Discussion:
Laughable Canuck boycott of U.S. goods
(too old to reply)
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 15:33:05 UTC
Permalink
"Byker" <***@do~rag.net> wrote in message news:4qCdncJb8pcFlPbGnZ2dnUU7-***@supernews.com...
: "Nearly 20% of American exports go to Canada. And they like it that way."
: --------------------------------------------------------------------
: Canadians Declare A Boycott On American Products To Punish Donald Trump.
: There's One BIG Problem.
:
: By EMILY ZANOTTI
: August 6, 2018
:
: Canadian consumers are launching a "boycott" of American goods, The Wall
: Street Journal reports, in retaliation for Trump Administration tariffs
and
: President Donald Trump's penchant for poking fun at their beloved Prime
: Minister.
:
: But there's one big problem: many of the consumer products Canadians
believe
: are made in Canada are actually made in the United States, or by American
: corporations.
:
: The "boycott" officially began in July, in response to the Trump
: Administration's new 20% tariff on Canadian steel (and a host of other,
less
: significant tariffs on things like Canadian aluminum), and after President
: Donald Trump called Prime Minister Justin Trudeau "weak" at a meeting of
the
: "group of 7." Angry at being disrespected, Canadians pledged to purge
their
: shopping carts of anything made below their southern border.
:
: "Usually we don't pay that much attention to it," one Canadian consumer
told
: the WJS. "You tend to buy the products that taste good or you buy the
: products that are low in price where taste isn't an issue." But, he added,
: this summer it got personal.
:
: Most products assumed to be Canadian, though, are actually American. Old
: Dutch chips, for example, are mostly consumed in Canada, but are made in
: Minnesota. And, it turns out, Americans make a lot of products that people
: use every day. Canadians might be able to do without Heinz ketchup, but
they
: probably won't give up drinking Starbucks or Coca-Cola, using Apple and
: Microsoft technology, eating at McDonalds or wearing American-made
clothing.
: If they do, they'll hurt local Canadian franchise owners before they harm
: American business interests.
:
: And where brands are "uniquely Canadian," chances are they're subsidiaries
: of global conglomerates headquartered in the United States. Unilever,
Kraft,
: and Proctor & Gamble make most toiletries, packaged food products, and
: household goods sold in the U.S. and Canada.
:
: Nearly 20% of American exports go to Canada. And they like it that way.
:
: There's also another facet: some products that Canadians assume are
: American, like Haagen Dazs, are actually Canadian.
:
: The "close, personal" relationship is probably one reason that Donald
Trump
: believes levying tariffs on Canadian goods will help equalize trade: if
you
: can't go without American products, you're more likely to find your way to
: the bargaining table to keep those goods flowing.
:
: https://tinyurl.com/y77efss8
:
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-09 11:24:22 UTC
Permalink
"BurfordTJustice" <burford/***@uk.MI15> wrote in message news:pkf2ft$i5e$***@dont-email.me...
:
: "Byker" <***@do~rag.net> wrote in message
: news:4qCdncJb8pcFlPbGnZ2dnUU7-***@supernews.com...
:: "Nearly 20% of American exports go to Canada. And they like it that way."
:: --------------------------------------------------------------------
:: Canadians Declare A Boycott On American Products To Punish Donald Trump.
:: There's One BIG Problem.
::
:: By EMILY ZANOTTI
:: August 6, 2018
::
:: Canadian consumers are launching a "boycott" of American goods, The Wall
:: Street Journal reports, in retaliation for Trump Administration tariffs
: and
:: President Donald Trump's penchant for poking fun at their beloved Prime
:: Minister.
::
:: But there's one big problem: many of the consumer products Canadians
: believe
:: are made in Canada are actually made in the United States, or by American
:: corporations.
::
:: The "boycott" officially began in July, in response to the Trump
:: Administration's new 20% tariff on Canadian steel (and a host of other,
: less
:: significant tariffs on things like Canadian aluminum), and after
President
:: Donald Trump called Prime Minister Justin Trudeau "weak" at a meeting of
: the
:: "group of 7." Angry at being disrespected, Canadians pledged to purge
: their
:: shopping carts of anything made below their southern border.
::
:: "Usually we don't pay that much attention to it," one Canadian consumer
: told
:: the WJS. "You tend to buy the products that taste good or you buy the
:: products that are low in price where taste isn't an issue." But, he
added,
:: this summer it got personal.
::
:: Most products assumed to be Canadian, though, are actually American. Old
:: Dutch chips, for example, are mostly consumed in Canada, but are made in
:: Minnesota. And, it turns out, Americans make a lot of products that
people
:: use every day. Canadians might be able to do without Heinz ketchup, but
: they
:: probably won't give up drinking Starbucks or Coca-Cola, using Apple and
:: Microsoft technology, eating at McDonalds or wearing American-made
: clothing.
:: If they do, they'll hurt local Canadian franchise owners before they harm
:: American business interests.
::
:: And where brands are "uniquely Canadian," chances are they're
subsidiaries
:: of global conglomerates headquartered in the United States. Unilever,
: Kraft,
:: and Proctor & Gamble make most toiletries, packaged food products, and
:: household goods sold in the U.S. and Canada.
::
:: Nearly 20% of American exports go to Canada. And they like it that way.
::
:: There's also another facet: some products that Canadians assume are
:: American, like Haagen Dazs, are actually Canadian.
::
:: The "close, personal" relationship is probably one reason that Donald
: Trump
:: believes levying tariffs on Canadian goods will help equalize trade: if
: you
:: can't go without American products, you're more likely to find your way
to
:: the bargaining table to keep those goods flowing.
::
:: https://tinyurl.com/y77efss8
::
:
:

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