Discussion:
Fake news - misleading statistics - can anything be done?
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R. Mark Clayton
2017-04-15 08:43:16 UTC
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Since the government announce new grammar schools could open, we have been flooded with claims about how socially divisive they are, back up by stat's showing that children from deprived backgrounds don't go to them: -

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/tories-fiddling-figures-make-case-10216213

but of course the article omits the fact that the few remaining grammar schools are almost all in relatively affluent areas, such as the home counties - deprived areas like the big northern cities (Trafford excepted) closed down their grammar schools half a century ago and ran schools badly - e.g. Manchester slammed by Ofsted soon after it was created.


In addition, whilst the jury is still out (for the politically correct anyway) on whether intelligence is heritable - whether it is nature (genetic) or nurture (dumped in front of the telly with a dummy in their mouths) children from deprived families are typically a already year behind their peers when they first arrive at school - so their chances of academic progress are already hampered before they even encounter their first teacher.

http://cpag.org.uk/content/impact-poverty

I haven't got a torch for grammar schools, but should socialist spouting get a Google going over?

http://www.theindychannel.com/newsy/google-will-start-factchecking-fake-news-stories
Phi
2017-04-15 10:04:56 UTC
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"R. Mark Clayton" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message news:18655709-ee55-4fe0-a593-***@googlegroups.com...
Since the government announce new grammar schools could open, we have been
flooded with claims about how socially divisive they are, back up by stat's
showing that children from deprived backgrounds don't go to them: -

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/tories-fiddling-figures-make-case-10216213

but of course the article omits the fact that the few remaining grammar
schools are almost all in relatively affluent areas, such as the home
counties - deprived areas like the big northern cities (Trafford excepted)
closed down their grammar schools half a century ago and ran schools badly -
e.g. Manchester slammed by Ofsted soon after it was created.


In addition, whilst the jury is still out (for the politically correct
anyway) on whether intelligence is heritable - whether it is nature
(genetic) or nurture (dumped in front of the telly with a dummy in their
mouths) children from deprived families are typically a already year behind
their peers when they first arrive at school - so their chances of academic
progress are already hampered before they even encounter their first
teacher.

http://cpag.org.uk/content/impact-poverty

I haven't got a torch for grammar schools, but should socialist spouting get
a Google going over?

http://www.theindychannel.com/newsy/google-will-start-factchecking-fake-news-stories


A lot depends on the attitude of the parents. Obviously the child has to
have a reasonable to start with, but if there is no educational help in the
home then only really exceptional children will advance on their own
efforts. There is nothing wrong with Grammar schools giving the brighter
children a good chance in life, unfortunately I failed my eleven plus.
Phi
2017-04-15 10:13:58 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Since the government announce new grammar schools could open, we have been
flooded with claims about how socially divisive they are, back up by
stat's showing that children from deprived backgrounds don't go to them: -
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/tories-fiddling-figures-make-case-10216213
but of course the article omits the fact that the few remaining grammar
schools are almost all in relatively affluent areas, such as the home
counties - deprived areas like the big northern cities (Trafford excepted)
closed down their grammar schools half a century ago and ran schools
badly - e.g. Manchester slammed by Ofsted soon after it was created.
In addition, whilst the jury is still out (for the politically correct
anyway) on whether intelligence is heritable - whether it is nature
(genetic) or nurture (dumped in front of the telly with a dummy in their
mouths) children from deprived families are typically a already year
behind their peers when they first arrive at school - so their chances of
academic progress are already hampered before they even encounter their
first teacher.
http://cpag.org.uk/content/impact-poverty
I haven't got a torch for grammar schools, but should socialist spouting
get a Google going over?
http://www.theindychannel.com/newsy/google-will-start-factchecking-fake-news-stories
A lot depends on the attitude of the parents. Obviously the child has to
have a reasonable to start with, but if there is no educational help in
the home then only really exceptional children will advance on their own
efforts. There is nothing wrong with Grammar schools giving the brighter
children a good chance in life, unfortunately I failed my eleven plus.
Should read ......'a reasonable IQ to start with'
Fredxxx
2017-04-15 09:27:44 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Since the government announce new grammar schools could open, we have
been flooded with claims about how socially divisive they are, back up
by stat's showing that children from deprived backgrounds don't go to
them: -
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/tories-fiddling-figures-make-case-10216213
but of course the article omits the fact that the few remaining grammar
schools are almost all in relatively affluent areas, such as the home
counties - deprived areas like the big northern cities (Trafford
excepted) closed down their grammar schools half a century ago and ran
schools badly - e.g. Manchester slammed by Ofsted soon after it was
created.
In addition, whilst the jury is still out (for the politically correct
anyway) on whether intelligence is heritable - whether it is nature
(genetic) or nurture (dumped in front of the telly with a dummy in their
mouths) children from deprived families are typically a already year
behind their peers when they first arrive at school - so their chances
of academic progress are already hampered before they even encounter
their first teacher.
http://cpag.org.uk/content/impact-poverty
I haven't got a torch for grammar schools, but should socialist spouting
get a Google going over?
http://www.theindychannel.com/newsy/google-will-start-factchecking-fake-news-stories
A lot depends on the attitude of the parents. Obviously the child has to
have a reasonable to start with, but if there is no educational help in
the home then only really exceptional children will advance on their own
efforts. There is nothing wrong with Grammar schools giving the brighter
children a good chance in life, unfortunately I failed my eleven plus.
I think more streaming in secondary schools would be just as good, where
there is greater scope for moving pupils into the right class.

Often a child will excel in one area, and streaming for each subject
would offer the best all round solution.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-04-15 10:11:51 UTC
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Post by Fredxxx
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Since the government announce new grammar schools could open, we have
been flooded with claims about how socially divisive they are, back up
by stat's showing that children from deprived backgrounds don't go to
them: -
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/tories-fiddling-figures-make-case-10216213
but of course the article omits the fact that the few remaining grammar
schools are almost all in relatively affluent areas, such as the home
counties - deprived areas like the big northern cities (Trafford
excepted) closed down their grammar schools half a century ago and ran
schools badly - e.g. Manchester slammed by Ofsted soon after it was
created.
In addition, whilst the jury is still out (for the politically correct
anyway) on whether intelligence is heritable - whether it is nature
(genetic) or nurture (dumped in front of the telly with a dummy in their
mouths) children from deprived families are typically a already year
behind their peers when they first arrive at school - so their chances
of academic progress are already hampered before they even encounter
their first teacher.
http://cpag.org.uk/content/impact-poverty
I haven't got a torch for grammar schools, but should socialist spouting
get a Google going over?
http://www.theindychannel.com/newsy/google-will-start-factchecking-fake-news-stories
A lot depends on the attitude of the parents. Obviously the child has to
have a reasonable to start with, but if there is no educational help in
the home then only really exceptional children will advance on their own
efforts. There is nothing wrong with Grammar schools giving the brighter
children a good chance in life, unfortunately I failed my eleven plus.
I think more streaming in secondary schools would be just as good, where
there is greater scope for moving pupils into the right class.
Often a child will excel in one area, and streaming for each subject
would offer the best all round solution.
That is called setting. I was good at maths and science, average for languages and not very artistic or musical. IMO keeping children grouped together roughly by ability for each subject makes for the most efficient and effective teaching.
JNugent
2017-04-17 01:35:52 UTC
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Ban The Guardian and the Daily Mirror?



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