(too old to reply)
Wages paid one week in arrears
Evan
2006-12-19 01:36:52 UTC
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.

I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.

Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.

Anyone in the know?
Joe Lee
2006-12-19 03:35:55 UTC
Post by Evan
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Yes, the wages you receive in any particular week would be for the work /
number of hours you had done in the previous week.
Post by Evan
Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.
Your friends are wrong.

Happy Xmas.

Joe Lee
Evan
2006-12-19 07:36:47 UTC
Post by Joe Lee
Post by Evan
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Yes, the wages you receive in any particular week would be for the work /
number of hours you had done in the previous week.
This suggests there are some contracts that provide for payment BEFORE
the actual hours are worked. That's awfully trusting.
"nightjar" .uk.com>
2006-12-19 08:25:20 UTC
Post by Evan
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.
Anyone in the know?
As your friends suggest, it means that you would not be paid at the end of
your first week at work, but at the end of the second week and that money
would relate to your work in week one. When you leave, you would get paid
for your last week one week after you left.

It is a common system where hours are flexible, overtime is worked or there
are production bonuses. It gives the wages department time to work out the
amount to be paid, which may need to be advised to the bank up to three
working days in advance. For people who are paid a fixed salary, it is more
usual to pay at the end of the period worked, but, if the bulk of the
employees have variable payments, all may be paid one week in arrears.
Sometimes, only the variable elements of the wage are paid in arrears.

Colin Bignell
David
2006-12-19 08:45:38 UTC
Post by "nightjar" .uk.com>
Post by Evan
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.
Anyone in the know?
As your friends suggest, it means that you would not be paid at the end of
your first week at work, but at the end of the second week and that money
would relate to your work in week one. When you leave, you would get paid
for your last week one week after you left.
It is a common system where hours are flexible, overtime is worked or there
are production bonuses. It gives the wages department time to work out the
amount to be paid, which may need to be advised to the bank up to three
working days in advance. For people who are paid a fixed salary, it is more
usual to pay at the end of the period worked, but, if the bulk of the
employees have variable payments, all may be paid one week in arrears.
Sometimes, only the variable elements of the wage are paid in arrears.
Colin Bignell
Colin is perfectly correct: this pay method is also known as 'a week
lying-on' - in days gone by, in the steel industry for example, payday
was always a Thursday but for hours worked and output produced over the
previous full, 7-day working week. So new starters had to work their
first week and to wait for their pay [all in cash, in a sealed envelope
- this took ages and a small army of pay clerks to make up, for
thousands of employees on hundreds of different pay/bonus systems]]
until the following Thursday but those who left employment on a Friday
still were paid the following Thursday in respect of their last full
pay week. No doubt it's still common pay practice where pay is weekly
and/or varies with overtime and/or production bonuses. Monthly-paid
workers can be on a similar regime - have known for example monthly pay
made mid-month in respect of the previous full calendar month.
Tommo
2006-12-19 09:17:31 UTC
Post by "nightjar" .uk.com>
Post by Evan
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.
Anyone in the know?
As your friends suggest, it means that you would not be paid at the end of
your first week at work, but at the end of the second week and that money
would relate to your work in week one. When you leave, you would get paid
for your last week one week after you left.
That is how Iunderstand it as well.
M.I.5Ÿ
2006-12-19 09:23:53 UTC
Post by Joe Lee
Post by Evan
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Yes, the wages you receive in any particular week would be for the work /
number of hours you had done in the previous week.
Post by Evan
Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.
Your friends are wrong.
The friends are right in a way. Although you do get paid for the first week
of your work, you don't actually get paid in that week. So when you leave
the company, on your last day there will still be a week's pay due to you.

I know of one organisation that paid *two* weeks in arrears (and it may not
be unique).
M.I.5Ÿ
2006-12-19 09:28:37 UTC
Post by David
Post by "nightjar" .uk.com>
Post by Evan
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.
Anyone in the know?
As your friends suggest, it means that you would not be paid at the end of
your first week at work, but at the end of the second week and that money
would relate to your work in week one. When you leave, you would get paid
for your last week one week after you left.
It is a common system where hours are flexible, overtime is worked or there
are production bonuses. It gives the wages department time to work out the
amount to be paid, which may need to be advised to the bank up to three
working days in advance. For people who are paid a fixed salary, it is more
usual to pay at the end of the period worked, but, if the bulk of the
employees have variable payments, all may be paid one week in arrears.
Sometimes, only the variable elements of the wage are paid in arrears.
Colin Bignell
Colin is perfectly correct: this pay method is also known as 'a week
lying-on' - in days gone by, in the steel industry for example, payday
was always a Thursday but for hours worked and output produced over the
previous full, 7-day working week. So new starters had to work their
first week and to wait for their pay [all in cash, in a sealed envelope
- this took ages and a small army of pay clerks to make up, for
thousands of employees on hundreds of different pay/bonus systems]]
until the following Thursday but those who left employment on a Friday
still were paid the following Thursday in respect of their last full
pay week. No doubt it's still common pay practice where pay is weekly
and/or varies with overtime and/or production bonuses. Monthly-paid
workers can be on a similar regime - have known for example monthly pay
made mid-month in respect of the previous full calendar month.
My company has a rather odd-ball system. We are paid monthly in the middle
of the month (notionally the 15th). The pay covers the whole of the current
month (i.e. the half month before pay day and the half month after).
Steve Robinson
2006-12-19 13:26:02 UTC
Post by Evan
I would like to clarify what "wages paid one week in arrears" means.
It's one of the stipulations on my contract.
I take this to mean that I must work a full week (let's say Monday to
Friday) and payment for this is to follow at some point in the
immediately proceeding week.
Some of my friends have suggested in means working a week without pay
so that at the end of my employ there will be an extra week owing to
me.
Anyone in the know?
Yes it used to be called working a week in hand , as you have guessesd
you are always paid one week behind ,most companies operate this system
for weekly paid staff ,
Bob Wood
2006-12-21 11:33:17 UTC
Post by M.I.5Ÿ
My company has a rather odd-ball system. We are paid monthly in the
middle of the month (notionally the 15th). The pay covers the whole
of the current month (i.e. the half month before pay day and the half
month after).
I used to be paid on the 15th - and then the business was transferred
to soembody who paid on the last day of the month. Over six weeks
between pay days - not nice - thank goodness it only happened the
once!!
--
Bob
M.I.5Ÿ
2006-12-21 12:27:54 UTC
Post by M.I.5Ÿ
My company has a rather odd-ball system. We are paid monthly in the
middle of the month (notionally the 15th). The pay covers the whole
of the current month (i.e. the half month before pay day and the half
month after).
I used to be paid on the 15th - and then the business was transferred to
soembody who paid on the last day of the month. Over six weeks between
pay days - not nice - thank goodness it only happened the once!!
I trust you made sure that you got paid for the missing 2 weeks.