Discussion:
Brexit is a golden opportunity for businesses like Tate & Lyle Sugars
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Bod
2017-11-08 10:23:27 UTC
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Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard – and cost British jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.

But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.

Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger choice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also boost
our exports.

http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
pamela
2017-11-08 11:26:23 UTC
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Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs
and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These discriminate
against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of EU beet sugar
producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive UK
market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
The less sugar we eat, the better for our health.

Fancy clutching onto the profits made by a sugar manufacturer as a
way of justifying Brexit!
Bod
2017-11-08 11:29:15 UTC
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Post by pamela
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs
and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These discriminate
against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of EU beet sugar
producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive UK
market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
The less sugar we eat, the better for our health.
Fancy clutching onto the profits made by a sugar manufacturer as a
way of justifying Brexit!
What's wrong with that?
--
Bod
pamela
2017-11-08 12:00:40 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by pamela
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs
and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These discriminate
against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of EU beet sugar
producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive UK
market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
The less sugar we eat, the better for our health.
Fancy clutching onto the profits made by a sugar manufacturer as a
way of justifying Brexit!
What's wrong with that?
Major industry, huh? I think we could live without it.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-08 16:06:14 UTC
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Post by pamela
Post by Bod
Post by pamela
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs
and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These discriminate
against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of EU beet sugar
producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive UK
market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
The less sugar we eat, the better for our health.
Fancy clutching onto the profits made by a sugar manufacturer as a
way of justifying Brexit!
What's wrong with that?
Major industry, huh? I think we could live without it.
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
--
Hard work pays off in the future. Laziness pays off now.
Ian Jackson
2017-11-08 17:34:51 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar. Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat - and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
--
Ian
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-08 18:55:04 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar.
Amino acids - er no,

Fats - er no,
Post by Ian Jackson
Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat
Glycogen initially, only later into fat.
Post by Ian Jackson
- and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
--
Ian
Ian Jackson
2017-11-08 19:46:48 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar.
Amino acids - er no,
Fats - er no,
Post by Ian Jackson
Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat
Glycogen initially, only later into fat.
I'm only parroting what a doctor (answering callers' questions) said on
one of last night's LBC phone-ins.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
- and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
That's the last time I trust what I hear on LBC!
--
Ian
Christie
2017-11-08 20:27:28 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar.
Amino acids - er no,
Fats - er no,
Post by Ian Jackson
Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat
Glycogen initially, only later into fat.
I'm only parroting what a doctor (answering callers' questions) said on
one of last night's LBC phone-ins.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
- and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
That's the last time I trust what I hear on LBC!
What about all the previous anti-brexiteer stuff you've heard on LBC,
though? I bet you're still going to trust in that!
Ian Jackson
2017-11-08 21:25:15 UTC
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Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar.
Amino acids - er no,
Fats - er no,
Post by Ian Jackson
Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat
Glycogen initially, only later into fat.
I'm only parroting what a doctor (answering callers' questions) said on
one of last night's LBC phone-ins.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
- and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
That's the last time I trust what I hear on LBC!
What about all the previous anti-brexiteer stuff you've heard on LBC,
though? I bet you're still going to trust in that!
Certainly. My faith in LBC is totally shattered.
--
Ian
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-09 01:12:19 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar.
Amino acids - er no,
Fats - er no,
Post by Ian Jackson
Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat
Glycogen initially, only later into fat.
I'm only parroting what a doctor (answering callers' questions) said on
one of last night's LBC phone-ins.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
- and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
That's the last time I trust what I hear on LBC!
What about all the previous anti-brexiteer stuff you've heard on LBC,
though? I bet you're still going to trust in that!
Certainly. My faith in LBC is totally shattered.
Don't believe anything you hear. Food goes into your mouth. If too much food, you get fat. Fat used later when you're starving.
--
When you own Llamas... spit happens
The Peeler
2017-11-09 11:11:43 UTC
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On Thu, 09 Nov 2017 01:12:19 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Ian Jackson
Certainly. My faith in LBC is totally shattered.
Don't believe anything you hear.
No one should definitely believe any of the sick shit you keep spouting here
around the clock, attention whore!
--
More of wanker Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) twisted
sexuality:
"Facial hair is the same as pubic hair, therefore disgusting."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Christie
2017-11-09 09:51:29 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar.
Amino acids - er no,
Fats - er no,
Post by Ian Jackson
Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat
Glycogen initially, only later into fat.
I'm only parroting what a doctor (answering callers' questions) said on
one of last night's LBC phone-ins.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
- and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
That's the last time I trust what I hear on LBC!
What about all the previous anti-brexiteer stuff you've heard on LBC,
though? I bet you're still going to trust in that!
Certainly. My faith in LBC is totally shattered.
:) Somewhat strangely, your message is coming through clearly (the
English language is a wonderful thing).

I guess, unless something seismic happens relatively soon, there is
going to be enough happening to feed the confirmation bias of
confirmed 'leavers' and 'remainers' such that the ride we are on
remains bumpy for ages to come. But, anyway, at this point of time,
from a democratic point of view at least, I would have thought the
decent thing for us all to accept is that we are all Brexiteers.
pamela
2017-11-09 10:47:48 UTC
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Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
.......
Post by Ian Jackson
That's the last time I trust what I hear on LBC!
What about all the previous anti-brexiteer stuff you've heard
on LBC, though? I bet you're still going to trust in that!
Certainly. My faith in LBC is totally shattered.
:) Somewhat strangely, your message is coming through clearly
:(the English language is a wonderful thing).
I guess, unless something seismic happens relatively soon, there
is going to be enough happening to feed the confirmation bias of
confirmed 'leavers' and 'remainers' such that the ride we are on
remains bumpy for ages to come. But, anyway, at this point of
time, from a democratic point of view at least, I would have
thought the decent thing for us all to accept is that we are all
Brexiteers.
Has there been anything to provide confirmation bias for Brexiteers?

Not a single thing has emerged to Brexiteer's advantage which they
might turn into confirmation that they were right.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-09 10:26:42 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into sugar.
Amino acids - er no,
Fats - er no,
Post by Ian Jackson
Some
things take longer to convert than others. Sugar that is surplus to
immediate requirements gets stored as fat
Glycogen initially, only later into fat.
I'm only parroting what a doctor (answering callers' questions) said on
one of last night's LBC phone-ins.
A reasonable simplification.
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Ian Jackson
- and sugar surpluses (even if
only temporary) are most likely to occur when we consume substantial
quantities of stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to
get re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin again.
That's the last time I trust what I hear on LBC!
That bit is true - fat represents an energy reserve, even if you starve it only gets used up slowly.
Post by Ian Jackson
--
Ian
pamela
2017-11-08 20:51:10 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much
food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely to
occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with a
high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if we
then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-08 21:33:31 UTC
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Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely to
occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with a
high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if we
then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into sugar, then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what you eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
--
The problem with today's society is adults are treated like children, children are treated like retards, and retards are exempt from the law.
The Peeler
2017-11-08 21:55:31 UTC
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On Wed, 08 Nov 2017 21:33:31 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into sugar,
then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what you eat, if you eat
too much it will get stored.
Who taught you that BULLSHIT, Birdbrain? Did you perhaps just read it on
Usenet? LOL
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) retarded "mind":
"A cyclist is more similar in power, weight, and speed, to a pedestrian, so
fits in better on the pavement."
MID: <***@red.lan>
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-09 10:28:02 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely to
occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with a
high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if we
then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into sugar, then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what you eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
You are underthinking - carbohydrates get converted into sugar. Amino acids (protein) and fat do not - they are absorbed directly.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
--
The problem with today's society is adults are treated like children, children are treated like retards, and retards are exempt from the law.
pamela
2017-11-09 10:52:51 UTC
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On Wednesday, 8 November 2017 21:33:34 UTC, James Wilkinson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too
much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat
- and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most
likely to occur when we consume substantial quantities of
stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take
some time to get re-converted into sugar - but when they do,
we become thin again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into
sugar, then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what
you eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
You are underthinking - carbohydrates get converted into sugar.
Amino acids (protein) and fat do not - they are absorbed
directly.
Protein ends up with nitrogen stripped away and then follows carbs
into the citric acid cycle.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-09 12:49:23 UTC
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Post by pamela
On Wednesday, 8 November 2017 21:33:34 UTC, James Wilkinson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat
- and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most
likely to occur when we consume substantial quantities of
stuff with a high sugar content. We then become physically
fat. Even if we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take
some time to get re-converted into sugar - but when they do,
we become thin again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into
sugar, then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what
you eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
You are underthinking - carbohydrates get converted into sugar.
Amino acids (protein) and fat do not - they are absorbed
directly.
Protein ends up with nitrogen stripped away and then follows carbs
into the citric acid cycle.
And makes your farts smell of oranges?
--
Depression is merely anger without enthusiasm.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-09 12:49:02 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely to
occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with a
high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if we
then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into sugar, then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what you eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
You are underthinking - carbohydrates get converted into sugar. Amino acids (protein) and fat do not - they are absorbed directly.
Yeah right. So you're telling me I can eat 15 million tonnes of carbs without getting fat. Pull the other one.

Anyway, why bother working out what each food contains? Eat the foods you enjoy eating, but only eat as much as you need! You don't put 100 litres of petrol in your car when it only needs 50 do you?
--
US PGA Commentator - "One of the reasons Arnie is playing so well is that, before each tee shot, his wife takes out his balls and kisses them."
And Johnny Carson famously commented "That must make his little putter stand up"
pamela
2017-11-09 10:56:31 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too
much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely
to occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with
a high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if
we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into
sugar,
That's a confusing way to put it. Ribose may be a sugar but table
sugar is not ribose.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what you
eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-09 12:33:49 UTC
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Post by pamela
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too
much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely
to occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with
a high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if
we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into
sugar,
That's a confusing way to put it. Ribose may be a sugar but table
sugar is not ribose.
What's confusing about what I said? I made it into the simplest form. Your body converts whatever you eat into energy. If you eat more than you burn off, it goes into fat. EAT LESS FOOD.
Post by pamela
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what you
eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
--
Never play leapfrog with a unicorn!
Yellow
2017-11-09 14:04:11 UTC
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On Thu, 09 Nov 2017 12:33:49 -0000, James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely
to occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with
a high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if
we then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
You're overthinking it. You eat anything, it gets changed into
sugar,
That's a confusing way to put it. Ribose may be a sugar but table
sugar is not ribose.
What's confusing about what I said? I made it into the simplest form. Your body converts whatever you eat into energy. If you eat more than you burn off, it goes into fat. EAT LESS FOOD.
At the risk of piling in..... you actually need to eat less calories,
not less food. And no, it is not the same thing at all.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
then either burnt off or stored. Doesn't matter what you
eat, if you eat too much it will get stored.
Again - too many calories, not too much food.
tim...
2017-11-09 15:19:29 UTC
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Post by pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
The body first tries to convert everything we take in into
sugar. Some things take longer to convert than others. Sugar
that is surplus to immediate requirements gets stored as fat -
and sugar surpluses (even if only temporary) are most likely to
occur when we consume substantial quantities of stuff with a
high sugar content. We then become physically fat. Even if we
then starve ourselves, our fat stores take some time to get
re-converted into sugar - but when they do, we become thin
again.
Refined carbs such as sugar causes syndrome X because of its
metabolic path. That's not true for unprocessed foods.
Hm,

"Cardiac syndrome X is angina "

why the fuck do you not use the name everyone knows?

tim

The Peeler
2017-11-08 18:12:52 UTC
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On Wed, 08 Nov 2017 16:06:14 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by pamela
Post by Bod
Post by pamela
Fancy clutching onto the profits made by a sugar manufacturer as a
way of justifying Brexit!
What's wrong with that?
Major industry, huh? I think we could live without it.
You don't get fat from sugar, you get fat from eating too much food.
Who mentioned fat, attention whore?
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL), the village idiot's,
sick drivel:
"99% of people are thick, ignorant, or just plain stupid."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Handsome Jack
2017-11-08 17:29:21 UTC
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Post by pamela
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs
and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These discriminate
against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of EU beet sugar
producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive UK
market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
The less sugar we eat, the better for our health.
Fancy clutching onto the profits made by a sugar manufacturer as a
way of justifying Brexit!
You cretinous oaf.
--
Jack
Fredxxx
2017-11-09 00:28:02 UTC
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Post by pamela
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs
and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These discriminate
against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of EU beet sugar
producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive UK
market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
The less sugar we eat, the better for our health.
Why do you think this? There is a weak correlation with sugar intake and
obesity and many peer reviewed studies even indicate an inverse
relationship between sugar intake and obesity.
Post by pamela
Fancy clutching onto the profits made by a sugar manufacturer as a
way of justifying Brexit!
Yes, Bod is the Brexit equivalent of MM.
pamela
2017-11-09 10:49:33 UTC
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Post by Fredxxx
Post by pamela
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs
and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These discriminate
against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of EU beet sugar
producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive
UK market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
The less sugar we eat, the better for our health.
Why do you think this? There is a weak correlation with sugar
intake and obesity and many peer reviewed studies even indicate
an inverse relationship between sugar intake and obesity.
It's not only to do with obesity but Syndrome X in which the types of
food which provide calories are significant.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-08 12:26:34 UTC
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Post by Bod
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard – and cost British jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger choice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also boost
our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to prevent it underselling similar EU foods.
pensive hamster
2017-11-08 15:55:20 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Bod
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard – and cost British jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger choice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also boost
our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to prevent it underselling similar EU foods.
Bod's sentence:

"These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers."

is potentially a bit misleading. We are also beet sugar producers,
and 2/3rds of sugar used in the UK is produced in this way:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Sugar
'British Sugar processes all sugar beet grown in the United Kingdom,
and produces about two-thirds of the United Kingdom's quota of
sugar, with the remainder covered by Tate & Lyle and imports.'

Also

'... Tate & Lyle ... is still allowed to import zero-tariff sugar from a
handful of designated markets such as Fiji, Belize and Guyana and
that are seen as supporting international development goals. [But
it has to add in shipping costs].
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/mar/27/brexit-sugar-beet-cane-tate-lyle-british-sugar

So it is a bit more complex than Bod makes out. It is not exactly
brave British Tate & Lyle battling against the evil EU and their
dastardly beet sugar producers ...
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-08 16:06:40 UTC
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Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard =E2=80=93 and cost Br=
itish jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist su=
gar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners li=
ke
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger cho=
ice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also bo=
ost
our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might =
be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK manufac=
tured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to prevent it=
underselling similar EU foods.

Could we nuke the EU?

-- =

Bill Clinton thinks "harass" is two words.
The Peeler
2017-11-08 18:12:57 UTC
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On Wed, 08 Nov 2017 16:06:40 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by R. Mark Clayton
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might be
cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK
manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to
prevent it underselling similar EU foods.
Could we nuke the EU?
Somebody needs to nuke your stupid gob, Birdbrain!
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) life as a wanker:
"When I was 14, there were places in forests where people would leave
magazines for anyone to use."
MID: <***@red.lan>
Yellow
2017-11-08 20:41:42 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Nov 2017 04:26:34 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard ? and cost British jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger choice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also boost
our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to prevent it underselling similar EU foods.
So you are happy to see consumers pay more than they need to just as
long as businesses can make bigger profits yet you continually whine
about rising prices.
pamela
2017-11-08 21:02:18 UTC
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Post by Yellow
On Wed, 8 Nov 2017 04:26:34 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard ? and cost
British jobs. The EU imposes prohibitively high import
tariffs and protectionist sugar and trade policies. These
discriminate against cane sugar refiners like us in favour of
EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK
sugar market. This will be a real success story for a UK
industry and a much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a
bigger choice of more innovative products. A more competitive
UK market can also boost our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar
might be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose
tariffs on UK manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar
(e.g. confectionery) to prevent it underselling similar EU
foods.
So you are HAPPY to see consumers pay more than they need to
just as long as businesses can make bigger profits yet you
continually whine about rising prices.
Can you show where Mark says he's HAPPY about it?
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-09 10:32:11 UTC
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Post by Yellow
On Wed, 8 Nov 2017 04:26:34 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard ? and cost British jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger choice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also boost
our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to prevent it underselling similar EU foods.
So you are happy to see consumers pay more than they need to just as
long as businesses can make bigger profits yet you continually whine
about rising prices.
Not really, but Brexiteers are.

I doubt that the UK government would reduce the tariff on sugar seeing how in the 2016 budget it imposed a direct tax on it: -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugary_drink_tax#United_Kingdom
Yellow
2017-11-09 14:01:35 UTC
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Raw Message
On Thu, 9 Nov 2017 02:32:11 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 8 Nov 2017 04:26:34 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard ? and cost British jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger choice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also boost
our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to prevent it underselling similar EU foods.
So you are happy to see consumers pay more than they need to just as
long as businesses can make bigger profits yet you continually whine
about rising prices.
Not really,
So why are you arguing that it is OK for consumers to have to pay more
for goods if it means businesses can make more profit?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
but Brexiteers are.
Er.... no. You are the one making this argument.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
I doubt that the UK government would reduce the tariff on sugar seeing how in the 2016 budget it imposed a direct tax on it: -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugary_drink_tax#United_Kingdom
And that has nothing whatsoever to do with Brexit.
tim...
2017-11-09 15:17:43 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 8 Nov 2017 04:26:34 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard ? and cost British jobs.
The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
Consumers will also win because competition will deliver a bigger choice
of more innovative products. A more competitive UK market can also boost
our exports.
http://www.brexitgoldenopportunity.com
--
Bod
If the UK tariff on sugar is decoupled from the EU's then sugar might
be cheaper in the UK. Expect to see the EU impose tariffs on UK
manufactured foods containing a lot of sugar (e.g. confectionery) to
prevent it underselling similar EU foods.
So you are happy to see consumers pay more than they need to just as
long as businesses can make bigger profits yet you continually whine
about rising prices.
Not really, but Brexiteers are.
I doubt that the UK government would reduce the tariff on sugar seeing how
in the 2016 budget it imposed a direct tax on it: -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugary_drink_tax#United_Kingdom
um, no he didn't

(you need to look up the meaning of the word "direct")

tim
Nick
2017-11-08 16:58:19 UTC
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Being in the EU has hit Tate & Lyle Sugars hard – and cost British jobs. > The EU imposes prohibitively high import tariffs and protectionist sugar
and trade policies. These discriminate against cane sugar refiners like
us in favour of EU beet sugar producers.
But after Brexit, we can have a level playing field in the UK sugar
market. This will be a real success story for a UK industry and a
much-loved British brand.
I'm confused, Tate & Lyle -sugar Refining business appears to be fully
owned by a US company. AIUI Sugar cane doesn't grow in the UK.
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