837 at Old Homestaead in Lexington, Ky. When the family
moved to Missouri, they left behind the three oldest children to
manage the homestead and they took with them Charles and his three
younger sisters, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah. Charles (he was
nicknamed "Newt") had a cousin, Issac, John Hockadays' son,
mentioned earlier who founded a business hauling freight from St.
Joseph to "hell and gone" in the West. Charles (Newton) worked for
three years as a teamster for Leavenworth & Pike's Peak Express,
successor to the Hockaday line. Mostly he carried freight on the
line between St. Joe and Central city, Colorado. He married Hannah
Kelsay in 1864. They settled in the newly established Colorado
Territory. There homestead was southeast of Nederland. Charles
Newton became Deputy U.S.  Marshall in 1876, based in Boulder, Co.
He held this job for ten years. He died in 1910.
Newton and Hannah had four children, Edmond, Charles, Harriett, and
Ida. Edmond Warwick was born May 17, 1867 at Balckhawk, Co. At age
nineteen he graduated from Denver University in business. He
married Grace Elvira Haight in 1894. And they had five kids. My
grandpa was the second to the youngest - Robert Newton, born 1901.-
Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
For an American you have a longish history there, longer than most
Americans.  But not by our standards.
My family name can be traced back twice as long as that and I am not
unusual.
I think you are very unusual. I am back as far as 1600's and the
records are extremely rare. Most people who say they are further back,
have been taken in by bogus researchers. Not saying you are one of
these, but certainly unusual.
Where did you get the data for the 13th century?
--- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
All my family came from a small village in Northern England mentioned
in the Domesday book.. (A place name)
The place name still exists and I was born there as were all my
traceable ancestors.

Meta
2010-12-29 18:26:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Mike P
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on
geography and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such
a vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday
abroad. Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in
geography and climate that no matter what you might want from a
holiday - beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it
without leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in
California alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt
has never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed
the pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We have
Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.
Are any of those cultures *American*? No. Of course they are not.
What culture is "American", other than the Native Americans?  NONE.
The rest of us are immigrants!
Post by Mike P
You have no culture of your own. You just import/steal everyone elses.
I've got plenty of relatives over there, and used to work for a company
based in Pittsburgh. I can trace my descendants back to the deputy Sherrif
of Wyoming in 1878, Robert Widdowfield. My more immediate family have
lived in the USA since 1949.
Good Lord!  Who do you think you are?
My family on my father's side started with William in 1610, England.
His son, William,  was given a patent (grant) by the King of England,
for himself and eleven servants into "The Colony".  He was a merchant
and a lawyer.  The date was August 11, 1642.  The colony's
administrator, Sir William Berkeley, granted William Hockaday 500
acres of land "lyeing on the South side of Charles River near the
Narrows being in the County of yorke bounded by Northwest by West upon
Waraney Creeke northeast by East upon the river Southeast by East
toward the Ware Creek."  Two years later he was granted 1346 acres
near the narrows of the York River.  Shortly thereafter he got land in
Northumberland County.  He was one of the largest landholders in
Virginia.
He had a son, William Hockaday, Jr.  He was one of the Tidewater
aristocracy.  He died in the spring of 1670 in
New Kent, Virginia.  Now here is where there is a gap.  As far as my
Dad's book goes, he mentions that there is another William Hockaday
and he was a burgess in Virginia in 1748 and 1749. His great
grandfather was the above mentioned William Hockaday Jr.
Next we skip to Warwick Hockaday of Charles City County, married to
Mary.  Their children were James, Elizabeth Mary, Bristow and Samuel.
Now here's where we have yet another gap.  The book mentions cousins,
John, Philemon, and Edmond, and yet we don't know who therir parents'
are.  Edmond is the closest I come to having a direct line from here
on out.  In between all this was the Revolutionary war and the signing
of the Constitution!  Captain John Hockaday and Phillip Hockaday were
mentioned as fighting in the war, but I don't know where they lie in
the family tree as my father does not have that information.
Okay, so Edmond Hockaday (born 1751 - Virginia) and his wife Martha
had a son named Edmond (born 1771 - Virginia).  Edmond married Eliza
Baker.  Shortly before the turn of the century, Edmond and his wife,
pulled up stakes and headed West over the Cumberland Gap to Kentucky.
According to the records, he was restless on the plantation and wanted
to see what was on the other side of the mountians.  His brother, John
Hockaday, also moved to Kentucky. It mentions in the book that John
had a son named Issac Newton Hockaday who moved to Plattsburg,
Missouri.
Edmond and Eliza Hockaday have a son named Edmond H. Hockaday (born
1804 in Lexington, Kentucky).  He married Margaret Taliafarro, reputed
to be of noble Italian descent. (This is the only Italian blood in my
family!) Their children were Alan, Amelia,
Edmond N., Charles Newton, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah.  Six years
before the outbreak of the Civil War, the family moved from Lexington,
Kentucky to the vicinity of St. Joseph, Missouri (along with their
slaves).
"St. Joseph was the eastern end of stagecoach lines, like Butterfield,
Wells Fargo, and American Express, that linked the eastern United
States with the West.  They carried freight and passengers."
Charles Newton Hockaday, the middle child of Edmond and Margaret was
born in 1837 at Old Homestaead in Lexington, Ky.  When the family
moved to Missouri, they left behind the three oldest children to
manage the homestead and they took with them Charles and his three
younger sisters, Mary, Margaret, and Hannah.  Charles (he was
nicknamed "Newt") had a cousin, Issac, John Hockadays' son, mentioned
earlier who founded a business hauling freight from St. Joseph to
"hell and gone" in the West.  Charles (Newton) worked for three years
as a teamster for Leavenworth & Pike's Peak Express, successor to the
Hockaday line.  Mostly he carried freight on the line between St. Joe
and Central city, Colorado.  He married Hannah Kelsay in 1864.  They
settled in the newly established Colorado Territory. There homestead
was southeast of Nederland.  Charles Newton became Deputy U.S.
Marshall in 1876, based in Boulder, Co.  He held this job for ten
years.  He died in 1910.
Newton and Hannah had four children, Edmond, Charles, Harriett, and
Ida.  Edmond Warwick was born May 17, 1867 at Balckhawk, Co. At age
nineteen he graduated from Denver University in business.  He married
Grace Elvira Haight in 1894.  And they had five kids.  My grandpa was
the second to the youngest - Robert Newton, born 1901.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
For an American you have a longish history there, longer than most
Americans.  But not by our standards.
My family name can be traced back twice as long as that and I am not
unusual.
I see your ancestor were among those that stole land from the indians.
What happened to the indians?
I think that would be Haigh BTW. Also goes back a long time.
Originates in the North of England. There are Haighs in  my family. We
may be related. Just remember me in your will  :-)- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Yes, my ancestors stole the Indians land, under orders from the King
of England :) What do you think happened to the Indians? My
ancestors probably killed them if they needed to, in order to defend
"their" land (under orders of the King of England). Didn't you ever
watch any westerns???

And you are wrong about my great grandmother, it's Haight, she was of
Scottish descent.
Meta
2010-12-28 23:24:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US.
In fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt has
never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed the
pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We
have Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.  You are dead wrong about
the U.S.A. not having culture.  Obviously, you don't know much about
the U.S.  Amazing!
I traveled to North Yorkshire just this summer and loved it.  My
father began taking me around the world since I was eight years old.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Hawaii was stolen from it's inhabitants. They want it back. The only
culture there is their's.
The Yanks keep the Hawain royal family locked up.- Hide quoted text -
Yes, you are right, Hawaii was stolen from the Hawaiian people, just
as America was stolen from the Native Americans. Yes, the Hawaiians
want their land back, just as the Native Americans do. However, you
are wrong about Hawaii only having one culture. You, obviously, don't
know a thing about Hawaii. And, to address your third point, there is
no more Hawaiian royal family, that ended with Queen Lilioukalani.

Incidentally, Oahu, Hawaii's 3rd largest island and most populous is
1,545.4 Sq. km. U.S. millitary installations on Oahu cover at least
83 Sq. km.

Here's some links for you in the off chance that you might be
interested:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liliuokalani

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oahu

http://www.diamondheadhike.org/militaryhistory.html
harry
2010-12-29 16:09:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Meta
Post by harry
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US.
In fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt has
never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed the
pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We
have Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.  You are dead wrong about
the U.S.A. not having culture.  Obviously, you don't know much about
the U.S.  Amazing!
I traveled to North Yorkshire just this summer and loved it.  My
father began taking me around the world since I was eight years old.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Hawaii was stolen from it's inhabitants. They want it back. The only
culture there is their's.
The Yanks keep the Hawain royal family locked up.- Hide quoted text -
Yes, you are right, Hawaii was stolen from the Hawaiian people, just
as America was stolen from the Native Americans.  Yes, the Hawaiians
want their land back, just as the Native Americans do.  However, you
are wrong about Hawaii only having one culture.  You, obviously, don't
know a thing about Hawaii.  And, to address your third point, there is
no more Hawaiian royal family, that ended with Queen Lilioukalani.
Incidentally, Oahu, Hawaii's 3rd largest island and most populous is
1,545.4 Sq. km.   U.S. millitary installations on Oahu cover at least
83 Sq. km.
Here's some links for you in the off chance that you might be
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liliuokalani
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oahu
http://www.diamondheadhike.org/militaryhistory.html- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Here's one you haven't mentioned too.
http://www.freehawaii.org/
How Hawaii was stolen from the Hawaiins.
The present king was in jail until quite recently.
Anthony R. Gold
2010-12-29 17:35:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
The present king was in jail until quite recently.
Not only quite recently but also quite frequently. James Kimo Akahi, the
self-styled "King Akahi Nui", is a life long criminal with 21 convictions
dating back to 1961 that include burglary and escape. He has never produced
any documentation to his more recent claim to being a descendant of both King
Kamehameha I and of Queen Liliuokalani's sister. He also claims that his
crown is recognised by the United Nations. His most recent conviction was for
burglary while breaking into the Iolani Palace. He claimed to have intended
to chain himself to the throne but failed when couldn't find the throne room.
Meta
2010-12-29 18:18:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Meta
Post by harry
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US.
In fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a
Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
I can get big hills, beaches, lakes, forests in Lancashire and never
travel more than 40 miles from where I was born. My 80 year old aunt has
never *been* out of Lancashire..
That seems rather dull to me.
Post by harry
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
Yes, spot on. Most of their culture and heritage is ours that crossed the
pond with them.
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I live in Hawaii, the 50th state, and we have LOTS of culture.  We
have Chinatown, as most large cities in the U.S. have, and we have
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Hawaiians, Vietnamese, Samoans, etc,
etc....and we are all living in the U.S.A.  You are dead wrong about
the U.S.A. not having culture.  Obviously, you don't know much about
the U.S.  Amazing!
I traveled to North Yorkshire just this summer and loved it.  My
father began taking me around the world since I was eight years old.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Hawaii was stolen from it's inhabitants. They want it back. The only
culture there is their's.
The Yanks keep the Hawain royal family locked up.- Hide quoted text -
Yes, you are right, Hawaii was stolen from the Hawaiian people, just
as America was stolen from the Native Americans.  Yes, the Hawaiians
want their land back, just as the Native Americans do.  However, you
are wrong about Hawaii only having one culture.  You, obviously, don't
know a thing about Hawaii.  And, to address your third point, there is
no more Hawaiian royal family, that ended with Queen Lilioukalani.
Incidentally, Oahu, Hawaii's 3rd largest island and most populous is
1,545.4 Sq. km.   U.S. millitary installations on Oahu cover at least
83 Sq. km.
Here's some links for you in the off chance that you might be
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liliuokalani
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oahu
http://www.diamondheadhike.org/militaryhistory.html-Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Here's one you haven't mentioned too.http://www.freehawaii.org/
How Hawaii was stolen from the Hawaiins.
The present king was in jail until quite recently.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I'm not interested in "freeing" Hawaii. That's all bullshit, it'll
never happen.
Ret.
2010-12-27 20:39:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography
and climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday -
beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without
leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in California
alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
I suppose it depends upon where you travel...

In California you can drive from the desert area of Palm Springs in the
South to the magnificent beauty of Yosemite National Park east of San
Francisco. SF itself is a fantastic city with the cable cars to enjoy and a
boat-trip out to Alcatraz for a bit of a change. Terrific sea food
restaurants. You've never tasted real clam chowder until you've had it in a
bread bowl in a waterfront restaurant in SF.
Then you've got the sheer beauty of Lake Tahoe on the California/Nevada
border and you can drive up into the Rockies for rugged mountain scenery.
Then you've got the massive redwoods up near to Eureka on the North West
coast of CA.

We've been to California three times now and never tire of what it has to
offer. And the additional bonus is that petrol is cheap and your money goes
a long way out there...
--
Kev
GB
2010-12-27 21:06:47 UTC
Permalink
We love new york - great city, expect possibly now wth the blizzard.
totallyconfused
2010-12-27 21:14:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography
and climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday -
beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without
leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in California
alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
I suppose it depends upon where you travel...
In California you can drive from the desert area of Palm Springs in the
South to the magnificent beauty of Yosemite National Park east of San
Francisco. SF itself is a fantastic city with the cable cars to enjoy and a
boat-trip out to Alcatraz for a bit of a change. Terrific sea food
restaurants. You've never tasted real clam chowder until you've had it in a
bread bowl in a waterfront restaurant in SF.
Then you've got the sheer beauty of Lake Tahoe on the California/Nevada
border and you can drive up into the Rockies for rugged mountain scenery.
Then you've got the massive redwoods up near to Eureka on the North West
coast of CA.
We've been to California three times now and never tire of what it has to
offer. And the additional bonus is that petrol is cheap and your money goes
a long way out there...
--
Kev- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Excuse me but the best place for chowder is either Boston or at
Phillips in Baltimore Maryland in Habour Place.....
BartC
2010-12-27 21:40:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography
and climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday -
beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without
leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in California
alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
I suppose it depends upon where you travel...
In California you can drive from the desert area of Palm Springs in the
South to the magnificent beauty of Yosemite National Park east of San
Francisco. SF itself is a fantastic city with the cable cars to enjoy and
a boat-trip out to Alcatraz for a bit of a change. Terrific sea food
restaurants. You've never tasted real clam chowder until you've had it in
a bread bowl in a waterfront restaurant in SF.
Then you've got the sheer beauty of Lake Tahoe on the California/Nevada
border and you can drive up into the Rockies for rugged mountain scenery.
Then you've got the massive redwoods up near to Eureka on the North West
coast of CA.
There's not much in the way of history: medieval hill-top towns, castles,
old churches and stuff like that. Even the quaint villages we have in the UK
that you never really notice until you come back from abroad.

A lot of the US seems just an endless sprawl of shopping malls, gas stations
and motels. And out of town there's sometimes just nothing. I remember
driving 50 miles along Lake Mead: lake on one side, desert on the other, and
absolutely nothing else: just a strip of road; not even any other cars! And
the lake itself is only 70 years old.

Now imagine a similar drive around Lake Garda, say, which would be as full
of life as Lake Mead is devoid of it (although unfortunately mostly full of
Germans..)
--
Bartc
Ret.
2010-12-27 22:35:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by BartC
Post by Ret.
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday
abroad. Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography
and climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday -
beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without
leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in California
alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
I suppose it depends upon where you travel...
In California you can drive from the desert area of Palm Springs in
the South to the magnificent beauty of Yosemite National Park east
of San Francisco. SF itself is a fantastic city with the cable cars
to enjoy and a boat-trip out to Alcatraz for a bit of a change.
Terrific sea food restaurants. You've never tasted real clam chowder
until you've had it in a bread bowl in a waterfront restaurant in SF.
Then you've got the sheer beauty of Lake Tahoe on the
California/Nevada border and you can drive up into the Rockies for
rugged mountain scenery. Then you've got the massive redwoods up
near to Eureka on the North West coast of CA.
There's not much in the way of history: medieval hill-top towns,
castles, old churches and stuff like that. Even the quaint villages
we have in the UK that you never really notice until you come back
from abroad.
Well, there's not much in the way of mediaeval history because America is a
'young' country. Having said that, when we did a 'Deep South' tour there was
plenty to see: Civil war sites and museums, Civil Rights museums. We toured
a cotton plantation where the old slave cabins had been preserved. And, of
course - there was Graceland and the Grand Ole Opre!
Post by BartC
A lot of the US seems just an endless sprawl of shopping malls, gas
stations and motels. And out of town there's sometimes just nothing.
I remember driving 50 miles along Lake Mead: lake on one side, desert
on the other, and absolutely nothing else: just a strip of road; not
even any other cars! And the lake itself is only 70 years old.
You could make exactly the same argument for a drive around many Scottish
Lochs!
Post by BartC
Now imagine a similar drive around Lake Garda, say, which would be as
full of life as Lake Mead is devoid of it (although unfortunately
mostly full of Germans..)
Most countries have their attractions and downsides...
--
Kev
BartC
2010-12-28 00:01:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by BartC
There's not much in the way of history: medieval hill-top towns,
castles, old churches and stuff like that. Even the quaint villages
we have in the UK that you never really notice until you come back
from abroad.
Well, there's not much in the way of mediaeval history because America is
a 'young' country.
Well, it's 500 years old; more if you count the indians. St Peters in Rome
hadn't even been started when America was discovered.
Post by Ret.
Civil war sites and museums, Civil Rights museums. We toured a cotton
plantation where the old slave cabins had been preserved. And, of course -
there was Graceland and the Grand Ole Opre!
It's all great fun actually, especially when it matches everything you've
seen on TV and at the movies (well, apart from getting shot).

Bit strange though wandering around a ghost town, looking at wooden houses
last inhabited around 1940, and you're living in a house 50 years older back
in the UK..
--
Bartc
%steve%@malloc.co.uk (Steve Firth)
2010-12-28 00:33:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
We've been to California three times now and never tire of what it has to
offer.
What it has to offer is ... nothing much. There's more culture in
Zimbabwe than there is in California.
Post by Ret.
And the additional bonus is that petrol is cheap and your money goes
a long way out there...
Yeah, if you're only requirements are cheap petrol and cheap (vile) food
then California is great. Still, it must be hell on earth for you having
to mix it with all those liberals.
harry
2010-12-28 08:33:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a
vast country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad.
Maybe that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography
and climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday -
beaches, mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without
leaving the US. In fact - you have got all of that in California
alone - with a Mediterranean climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
But there is no culture. And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
I suppose it depends upon where you travel...
In California you can drive from the desert area of Palm Springs in the
South to the magnificent beauty of Yosemite National Park east of San
Francisco. SF itself is a fantastic city with the cable cars to enjoy and a
boat-trip out to Alcatraz for a bit of a change. Terrific sea food
restaurants. You've never tasted real clam chowder until you've had it in a
bread bowl in a waterfront restaurant in SF.
Then you've got the sheer beauty of Lake Tahoe on the California/Nevada
border and you can drive up into the Rockies for rugged mountain scenery.
Then you've got the massive redwoods up near to Eureka on the North West
coast of CA.
We've been to California three times now and never tire of what it has to
offer. And the additional bonus is that petrol is cheap and your money goes
a long way out there...
--
Kev- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
You need to travel to South America.
Alex Heney
2010-12-27 22:27:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a vast
country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad. Maybe
that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US. In
fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a Mediterranean
climate as a bonus.
--
Kev
But there is no culture.
Of course there is culture.

You don't get the *c#variety* of culture that you would by going to
different countries, and you don't have the same deep seated
*historical* culture you have in many places.

But there is certainly culture.
Post by harry
And you can travel miles and see exactly
nothing.
In some parts, certainly you can.

In others there is plenty to see.

Not that the USA is ever likely to be high on my list of priority
places to go for a holiday. But that is my personal taste, not because
I believe they have no culture, and nothing to see.
--
Alex Heney, Global Villager
Some people approach every problem with an open mouth
To reply by email, my address is alexATheneyDOTplusDOTcom
Anthony R. Gold
2010-12-28 03:25:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alex Heney
I believe they have no culture, and nothing to see.
That's so true, although it remains a puzzle why no other country has won
more Nobel prizes for literature. I guess we should put that down to bribing
the Swedish judges. And, although being totally hopeless at geography, they
still managed to find Europe in the 1940s and later bumbled around enough to
stumble on the moon - but still certainly more by luck than by judgment.

I sit here in Key West, watching the palm trees in my garden sway over the
pool, and give thanks that the views published in this thread might tend to
keep down the number of people who would visit this totally wretched place.

Tony
Anthony R. Gold
2010-12-28 03:37:36 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 22:25:13 -0500, "Anthony R. Gold"
Post by Anthony R. Gold
That's so true, although it remains a puzzle why no other country has won
more Nobel prizes for literature. I guess we should put that down to bribing
the Swedish judges.
No true - I now see that the French did even more bribing than the USA :-(

Tony
harry
2010-12-28 08:39:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anthony R. Gold
Post by Alex Heney
I believe they have no culture, and nothing to see.
That's so true, although it remains a puzzle why no other country has won
more Nobel prizes for literature. I guess we should put that down to bribing
the Swedish judges. And, although being totally hopeless at geography, they
still managed to find Europe in the 1940s and later bumbled around enough to
stumble on the moon - but still certainly more by luck than by judgment.
I sit here in Key West, watching the palm trees in my garden sway over the
pool, and give thanks that the views published in this thread might tend to
keep down the number of people who would visit this totally wretched place.
Tony
Their German war criminal put them on the moon.
BartC
2010-12-28 11:50:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anthony R. Gold
Post by Alex Heney
I believe they have no culture, and nothing to see.
That's so true, although it remains a puzzle why no other country has won
more Nobel prizes for literature. I guess we should put that down to bribing
the Swedish judges. And, although being totally hopeless at geography, they
still managed to find Europe in the 1940s
Eventually..
Post by Anthony R. Gold
and later bumbled around enough to
stumble on the moon - but still certainly more by luck than by judgment.
If you read the Apollo accounts, that might be more true than you think...
Post by Anthony R. Gold
I sit here in Key West, watching the palm trees in my garden sway over the
pool, and give thanks that the views published in this thread might tend to
keep down the number of people who would visit this totally wretched place.
I have briefly thought about buying place in the Caribbean. But, apart from
a perfect climate, wonderful beaches and all the rest, there really is
nothing much there, compared with the richness of life in the UK. I'm sure I
would go crazy with boredom after about a month. (And that's ignoring
problems with the legality of buying property, the heat, mosquitoes,
hurricanes and such.)
--
Bartc
Alex Heney
2010-12-28 23:16:08 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 27 Dec 2010 22:25:13 -0500, "Anthony R. Gold"
Post by Alex Heney
I believe they have no culture, and nothing to see.
No I didn't.

Please get your attributions right.
--
Alex Heney, Global Villager
By all means, let's not confuse ourselves with the facts!
To reply by email, my address is alexATheneyDOTplusDOTcom
Alex Heney
2010-12-27 22:20:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
Post by GB
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
Only a small proportion of Americans have a passport. It's such a vast
country that there's not the same incentive to holiday abroad. Maybe
that's why they are rather inward-looking?
That's very true. America has such a massive variation in geography and
climate that no matter what you might want from a holiday - beaches,
mountain, lakes, forests, etc. You can get it without leaving the US. In
fact - you have got all of that in California alone - with a Mediterranean
climate as a bonus.
In terms of scenery and physical conditions, true.

But many people go on holiday to foreign places as much for the
culture as for the scenery and climate.

And those you cannot get anything you want while staying in the US.
--
Alex Heney, Global Villager
FOR SALE: Iraqi rifle. Never fired. Dropped once.
To reply by email, my address is alexATheneyDOTplusDOTcom
Meta
2010-12-27 18:52:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and world
affairs ....
--
Regards,
Periander
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million. As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
Periander
2010-12-27 19:11:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Meta
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million. As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
Best answer yet (and truth be told) one I wholehartedly agree with. Still
it is a funny video.
--
Regards,


Periander
Meta
2010-12-28 07:53:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Periander
Post by Meta
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million.  As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
Best answer yet (and truth be told) one I wholehartedly agree with. Still
it is a funny video.
--
Regards,
Periander
Thanks! :)
harry
2010-12-27 20:23:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Meta
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and world
affairs ....
--
Regards,
Periander
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million.  As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
It's probably not even random. They picked out the stupid ones. Not
everyone could be that thick, even in America.
Though come to think I did meet a lot of dopes in America, so
maybe.............
Mike P
2010-12-27 20:37:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Meta
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
--
Regards,
Periander
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million.  As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
It's probably not even random. They picked out the stupid ones. Not
everyone could be that thick, even in America. Though come to think I
did meet a lot of dopes in America, so maybe.............
IME it varies greatly depnding on the area. I met plenty of people in SF,
Pittsburgh, NYC and LA that were pretty "normal" - reasonably intelligent,
knew a bit about the world who could hold a good conversation even when
pissed as a fart.

Then I went to Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi.

Especiall in Alabama, the sign on the state line should read "Welcome to
Alabama, please set your clocks back 500 years"..
--
Mike P
totallyconfused
2010-12-27 21:10:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Meta
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and
world affairs ....
--
Regards,
Periander
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million.  As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
It's probably not even random. They picked out the stupid ones. Not
everyone could be that thick, even in America. Though come to think I
did meet a lot of dopes in America, so maybe.............
IME it varies greatly depnding on the area. I met plenty of people in SF,
Pittsburgh, NYC and LA that were pretty "normal" - reasonably intelligent,
knew a bit about the world who could hold a good conversation even when
pissed as a fart.
Then I went to Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi.
Especiall in Alabama, the sign on the state line should read "Welcome to
Alabama, please set your clocks back 500 years"..
--
Mike P- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Being from the Northeast, I can confirm we do believe this of our
compatriots:
*Below South Carolina assume that they are inbred and believe NASCAR
to be a state sanctioned religion.
*We must 'tolerate ' them as the less intelligent members of the
family (poor things were all dropped on their heads as babies)'
*Anyone who claims 'Dixie will rise again' clearly just isn't all
there and must be assumed to have a dillusional disorder (again
inbred)
* His/her ability to string together a grammatically correct sentence
is a result of working their way out of the south and actually getting
an 8th grade education.
*If anyone south of the Mason-Dixon line can actually show you
anything on a map- he/she is a genius.
*Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi- assume is a racist pig and member of
the KKK (if white)

As for the Midwest, well the sumamary is 'they are either 20 years
behind or 20 years ahead of time- no one is sure....'

Don't get me started on Texans.....

Like most countries, we too have our lines of 'superiority'- We all
know that those of us from the REAL states (north of Mason Dixon) are
the REAL Americans. Interestingly the opposite of the UK- in the UK
the South is considered more educated, mannered and cultured. In the
USA it is the North.
Periander
2010-12-27 22:05:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by totallyconfused
the REAL Americans. Interestingly the opposite of the UK- in the UK
the South is considered more educated, mannered and cultured.
Only by southerners, we from the North tend to look on them as you look on
those from Alabama.
--
Regards,


Periander
Ret.
2010-12-27 22:40:35 UTC
Permalink
news:bba8de06-411e-4ae7-
Post by totallyconfused
the REAL Americans. Interestingly the opposite of the UK- in the UK
the South is considered more educated, mannered and cultured.
Only by southerners, we from the North tend to look on them as you
look on those from Alabama.
LOL!
--
Kev
Ret.
2010-12-27 22:29:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P
Post by harry
Post by Meta
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
--
Regards,
Periander
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million. As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
It's probably not even random. They picked out the stupid ones. Not
everyone could be that thick, even in America. Though come to think I
did meet a lot of dopes in America, so maybe.............
IME it varies greatly depnding on the area. I met plenty of people in
SF, Pittsburgh, NYC and LA that were pretty "normal" - reasonably
intelligent, knew a bit about the world who could hold a good
conversation even when pissed as a fart.
Then I went to Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi.
Especiall in Alabama, the sign on the state line should read "Welcome
to Alabama, please set your clocks back 500 years"..
Indeed - and it is no coincidence that that area is the bible belt is it?
Backward in so many ways...
--
Kev
Meta
2010-12-28 08:05:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Meta
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and world
affairs ....
--
Regards,
Periander
This is a random sampling of a handful of U.S. citizens out of 308
million.  As amusing as the video is, you cannot stereotype Americans
just as you can't stereotype Brits.
It's probably not even random. They picked out the stupid ones. Not
everyone could be that thick, even in America.
Though come to think I did meet a lot of dopes in America, so
maybe.............- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
You're very narrow minded and judgemental. I hope you don't work in
the field of law!
R. Mark Clayton
2010-12-27 19:49:08 UTC
Permalink
Perhaps that's because citizens of from California to Maine, can visit 49
other states (and IIRC all of Canada) without ever needing a passport.

Just TRY travelling in Europe without one, indeed just try travelling from
GB to the island of Ireland and back without one and see how you get on*...

OTOH one only has to recall President Reagan's (or Governor Palin for that
matter) grasp of geography to realise that this is a top down problem.
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography and world
affairs ....
--
Regards,
Periander
* with ££££ civil penalties for carriers who bring insufficiently documented
passengers probably not very well...
Steve Walker
2010-12-27 20:24:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
harry
2010-12-27 20:30:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing. If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
Meta
2010-12-28 08:06:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing.   If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
And who would these people be?
harry
2010-12-28 08:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing.   If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
And who would these people be?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could. There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).
Anthony R. Gold
2010-12-28 15:26:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by harry
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing.   If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
And who would these people be?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
People on the bus I was travelling on.
You discovered that the true intellectuals are to found riding on Greyhound
buses? Maybe try that same trick on the Clapham Omnibus and challenge your
fellow travelers to identify Rutland, Clwyd and Borders.

Tony
harry
2010-12-29 15:58:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anthony R. Gold
Post by harry
Post by harry
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing. If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
And who would these people be?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
People on the bus I was travelling on.
You discovered that the true intellectuals are to found riding on Greyhound
buses? Maybe try that same trick on the Clapham Omnibus and challenge your
fellow travelers to identify Rutland, Clwyd and Borders.
Tony- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Ah they are COCKNEYS. Near to sub-human.
BTW the Greyhound bus network has been partly sold off.
Francis Burton
2010-12-28 17:38:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Meta
And who would these people be?
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could. There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).
I learned the relative location and shape of all the States,
plus abbreviations, capitals and largest cities, just for the
hell of it (I'm a Brit living in Scotland). I believe some
American children are encouraged to do the same as a "fun
educational game for kids". I know one American adult who did
this.

Francis
Norman Wells
2010-12-28 17:41:26 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by harry
Post by Meta
And who would these people be?
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could. There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).
I learned the relative location and shape of all the States,
plus abbreviations, capitals and largest cities, just for the
hell of it (I'm a Brit living in Scotland). I believe some
American children are encouraged to do the same as a "fun
educational game for kids". I know one American adult who did
this.
Sounds absolutely riveting.
Ret.
2010-12-28 19:01:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
In article
Post by harry
Post by Meta
And who would these people be?
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could. There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).
I learned the relative location and shape of all the States,
plus abbreviations, capitals and largest cities, just for the
hell of it (I'm a Brit living in Scotland). I believe some
American children are encouraged to do the same as a "fun
educational game for kids". I know one American adult who did
this.
Sounds absolutely riveting.
My goodness Norman - you're in a bolshie mood today. Didn't you get the
Christmas present you were expecting?
--
Kev
Muhammad AdHominem
2010-12-28 19:41:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ret.
My goodness Norman - you're in a bolshie mood today. Didn't you get the
Christmas present you were expecting?
That would be the ad hominem that you never do, would it ex-Inspector
"BigFibber" Lunn?
joe
2010-12-28 19:55:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Muhammad AdHominem
Post by Ret.
My goodness Norman - you're in a bolshie mood today. Didn't you get
the Christmas present you were expecting?
That would be the ad hominem that you never do, would it ex-Inspector
"BigFibber" Lunn?
You call that an insult? You want to get out more.

--
Ret.
2010-12-28 20:03:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by Muhammad AdHominem
Post by Ret.
My goodness Norman - you're in a bolshie mood today. Didn't you get
the Christmas present you were expecting?
That would be the ad hominem that you never do, would it ex-Inspector
"BigFibber" Lunn?
You call that an insult? You want to get out more.
LOL! He's getting through pseudonyms that fast he'll be struggling to think
of a new one soon! Sad, sad man. Let no-one say that Stevie baby doesn't
hold a grudge!
--
Kev
BartC
2010-12-28 14:07:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could. There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).
If I was shown a world map with the countries outlined, but not named, then
I would have trouble with quite a few as well. Many African states, for
example.
--
Bartc
harry
2010-12-29 16:00:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by BartC
Post by harry
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could.  There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).
If I was shown a world map with the countries outlined, but not named, then
I would have trouble with quite a few as well. Many African states, for
example.
--
Bartc
Tch. You need to get out more. I was a foriegner, they were in their
home country.
BartC
2010-12-29 23:18:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by BartC
Post by harry
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could. There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).
If I was shown a world map with the countries outlined, but not named, then
I would have trouble with quite a few as well. Many African states, for
example.
Tch. You need to get out more. I was a foriegner, they were in their
home country.
What you're saying wouldn't be that far-fetched, if it was the other way
around.

Given instead, then, an outline map of the counties in the UK, I could
probably get most of those in England.

But if an American went to the trouble of coming all the way over here, and
had done his homework, I wouldn't be that surprised he could name a few
counties in Wales, Scotland and NI too.
--
Bartc
Meta
2010-12-28 23:27:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by harry
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing.   If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
And who would these people be?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could.  There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
What state were you traveling in?
harry
2010-12-29 16:21:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by harry
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing.   If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
And who would these people be?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could.  There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
What state were you traveling in?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Mid West. Not the most interesting part but I had read up & it turned
out better than expected. Due largely to the inhabitants and having a
local contact.

I spent half a day "volunteering " in a vets hospital in Des Moines.
(where my e-frind lived) They were so incredibly pleased and amazed to
see me pushing wheelchairs around. It was being like Jesus. They
loved my accent too. Heh Heh.
They have no culture.
We gave them Shakespear and Keats and Chaucer etc.
They gave us NCIS. 'Nuff said.
But though they are insular, poorly educated and unsophisticated, I
never had a better welcome anywhere. Just good people.
There is nothing to do.
The women spend their time shopping. The men sit in their basements-
converted-to-theme-bars and drink beer and playwith/talk about their
guns.
They all have a vast array of guns in the basement. They all feel the
need to accumulate more.

That's it. Gun culture. And fear culture.

They do have culture.
Meta
2010-12-29 18:17:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by harry
Post by harry
Post by Steve Walker
Post by Periander
Probably a re-post ...
http://youtu.be/fJuNgBkloFE
Video of Americans being asked very simple questions on geography
and world affairs ....
I loved the world map!
You can ask them simple questions about their own history (which is
very short) and they know nothing.   If you show thm a blank map od
their own country, many cannot put their finger on a single state.
Some can't even pick out Florida.
And who would these people be?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
People on the bus I was travelling on. I bet that I could name an
locate more American states than they could.  There were many could
not point to the UK on a map. (Though they claimed Brit descent).- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
What state were you traveling in?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Mid West. Not the most interesting part but I had read up & it turned
out better than expected. Due largely to the inhabitants and having a
local contact.
I spent half a day "volunteering " in a vets hospital in Des Moines.
(where my e-frind lived) They were so incredibly pleased and amazed to
see me pushing wheelchairs around.  It was being like Jesus.  They
loved  my accent too.  Heh Heh.
They have no culture.
We gave them Shakespear and Keats and Chaucer etc.
They gave us NCIS.   'Nuff said.
But though they are insular, poorly educated and unsophisticated, I
never had a better welcome anywhere.  Just good people.
There is nothing to do.
The women spend their time shopping. The men sit in their basements-
converted-to-theme-bars and drink beer and playwith/talk about their
guns.
They all have a vast array of guns in the basement.  They all feel the
need to accumulate more.
That's it. Gun culture. And fear culture.
They do have culture.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Whatever. I have no interest in ever living in the midwest, much less
stepping foot in it. I don't own a gun and never plan to.
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