Discussion:
Chart showing hard Brexit cost to UK business
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MM
2017-10-02 08:25:04 UTC
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This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major decline for
British exporters:

http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness

MM

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R. Mark Clayton
2017-10-02 14:06:42 UTC
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Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major decline for
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT as well.
James Harris
2017-10-02 14:23:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major decline for
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they will try to
control London after we leave?
--
James Harris
R. Mark Clayton
2017-10-02 16:28:13 UTC
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SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes

http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-monitoring-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit

The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.

With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in, but with one rate for internal transfers and another [higher] rate for external ones. They will probably get rid of the automatic passporting of UK financial services, so many hoops to jump through.

As financial services is the UK's biggest export earner this could seriously damage the UK and the City in particular.

Financial firms are pretty savvy, ruthless and fairly mobile - if this is botched, watch UK firms up sticks if Brexit is blown...
Post by James Harris
--
James Harris
well probably too late now anyway - Lloyds of Dublin!... : -


https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/sep/19/lloyds-of-london-dublin-brexit-xl-group-eu-single-market
http://www.allaboutfinancecareers.co.uk/finance-news/more-financial-services-to-move-to-dublin
http://uk.businessinsider.com/12-city-banks-relocating-to-dublin-after-brexit-2017-6
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/brexit-latest-news-banks-move-9000-jobs-britain-mainland-europe-eu-european-union-jpmorgan-hsbc-a7724231.html
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/brexit-10000-finance-jobs-will-leave-uk-survey-frankfurt-paris-a7953216.html
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/09/26/lloyds-move-1000-scottish-widows-staff-outsourcing-firm/

Maybe City bankers will see a Brexit bonus, but which city will they be in when they do?
James Harris
2017-10-02 18:57:14 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes
http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-monitoring-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit
The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.
With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in, but with one rate for internal transfers and another [higher] rate for external ones. They will probably get rid of the automatic passporting of UK financial services, so many hoops to jump through.
As financial services is the UK's biggest export earner this could seriously damage the UK and the City in particular.
Financial firms are pretty savvy, ruthless and fairly mobile - if this is botched, watch UK firms up sticks if Brexit is blown...
I haven't seen the finances involved but given the small operations the
London banks are setting up in European cities (in preparation for UK-EU
talks to not go well) it would appear that the exodus from London is not
going to be of Biblical proportions (sic).

Given that, my strong preference would be for the UK to become
completely detached from European banking rules. They (the EU) can have
their banking and tax it to their hearts' content.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by James Harris
--
James Harris
well probably too late now anyway - Lloyds of Dublin!... : -
Good! The more liberty London has the more successful it is likely to be
on the world stage.

...
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Maybe City bankers will see a Brexit bonus, but which city will they be in when they do?
One of the good things about the offices the banks have been setting up
on the continent is that they are in different cities. No one city is
attracting London's business.
--
James Harris
pamela
2017-10-02 19:23:23 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT
as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they
will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes
http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-monitor
ing-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit
The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.
With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in, but
with one rate for internal transfers and another [higher] rate
for external ones. They will probably get rid of the automatic
passporting of UK financial services, so many hoops to jump
through.
As financial services is the UK's biggest export earner this
could seriously damage the UK and the City in particular.
Financial firms are pretty savvy, ruthless and fairly mobile -
if this is botched, watch UK firms up sticks if Brexit is
blown...
It's hard to believe the EU will allow the bulk of it's financial
work (such as raising capital, money transmission, clearing, stock
exchange, commodities trading, etc) to take place in an outside
country. At the very least I can see the EU will wish for its own
regulations.

Also let's not forget that somewhat dubious financial activity has
always gone lightly regulated and lightly punished in London.

I can't see the City getting bigger after Brexit but I can see it
getting smaller.
James Harris
2017-10-02 20:27:19 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT
as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they
will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes
http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-monitor
ing-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit
The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.
With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in, but
with one rate for internal transfers and another [higher] rate
for external ones. They will probably get rid of the automatic
passporting of UK financial services, so many hoops to jump
through.
As financial services is the UK's biggest export earner this
could seriously damage the UK and the City in particular.
Financial firms are pretty savvy, ruthless and fairly mobile -
if this is botched, watch UK firms up sticks if Brexit is
blown...
It's hard to believe the EU will allow the bulk of it's financial
work (such as raising capital, money transmission, clearing, stock
exchange, commodities trading, etc) to take place in an outside
country. At the very least I can see the EU will wish for its own
regulations.
Also let's not forget that somewhat dubious financial activity has
always gone lightly regulated and lightly punished in London.
I can't see the City getting bigger after Brexit but I can see it
getting smaller.
The City will get smaller at the start and may even fall behind New
York. But over time if the EU and the UK follow the courses they've been
on for many years, I'm pretty sure that firms will want to use London
(or New York) where they can.

You might find this helpful from Barclays' boss:

“The users of capital find the providers of capital, not the other way
around, and the providers of capital, by and large, are resident in
London and New York,” Mr Staley told the Financial Times’s Banking
Summit. “I don’t think London will lose its gravitational pull in terms
of management of capital in any reasonable timeframe.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/11/16/barclays-boss-londons-gravitational-pull-on-finance-will-not-wan/

That mirrors what others have said. Post Brexit, it won't so much be a
case of London needing access to Europe but of Europe needing access to
London. Something to think about!
--
James Harris
tim...
2017-10-04 15:42:55 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT
as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they
will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes
http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-monitor
ing-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit
The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.
With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in, but
with one rate for internal transfers and another [higher] rate
for external ones. They will probably get rid of the automatic
passporting of UK financial services, so many hoops to jump
through.
As financial services is the UK's biggest export earner this
could seriously damage the UK and the City in particular.
Financial firms are pretty savvy, ruthless and fairly mobile -
if this is botched, watch UK firms up sticks if Brexit is
blown...
It's hard to believe the EU will allow the bulk of it's financial
work (such as raising capital, money transmission, clearing, stock
exchange, commodities trading, etc) to take place in an outside
country.
how are they going to stop it?

If the money that you wish to borrow resides outside of the EU (as most of
it does) any attempt to insist that the broking house organising the
transaction was domiciled in the EU would likely see you fail to obtain the
funds that you need.

tim
James Harris
2017-10-04 16:52:49 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by tim...
Post by pamela
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT
as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they
will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes
http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-monitor
ing-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit
The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.
With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in, but
with one rate for internal transfers and another [higher] rate
for external ones. They will probably get rid of the automatic
passporting of UK financial services, so many hoops to jump
through.
As financial services is the UK's biggest export earner this
could seriously damage the UK and the City in particular.
Financial firms are pretty savvy, ruthless and fairly mobile -
if this is botched, watch UK firms up sticks if Brexit is
blown...
It's hard to believe the EU will allow the bulk of it's financial
work (such as raising capital, money transmission, clearing, stock
exchange, commodities trading, etc) to take place in an outside
country.
how are they going to stop it?
If the money that you wish to borrow resides outside of the EU (as most of
it does) any attempt to insist that the broking house organising the
transaction was domiciled in the EU would likely see you fail to obtain the
funds that you need.
As I posted earlier in reply to someone, Jes Staley, chief executive of
Barclays, pointed out that rather than simply London needing access to
the EU the EU will want access to London as a source of finance. "The
users of capital find the providers of capital, not the other way
around". Of course, it's a two-way street but his comments nonetheless
give an idea of priorities.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/11/16/barclays-boss-londons-gravitational-pull-on-finance-will-not-wan/
--
James Harris
pamela
2017-10-04 17:54:59 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by James Harris
Post by tim...
Post by pamela
On Monday, 2 October 2017 15:23:31 UTC+1, James Harris
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector
most vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit
by FTT as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes
http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-
moni
Post by James Harris
Post by tim...
Post by pamela
tor ing-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit
The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.
With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in,
but with one rate for internal transfers and another [higher]
rate for external ones. They will probably get rid of the
automatic passporting of UK financial services, so many hoops
to jump through.
As financial services is the UK's biggest export earner this
could seriously damage the UK and the City in particular.
Financial firms are pretty savvy, ruthless and fairly mobile
- if this is botched, watch UK firms up sticks if Brexit is
blown...
It's hard to believe the EU will allow the bulk of it's
financial work (such as raising capital, money transmission,
clearing, stock exchange, commodities trading, etc) to take
place in an outside country.
how are they going to stop it?
If the money that you wish to borrow resides outside of the EU
(as most of it does) any attempt to insist that the broking
house organising the transaction was domiciled in the EU would
likely see you fail to obtain the funds that you need.
As I posted earlier in reply to someone, Jes Staley, chief
executive of Barclays, pointed out that rather than simply
London needing access to the EU the EU will want access to
London as a source of finance. "The users of capital find the
providers of capital, not the other way around". Of course, it's
a two-way street but his comments nonetheless give an idea of
priorities.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/11/16/barclays-
boss-londons-gravitational-pull-on-finance-will-not-wan/
With a few exceptions (such as EU financial institutions like
EBRD, EIB, CEB, etc), I would agree that the EU is not going to
intervene on its own account in capital markets nor in other city
activities but it is the EU who can set rules, restrictions and
tax laws for its members to abide by.

It is mainly such a changed regulatory framework which could
easily make the City less attractive to the EU.

Even if the City somehow manages to remain the financial centre of
all Europe, the EU can still arrange to take its share of the
profits. The City has been a thorn in the flesh of the EU even
while the UK is a member and I imagine the EU will now use the
flux Brexit causes to make some changes.

tim...
2017-10-04 15:38:33 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT as well.
The FTT is something the EU wants, isn't it? You think they will try to
control London after we leave?
Yes
http://www.euronews.com/2017/09/19/eu-to-propose-stronger-monitoring-of-uk-financial-firms-after-brexit
The UK managed to stave FTT off so far from inside the EU.
With the UK outside the EU it will probably be brought in, but with one
rate for internal transfers and another [higher] rate for external ones.
ITYF that's called protectionism and would be illegal under WTO rules

tim
pamela
2017-10-03 09:39:27 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT as
well.
Including financial services makes that chart even grimmer.

These days I don't suppose such charts trouble hardcore Brexiteers
because they have stopped claiming Brexit will bring the UK
economic benefits. Also, immigration doesn't look as if it will be
vastly changed. And Euro legislation we have already adopted may not
get vastly altered.

So instead the Brexit delusion now focuses on intangible
nationalistic sentiment..... sovereign Parliament, free people,
Magna Carter, escape from Euro-laws, her Majesty, what we always
wanted, escape from Euro-regulation, feet and inches, for which
someone here recently pointed out they would pay "any cost".
James Harris
2017-10-03 20:03:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT as
well.
Including financial services makes that chart even grimmer.
I may be wrong but at this stage, Pamela, you appear to have queried the
PwC chart but accepted the one above. Do you know why you treated them
differently? Could it be because the one above said what you wanted to
believe?

The one above was not even sourced. It had no provenance shown. It was
not dated. The assumptions on which is it based were not mentioned. Yet,
people - many people - are willing to believe what it says.

It's hard to have a discussion of reality when people let preconceptions
guide them.

Please note, as mentioned in my other post, I have not claimed either
graph to be a true forecast.
--
James Harris
pamela
2017-10-03 21:48:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Harris
Post by pamela
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT
as well.
Including financial services makes that chart even grimmer.
I may be wrong but at this stage, Pamela, you appear to have
queried the PwC chart but accepted the one above. Do you know
why you treated them differently? Could it be because the one
above said what you wanted to believe?
I queried the PWC chart because it was something Leavers chose to
disparage at the time of the referendum and it is hypocritical of
them, imcluding you, to attempt to make use of its veracity now.

Secondly, the chart is very ourof date andth assumption sused at
the tme have been significantly refined since then. It would be
wiser to use more up to data.

I sem to recall there was caution about that graph which said not
to use it to determine trend. You have also pointed out several
times lately that the time period is important.
Post by James Harris
The one above was not even sourced. It had no provenance shown.
It was not dated. The assumptions on which is it based were not
mentioned. Yet, people - many people - are willing to believe
what it says.
I have not checked for the sources of the graphic so I can't
comment on them. However if it is of typical reliability then it
paints a worrying picture. A very worrying picture.
Post by James Harris
It's hard to have a discussion of reality when people let
preconceptions guide them.
Please note, as mentioned in my other post, I have not claimed
either graph to be a true forecast.
Nor should you and nor should I. The current trend seems to be to
expect far less economically from Brexit - to the point of
expecting a financial loss. Some were saying this before the
referendum.
James Harris
2017-10-04 09:32:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
Post by pamela
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
They missed out financial services - probably the sector most
vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit by FTT
as well.
Including financial services makes that chart even grimmer.
I may be wrong but at this stage, Pamela, you appear to have
queried the PwC chart but accepted the one above. Do you know
why you treated them differently? Could it be because the one
above said what you wanted to believe?
I queried the PWC chart because it was something Leavers chose to
disparage at the time of the referendum and it is hypocritical of
them, imcluding you, to attempt to make use of its veracity now.
My personal view of it has not changed. I am not responsible for what
Remainers or Leavers made of it.
Post by pamela
Secondly, the chart is very ourof date andth assumption sused at
the tme have been significantly refined since then. It would be
wiser to use more up to data.
Except when refuting a claim such as yours about what those in power
"know". It was an ideal graph from an ideal time to illustrate what they
"knew" in contrast to what they told _us_.

Claims of what Remainers "know" will happen - especially to the economy
- continue apace.
Post by pamela
I sem to recall there was caution about that graph which said not
to use it to determine trend. You have also pointed out several
times lately that the time period is important.
Post by James Harris
The one above was not even sourced. It had no provenance shown.
It was not dated. The assumptions on which is it based were not
mentioned. Yet, people - many people - are willing to believe
what it says.
I have not checked for the sources of the graphic so I can't
comment on them. However if it is of typical reliability then it
paints a worrying picture. A very worrying picture.
People knew the earth was flat. People knew the emperor was wearing
clothes. And people knew we needed to be in the euro.

In other words, popularity of opinion is no proof. Just because someone
produces a graph which fits what we expect does not mean that that graph
is true or helpful.
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
It's hard to have a discussion of reality when people let
preconceptions guide them.
Please note, as mentioned in my other post, I have not claimed
either graph to be a true forecast.
Nor should you and nor should I. The current trend seems to be to
expect far less economically from Brexit - to the point of
expecting a financial loss. Some were saying this before the
referendum.
Argh, "the current trend"!
--
James Harris
pamela
2017-10-04 10:04:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Harris
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
Post by pamela
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
They missed out financial services - probably the sector
most vulnerable to non tariff barriers and likely to be hit
by FTT as well.
Including financial services makes that chart even grimmer.
I may be wrong but at this stage, Pamela, you appear to have
queried the PwC chart but accepted the one above. Do you know
why you treated them differently? Could it be because the one
above said what you wanted to believe?
I queried the PWC chart because it was something Leavers chose
to disparage at the time of the referendum and it is
hypocritical of them, imcluding you, to attempt to make use of
its veracity now.
My personal view of it has not changed. I am not responsible for
what Remainers or Leavers made of it.
Post by pamela
Secondly, the chart is very ourof date andth assumption sused
at the tme have been significantly refined since then. It
would be wiser to use more up to data.
Except when refuting a claim such as yours about what those in
power "know". It was an ideal graph from an ideal time to
illustrate what they "knew" in contrast to what they told _us_.
Claims of what Remainers "know" will happen - especially to the
economy - continue apace.
Post by pamela
I sem to recall there was caution about that graph which said
not to use it to determine trend. You have also pointed out
several times lately that the time period is important.
Post by James Harris
The one above was not even sourced. It had no provenance
shown. It was not dated. The assumptions on which is it based
were not mentioned. Yet, people - many people - are willing to
believe what it says.
I have not checked for the sources of the graphic so I can't
comment on them. However if it is of typical reliability then
it paints a worrying picture. A very worrying picture.
People knew the earth was flat. People knew the emperor was
wearing clothes. And people knew we needed to be in the euro.
In other words, popularity of opinion is no proof. Just because
someone produces a graph which fits what we expect does not mean
that that graph is true or helpful.
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
It's hard to have a discussion of reality when people let
preconceptions guide them.
Please note, as mentioned in my other post, I have not claimed
either graph to be a true forecast.
Nor should you and nor should I. The current trend seems to be
to expect far less economically from Brexit - to the point of
expecting a financial loss. Some were saying this before the
referendum.
Argh, "the current trend"!
You were not referring to the prevailing information back in March
2016 but actually you were referring to a comment I made about the
present....

It's very simple. Just leave. Any future trade with the EU done
under WTO rules. Luckily, those in power know this would be
economic suicide.

http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=150711130000
James Harris
2017-10-04 14:33:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
...
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
Please note, as mentioned in my other post, I have not claimed
either graph to be a true forecast.
Nor should you and nor should I. The current trend seems to be
to expect far less economically from Brexit - to the point of
expecting a financial loss. Some were saying this before the
referendum.
Argh, "the current trend"!
You were not referring to the prevailing information back in March
2016 but actually you were referring to a comment I made about the
present....
It's very simple. Just leave. Any future trade with the EU done
under WTO rules. Luckily, those in power know this would be
economic suicide.
http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=150711130000
Just because something is "the current trend" does not make it true. I
don't know how else to put it!
--
James Harris
pamela
2017-10-04 17:43:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Harris
...
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
Post by pamela
Post by James Harris
Please note, as mentioned in my other post, I have not
claimed either graph to be a true forecast.
Nor should you and nor should I. The current trend seems to
be to expect far less economically from Brexit - to the point
of expecting a financial loss. Some were saying this before
the referendum.
Argh, "the current trend"!
You were not referring to the prevailing information back in
March 2016 but actually you were referring to a comment I made
about the present....
It's very simple. Just leave. Any future trade with the EU
done under WTO rules. Luckily, those in power know this
would be economic suicide.
http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=150711130000
Just because something is "the current trend" does not make it
true. I don't know how else to put it!
We have a constantly shifting baseline from which, with new facts
and ew assumptions, we can make different scenarios. There is
never an absolutely right prediction (except by chance). However
we can use the best projections and factor in the costs of
success/failure to give an idea of what option we should be
choosing.

Unfortunately there was an early reliance on the argument that "we
can always trade with WTO rules because this arrangement is quite
good" and this bravado hasn't gone away even though the sunny
outlook argument was conjoured up without much thought as a form
of face saving by the Brexiteers who were uncertain that they
could cut other good trade deals.
James Hammerton
2017-10-03 16:51:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major decline for
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
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Who produced this chart?

How were those figures computed?

Regards,

James
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James Hammerton
http://jhammerton.wordpress.com
http://www.magnacartaplus.com/
MM
2017-10-04 09:47:25 UTC
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On Tue, 3 Oct 2017 17:51:06 +0100, James Hammerton
Post by James Hammerton
Post by MM
This chart shows how a hard Brexit could result in a major decline for
http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexitcosttobusiness
MM
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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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Who produced this chart?
How were those figures computed?
As I posted on 2/Oct/17, Baker McKenzie.

The article in full plus chart is here (scroll down):
"Hard Brexit would cost UK manufacturing £17bn/year"
https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2017/oct/02/uk-manufacturing-growth-hard-brexit-eurozone-monarch-airline-fails-business-live?page=with:block-59d1e182e4b00d657809cd27#block-59d1e182e4b00d657809cd27

Or: http://tinyurl.com/hardbrexit17bn

MM
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