Discussion:
Why ban the eating of dog meat?
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Peter Percival
2018-08-07 08:50:17 UTC
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-08-07 08:58:13 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.

Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
abelard
2018-08-07 13:04:07 UTC
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On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
the bbc should support dog meat producers nd other workers...they
even have the example of o'barmy who recommends it...

trump is only allowing the law in the usa to annoy o'barmy
and his fascists but what does the snp have against
the american marxist?


"...I was introduced to dog meat (tough), snake meat (tougher), and
roasted grasshopper (crunchy). Like many Indonesians, Lolo followed a
brand of Islam that could make room for the more ancient animist and
Hindu faiths. He explained that a man took on the powers of whatever
he ate: One day soon, he promised, he would bring home a piece of
tiger meat for us to share..."
o'barmy in dreams of my father
--
www.abelard.org
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 15:31:56 UTC
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:-)




"abelard" <***@abelard.org> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
: <***@bungay.com> wrote:
:
: >On 7 Aug 2018, Peter Percival wrote
: >(in article <pkbmga$bhj$***@news.albasani.net>):
: >
: >> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >
: >The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not
PC.
: >
: >Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the 'celebrity'
: >chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
:
: the bbc should support dog meat producers nd other workers...they
: even have the example of o'barmy who recommends it...
:
: trump is only allowing the law in the usa to annoy o'barmy
: and his fascists but what does the snp have against
: the american marxist?
:
:
: "...I was introduced to dog meat (tough), snake meat (tougher), and
: roasted grasshopper (crunchy). Like many Indonesians, Lolo followed a
: brand of Islam that could make room for the more ancient animist and
: Hindu faiths. He explained that a man took on the powers of whatever
: he ate: One day soon, he promised, he would bring home a piece of
: tiger meat for us to share..."
: o'barmy in dreams of my father
:
: --
: www.abelard.org
Siri Cruise
2018-08-07 17:55:55 UTC
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Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
Thanks to things like mad cow disease, animals raised for meat are tracked and
inspected. To get dogs in the same regime would require segregating dogs for
food and dogs for pets. Pet dogs are exposed to all human diseases some residing
in dogs.
--
:-<> Siri Seal of Disavowal #000-001. Disavowed. Denied. Deleted. @
'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' /|\
An almond doesn't lactate. This post / \
Yet another supercilious snowflake for justice. insults Islam. Mohammed
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 20:09:24 UTC
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"Siri Cruise" <***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:chine.bleu-***@reader.eternal-september.org...
:> >> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: > >
: > >The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not
PC.
: > >
: > >Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
: > >chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
:
: Thanks to things like mad cow disease, animals raised for meat are tracked
and
: inspected. To get dogs in the same regime would require segregating dogs
for
: food and dogs for pets. Pet dogs are exposed to all human diseases some
residing
: in dogs.
:
: --
::-<> Siri Seal of Disavowal #000-001. Disavowed. Denied. Deleted. @
: 'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' /|\
: An almond doesn't lactate. This post / \
: Yet another supercilious snowflake for justice. insults Islam. Mohammed
Klaus Schadenfreude
2018-08-09 00:33:54 UTC
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Post by Siri Cruise
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
Thanks to things like mad cow disease, animals raised for meat are tracked and
inspected. To get dogs in the same regime would require segregating dogs for
food and dogs for pets. Pet dogs are exposed to all human diseases some residing
in dogs.
It's pretty damn racist to assume that Orientals don't have the same
safeguards.

Byker
2018-08-07 21:29:26 UTC
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On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
The Swiss have been eating dog meat for centuries:
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg



https://www.newsweek.com/not-just-christmas-swiss-urged-stop-eating-cats-and-dogs-287378

Dog meat was sold to Parisians as recently as 1910:
Loading Image...

China and South Korea may take heat for serving dog, but it's still legal to
eat dog meat in 43 states, and it does happen...
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 22:13:49 UTC
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Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It isn't
a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met through
business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine and, like the
languages, borrowed from neighbours.

*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK) could
learn a lot from them in other ways.

I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
de chucka
2018-08-07 22:30:24 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It isn't
a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met through
business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine and, like the
languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK) could
learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.

It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html

Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 23:11:58 UTC
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Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine and,
like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK) could
learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is something
in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)

There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of your
bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children to eat
their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only problem, the
fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate the crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
de chucka
2018-08-07 23:23:07 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine
and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK) could
learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is something
in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that folk
lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits and the
beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid and Willow bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of your
bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children to eat
their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only problem, the
fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate the crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 23:42:51 UTC
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Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine
and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK)
could learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is
something in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that folk
lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits and the
beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid  and Willow bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of
your bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children to
eat their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only
problem, the fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate the
crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Frogs legs (really).

I learned how to 'transform' a chicken from running around to oven
ready. A charming French lady who lives (or lived) in Kent on a small
holding used to run courses on rearing and killing chickens. Main aim
was for eggs but a few for the pot ;-)
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
de chucka
2018-08-08 00:04:20 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine
and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK)
could learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is
something in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that
folk lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits
and the beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid
and Willow bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of
your bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children
to eat their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only
problem, the fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate the
crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Frogs legs (really).
I learned how to 'transform' a chicken from running around to oven
ready. A charming French lady who lives (or lived) in Kent on a small
holding used to run courses on rearing and killing chickens. Main aim
was for eggs but a few for the pot ;-)
That what the chooks and ducks are for, egg production till they go in
the pot. The little bunnies running around the paddocks (damn those
Poms) are also candidates for the pot when I shoot straight but the
foxes aren't. Go figure, we all have our cultural biases although mine
tend to stay at home when I go O/S where I'll eat practically any local food
Brian Reay
2018-08-08 08:11:57 UTC
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Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine
and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK)
could learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is
something in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that
folk lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits
and the beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid
and Willow bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of
your bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children
to eat their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only
problem, the fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate
the crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Frogs legs (really).
I learned how to 'transform' a chicken from running around to oven
ready. A charming French lady who lives (or lived) in Kent on a small
holding used to run courses on rearing and killing chickens. Main aim
was for eggs but a few for the pot ;-)
That what the chooks and ducks are for, egg production till they go in
the pot.
Aren't they a bit tough by the time they are too old to lay? I suppose
ok for stew etc.

I prefer duck eggs to hens eggs but, as I'm sure you know, you need to
be more careful re collecting them to ensure they are fresh.
Post by de chucka
The little bunnies running around the paddocks (damn those
Poms) are also candidates for the pot when I shoot straight but the
foxes aren't.
Fox stew is supposedly eaten in southern France. Never tried it.


Go figure,  we all have our cultural biases although mine
Post by de chucka
tend to stay at home when I go O/S where I'll eat practically any local food
Sounds sensible.
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
Frank
2018-08-08 18:57:09 UTC
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Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine
and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK)
could learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is
something in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that
folk lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits
and the beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid
and Willow bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of
your bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children
to eat their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only
problem, the fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate
the crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Frogs legs (really).
I learned how to 'transform' a chicken from running around to oven
ready. A charming French lady who lives (or lived) in Kent on a small
holding used to run courses on rearing and killing chickens. Main aim
was for eggs but a few for the pot ;-)
That what the chooks and ducks are for, egg production till they go in
the pot. The little bunnies running around the paddocks (damn those
Poms) are also candidates for the pot when I shoot straight but the
foxes aren't. Go figure,  we all have our cultural biases although mine
tend to stay at home when I go O/S where I'll eat practically any local food
The most chickeny tasting chicken I recall was from a friend who raised
laying hens and ate them after they got too old. Chicken we buy in the
market is raised quickly for slaughter and are blander.
de chucka
2018-08-08 20:04:05 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I
met through business told me he thought they lacked their own
cuisine and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK)
could learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is
something in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that
folk lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits
and the beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid
and Willow bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of
your bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children
to eat their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only
problem, the fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate
the crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at
Filipino weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Frogs legs (really).
I learned how to 'transform' a chicken from running around to oven
ready. A charming French lady who lives (or lived) in Kent on a small
holding used to run courses on rearing and killing chickens. Main aim
was for eggs but a few for the pot ;-)
That what the chooks and ducks are for, egg production till they go in
the pot. The little bunnies running around the paddocks (damn those
Poms) are also candidates for the pot when I shoot straight but the
foxes aren't. Go figure,  we all have our cultural biases although
mine tend to stay at home when I go O/S where I'll eat practically any
local food
The most chickeny tasting chicken I recall was from a friend who raised
laying hens and ate them after they got too old.  Chicken we buy in the
market is raised quickly for slaughter and are blander.
Same with rabbit you get from the butcher, tasteless. Yep the old chooks
are a bit tough but full of flavour
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-08 09:38:01 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the ‘celebrity’
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine
and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK)
could learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is
something in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that folk
lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits and the
beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid  and Willow bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of
your bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children to
eat their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only
problem, the fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate the
crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Frogs legs (really).
I learned how to 'transform' a chicken from running around to oven
ready. A charming French lady who lives (or lived) in Kent on a small
holding used to run courses on rearing and killing chickens. Main aim
was for eggs but a few for the pot ;-)
You have to hatch out a few replacements. around half will be male and you only need one cockerel, so the rest end up as coq au vin.
Post by Brian Reay
--
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 11:46:47 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by de chucka
Post by Brian Reay
Post by abelard
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not PC.
Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the
'celebrity'
chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine
and, like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
*Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK)
could learn a lot from them in other ways.
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is
something in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
I agree with you but look at the strange and wonderful things that folk
lore says is beneficial. Of course quite a few do have benefits and the
beneficial component has been ID eg Aspirin/salicylic acid and Willow
bark
Post by Brian Reay
There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of
your bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children to
eat their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only
problem, the fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate the
crusts anyway.
Post by de chucka
It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
weddings where I've eaten it.
https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
You eat chickens? That's awful, what do they taste like - Bald Eagle?
Frogs legs (really).
I learned how to 'transform' a chicken from running around to oven
ready. A charming French lady who lives (or lived) in Kent on a small
holding used to run courses on rearing and killing chickens. Main aim
was for eggs but a few for the pot ;-)
You have to hatch out a few replacements. around half will be male and you
only need one cockerel, so the rest end up as coq au vin.
Post by Brian Reay
--
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 11:46:30 UTC
Reply
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"Brian Reay" <***@m.com> wrote in message news:pkd8vu$tiu$***@dont-email.me...
: On 07/08/2018 23:30, de chucka wrote:
: > On 8/08/2018 8:13 AM, Brian Reay wrote:
: >> On 07/08/2018 22:29, Byker wrote:
: >>> On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
: >>> <***@bungay.com> wrote:
: >>>
: >>>> On 7 Aug 2018, Peter Percival wrote
: >>>> (in article <pkbmga$bhj$***@news.albasani.net>):
: >>>>
: >>>>> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >>>>> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >>>>
: >>>> The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are
: >>>> not PC.
: >>>>
: >>>> Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the 'celebrity'
: >>>> chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
: >>>
: >>> The Swiss have been eating dog meat for centuries:
: >>> https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
: >>>
: >>
: >> I've visit Switzerland several times, most recently last year. It
: >> isn't a country I think of well in food terms*. Even a Swiss I met
: >> through business told me he thought they lacked their own cuisine and,
: >> like the languages, borrowed from neighbours.
: >>
: >> *Don't get me wrong, it is a lovely country etc and we (the UK) could
: >> learn a lot from them in other ways.
: >>
: >> I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
: >
: > Eating dog in Switzerland has a long history, considered good for
: > arthritis but it isn't commercially available afaik.
:
:
: It makes you wonder how these stories develop, unless there is something
: in dog meat which is good for arthritis ;-)
:
: There used to be a saying 'up north' that, if you ate the crusts of your
: bread, you'd get curly hair. It was used to encourage children to eat
: their crusts. We tried it with our three (all girls). Only problem, the
: fashion was for straight hair. Fortunately, they ate the crusts anyway.
:
: >
: > It's available widely in Asia and considered a delicacy at Filipino
: > weddings where I've eaten it.
: > https://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/00/rec0001.html
: >
: > Tastes like Koala without the eucalyptus after tasted ;-)
:
: ROTFL, at least you didn't say 'Tastes like chicken.'
:
:
:
: --
:
: Remarkable Coincidences:
: The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
: date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
: Company led to the Great Depression.
Byker
2018-08-08 18:38:28 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
https://www.quora.com/What-breed-of-dog-is-the-best-for-eating

The Korea Observer reports that many different pet breeds of dog are eaten
in South Korea, including labradors, retrievers and cocker spaniels, and
that the dogs slaughtered for their meat often include former pets:
http://www.koreaobserver.com/former-pets-slaughtered-for-dog-meat-across-korea-25566/
Post by Brian Reay
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same date in
October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust Company led to the
Great Depression.
October is traditionally a nervous time for investors:
https://www.investopedia.com/terms/o/octobereffect.asp
BeamMeUpScotty
2018-08-09 00:30:54 UTC
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Post by Byker
Post by Brian Reay
I'm now curious where they borrowed eating dogs from ;-)
https://www.quora.com/What-breed-of-dog-is-the-best-for-eating
The Korea Observer reports that many different pet breeds of dog are eaten
in South Korea, including labradors, retrievers and cocker spaniels, and
http://www.koreaobserver.com/former-pets-slaughtered-for-dog-meat-across-korea-25566/
A case where having Spot for a Bar-B-Q hits the spot.... ;)
--
That's Karma
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 11:45:44 UTC
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"Byker" <***@do~rag.net> wrote in message news:Qf6dnRay45iqkvfGnZ2dnUU7-***@supernews.com...
: On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 09:58:13 +0100, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
: <***@bungay.com> wrote:
:
: >On 7 Aug 2018, Peter Percival wrote
: >(in article <pkbmga$bhj$***@news.albasani.net>):
: >
: >> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >
: >The BBC would love the UK to ban all activities which they deem are not
PC.
: >
: >Dog meat pie sounds like it might be ok; maybe one of the 'celebrity'
: >chefs could cook one on BBC daytime tv?
:
: The Swiss have been eating dog meat for centuries:
: https://tinyurl.com/yc8mclgg
:
: http://youtu.be/DAIa55esiFw
:
:
https://www.newsweek.com/not-just-christmas-swiss-urged-stop-eating-cats-and-dogs-287378
:
: Dog meat was sold to Parisians as recently as 1910:
: http://www.occupyforanimals.net/uploads/7/7/3/5/7735203/4994377.jpg?458
:
: China and South Korea may take heat for serving dog, but it's still legal
to
: eat dog meat in 43 states, and it does happen...
:
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-07 09:42:47 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of anyone eating it in the UK.

Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.

OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 11:13:14 UTC
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So cause you have never heard of it, it does not happen...

kinda big headed of you.
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.

Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore (cats,
dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene reasons.
Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because historically the
meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.

OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-08-07 11:27:28 UTC
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Post by BurfordTJustice
So cause you have never heard of it, it does not happen...
kinda big headed of you.
Who knows what goes into the dishes at the local balti house?

As long as it tastes ok, bring it on I say.

...Is that next door’s cat I spy on my lawn? That’s lunch sorted.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 15:29:45 UTC
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"Fruitiest of Fruitcakes" <***@bungay.com> wrote in message news:***@news.giganews.com...
: On 7 Aug 2018, BurfordTJustice wrote
: (in article <pkbusi$fbb$***@dont-email.me>):
:
: > So cause you have never heard of it, it does not happen...
: >
: > kinda big headed of you.
:
: Who knows what goes into the dishes at the local balti house?
:
: As long as it tastes ok, bring it on I say.
:
: ...Is that next door's cat I spy on my lawn? That's lunch sorted.
:
p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
2018-08-07 17:30:33 UTC
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On Tue, 7 Aug 2018 07:13:14 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
Post by BurfordTJustice
So cause you have never heard of it, it does not happen...
kinda big headed of you.
What we should do is eat the fucking politicians who haven't got
anything better to do than waste public money looking for a solution to
a non existent problem. It must be silly season.

This can only run. Cats, special category for pet bunnies, retirement
homes for headless chickens, donkey sanctuaries given official embassy
status. About a billion should cover it.
Post by BurfordTJustice
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore (cats,
dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene reasons.
Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because historically the
meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
Sent from my iFurryUnderbelly.
--
p-0.0-h the cat

Internet Terrorist, Mass sock puppeteer, Agent provocateur, Gutter rat,
Devil incarnate, Linux user#666, BaStarD hacker, Resident evil, Monkey Boy,
Certifiable criminal, Spineless cowardly scum, textbook Psychopath,
the SCOURGE, l33t p00h d3 tr0ll, p00h == lam3r, p00h == tr0ll, troll infâme,
the OVERCAT [The BEARPAIR are dead, and we are its murderers], lowlife troll,
shyster [pending approval by STATE_TERROR], cripple, sociopath, kook,
smug prick, smartarse, arsehole, moron, idiot, imbecile, snittish scumbag,
liar, total ******* retard, shill, pooh-seur, scouringerer, jumped up chav,
punk ass dole whore troll, religious maniac, lycanthropic schizotypal lesbian,
the most complete ignoid, joker, and furball.

NewsGroups Numbrer One Terrorist

Honorary SHYSTER and FRAUD awarded for services to Haberdashery.
By Appointment to God Frank-Lin.

Signature integrity check
md5 Checksum: be0b2a8c486d83ce7db9a459b26c4896

I mark any message from »Q« the troll as stinky
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 11:45:51 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).

Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.

Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.

Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...

Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-08-07 12:14:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).
Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.
Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The first
time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it must
be venison or ostrich (not sure why).

It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven. I
wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4 hours
it gets, depending on the weight.

I’ve had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of my
favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and keep
it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in cider
cream sauce is lovely.
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 12:33:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).
Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.
Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The first
time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it must
be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
I can't see the similarity to venison or ostrich. Not had ostrich for
awhile, there was a period it was difficult to get hold of. I suspect
some TV chef promoted it and it became fashionable.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven. I
wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4 hours
it gets, depending on the weight.
I agree, very like lamb, although I've never cooked it.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
I’ve had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of my
favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and keep
it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in cider
cream sauce is lovely.
Pheasant is good, as is quail.

Duck is something of a family favourite- I cook it in a quince sauce.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-08-07 13:06:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).
Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.
Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The first
time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it must
be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
I can't see the similarity to venison or ostrich. Not had ostrich for
awhile, there was a period it was difficult to get hold of. I suspect
some TV chef promoted it and it became fashionable.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven. I
wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4 hours
it gets, depending on the weight.
I agree, very like lamb, although I've never cooked it.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
I’ve had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of my
favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and keep
it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in cider
cream sauce is lovely.
Pheasant is good, as is quail.
Duck is something of a family favourite- I cook it in a quince sauce.
I usually buy duck breast meat, slice it up and make duck chow mein. I am
trying to get as close to Chinese take-away as possible, and apparently chow
mein has few vegetables just spring onions, maybe a few chopped baby leeks
and lots of beansprouts to go with the noodles. I have been experimenting
with the mixture of soy sauce, oyster sauce, five spice and rice wine in
order to get an ‘authentic’ taste. I add a tiny bit of cornflour to this
in order to coat the ingredients rather than just sit as a watery sauce at
the bottom of the wok. My biggest problem is getting the groundnut oil really
hot without setting off the smoke alarm.
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 20:57:31 UTC
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Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).
Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.
Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The first
time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it must
be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
I can't see the similarity to venison or ostrich. Not had ostrich for
awhile, there was a period it was difficult to get hold of. I suspect
some TV chef promoted it and it became fashionable.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven. I
wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4 hours
it gets, depending on the weight.
I agree, very like lamb, although I've never cooked it.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
I’ve had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of my
favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and keep
it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in cider
cream sauce is lovely.
Pheasant is good, as is quail.
Duck is something of a family favourite- I cook it in a quince sauce.
I usually buy duck breast meat, slice it up and make duck chow mein. I am
trying to get as close to Chinese take-away as possible, and apparently chow
mein has few vegetables just spring onions, maybe a few chopped baby leeks
and lots of beansprouts to go with the noodles. I have been experimenting
with the mixture of soy sauce, oyster sauce, five spice and rice wine in
order to get an ‘authentic’ taste. I add a tiny bit of cornflour to this
in order to coat the ingredients rather than just sit as a watery sauce at
the bottom of the wok. My biggest problem is getting the groundnut oil really
hot without setting off the smoke alarm.
I do something similar with chicken or turkey but I've not tried it with
duck.

The problem with duck is the excess fat- the way I cook it, I get most
of it 'out'. I'd imagine that would be difficult the way you describe-
in fact it may by the duck fat setting off the alarm. Ground nut oil,
which you are using, also known as Peanut Oil, has quite a high smoke
point and is one recommended for Wok use. I've never seen a smoke point
for duck fat but it seems quite low. You could try Avocado Oil, if you
can get it. I've only seen it in a few places. It has a very high smoke
point.


Duck fat does seem to have a 'watery' part - I always make sure it is
separated off with the fat. It could be that which is causing your
problem. I'm not sure how you'd separate it off if the duck was sliced
up. I start it off, skin down, in a dry pan, spooning off the fat as it
cooks.
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 15:33:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Brian Reay" <***@m.com> wrote in message news:pkc3jc$cld$***@dont-email.me...
: On 07/08/2018 13:14, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes wrote:
: > On 7 Aug 2018, Brian Reay wrote
: > (in article <pkc0pg$qeb$***@dont-email.me>):
: >
: >> On 07/08/2018 10:42, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
: >>> On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 09:50:20 UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
: >>>> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >>>> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >>>
: >>> You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
: >>> anyone eating it in the UK.
: >>>
: >>> Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
: >>> (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
: >>> reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
: >>> historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
parasites.
: >>>
: >>> OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
European
: >>> countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
: >>
: >> We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
: >> nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my
view,
: >> but there isn't much meat on them).
: >>
: >> Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
: >>
: >> Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
: >> but only because I didn't care for it.
: >>
: >> Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
: >> consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
: >>
: >> Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
: >> lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
: >> rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
: >> didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
: >
: > I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
: > relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The
first
: > time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it
must
: > be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
:
: I can't see the similarity to venison or ostrich. Not had ostrich for
: awhile, there was a period it was difficult to get hold of. I suspect
: some TV chef promoted it and it became fashionable.
:
: >
: > It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven.
I
: > wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4
hours
: > it gets, depending on the weight.
: >
:
:
: I agree, very like lamb, although I've never cooked it.
:
:
: > I've had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
: > Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of
my
: > favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and
keep
: > it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in
cider
: > cream sauce is lovely.
:
: Pheasant is good, as is quail.
:
: Duck is something of a family favourite- I cook it in a quince sauce.
:
Incubus
2018-08-07 12:57:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).
Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.
Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The first
time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it must
be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
I had not previously taken you for an afficionado of Taliban food.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven. I
wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4 hours
it gets, depending on the weight.
One wrap for the shoulder of goat and one to wear atop your head. (I do but
jest.)
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
I’ve had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
I have heard a similar complaint. I stopped eating meat at the tender age of
eight and can thankfully little remember with full force of clarity the savour
of such fare. I leave such hideous repast to those with less delicate taste
buds and sensibilities than one such as I.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of my
favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and keep
it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in cider
cream sauce is lovely.
You sound like a pheasant plucker indeed.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 15:34:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Incubus" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message news:pkc4v1$jbg$***@dont-email.me...
: On 2018-08-07, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes <***@bungay.com> wrote:
: > On 7 Aug 2018, Brian Reay wrote
: > (in article <pkc0pg$qeb$***@dont-email.me>):
: >
: >> On 07/08/2018 10:42, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
: >> > On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 09:50:20 UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
: >> > > https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >> > > Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >> >
: >> > You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard
of
: >> > anyone eating it in the UK.
: >> >
: >> > Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
: >> > (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
: >> > reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
: >> > historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
parasites.
: >> >
: >> > OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
European
: >> > countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
: >>
: >> We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
: >> nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my
view,
: >> but there isn't much meat on them).
: >>
: >> Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
: >>
: >> Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
: >> but only because I didn't care for it.
: >>
: >> Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
: >> consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
: >>
: >> Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
: >> lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
: >> rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
: >> didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
: >
: > I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
: > relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The
first
: > time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it
must
: > be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
:
: I had not previously taken you for an afficionado of Taliban food.
:
: > It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven.
I
: > wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4
hours
: > it gets, depending on the weight.
:
: One wrap for the shoulder of goat and one to wear atop your head. (I do
but
: jest.)
:
: > I've had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
:
: I have heard a similar complaint. I stopped eating meat at the tender age
of
: eight and can thankfully little remember with full force of clarity the
savour
: of such fare. I leave such hideous repast to those with less delicate
taste
: buds and sensibilities than one such as I.
:
: > Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of
my
: > favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and
keep
: > it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in
cider
: > cream sauce is lovely.
:
: You sound like a pheasant plucker indeed.
Ophelia
2018-08-07 18:43:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).
Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.
Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The first
time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it must
be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
I had not previously taken you for an afficionado of Taliban food.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven. I
wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4 hours
it gets, depending on the weight.
One wrap for the shoulder of goat and one to wear atop your head. (I do but
jest.)
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
I’ve had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
I have heard a similar complaint. I stopped eating meat at the tender age
of
eight and can thankfully little remember with full force of clarity the
savour
of such fare. I leave such hideous repast to those with less delicate taste
buds and sensibilities than one such as I.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of my
favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and keep
it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in cider
cream sauce is lovely.
You sound like a pheasant plucker indeed.

==

lol We spend a lot of time on a farm in N.Yorks. Rabbits are a curse and
can destroy crops. D shoots them and I cook them for the dog, or D will eat
it occasionally:)
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 19:54:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Incubus
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European
countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
but there isn't much meat on them).
Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
but only because I didn't care for it.
Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The first
time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it must
be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
I had not previously taken you for an afficionado of Taliban food.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven. I
wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4 hours
it gets, depending on the weight.
One wrap for the shoulder of goat and one to wear atop your head.  (I do
but
jest.)
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
I’ve had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
I have heard a similar complaint.  I stopped eating meat at the tender age
of
eight and can thankfully little remember with full force of clarity the savour
of such fare.  I leave such hideous repast to those with less delicate
taste
buds and sensibilities than one such as I.
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one of my
favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and keep
it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in cider
cream sauce is lovely.
You sound like a pheasant plucker indeed.
==
lol We spend a lot of time on a farm in N.Yorks.  Rabbits are a curse and
can destroy crops.  D shoots them and I cook them for the dog, or D will
eat
it occasionally:)
Wild rabbit is supposed to be superior to farmed rabbit but only
definitely having tried the former a few times (I suspect other times
I've eaten rabbit it was farmed), I can't claim to have noticed a
difference- other than size.

While not advocating eating dogs, I'm sure there would be a huge fuss
were it to be allowed. No doubt including some, so called, animal lovers
with convictions for neglecting their pets etc.
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 20:10:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
You can already get dog to eat in the UK if you know where to ask for it.





"Brian Reay" <***@m.com> wrote in message news:pkcteb$p0c$***@dont-email.me...
: On 07/08/2018 19:43, Ophelia wrote:
: >
: >
: > "Incubus" wrote in message news:pkc4v1$jbg$***@dont-email.me...
: >
: > On 2018-08-07, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes <***@bungay.com> wrote:
: >> On 7 Aug 2018, Brian Reay wrote
: >> (in article <pkc0pg$qeb$***@dont-email.me>):
: >>
: >>> On 07/08/2018 10:42, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
: >>> > On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 09:50:20 UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
: >>> > > https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >>> > > Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other
animals?
: >>> >
: >>> > You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard
of
: >>> > anyone eating it in the UK.
: >>> >
: >>> > Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land
carnivore
: >>> > (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
: >>> > reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
: >>> > historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
: >>> > parasites.
: >>> >
: >>> > OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
: >>> > European
: >>> > countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
: >>>
: >>> We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but,
while
: >>> nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my
view,
: >>> but there isn't much meat on them).
: >>>
: >>> Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
: >>>
: >>> Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
: >>> but only because I didn't care for it.
: >>>
: >>> Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
: >>> consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
: >>>
: >>> Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
: >>> lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
: >>> rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
: >>> didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
: >>
: >> I buy a shoulder of goat on a regular basis, and cook it when we have
: >> relatives for dinner. They all like it, even the grandchildren. The
first
: >> time I cooked it I asked them to identify the meat, but most decided it
: >> must
: >> be venison or ostrich (not sure why).
: >
: > I had not previously taken you for an afficionado of Taliban food.
: >
: >> It is like lamb, although has to be cooked for longer on a slower oven.
I
: >> wrap the shoulder in foil and that seems to keep it moist for the 3-4
: >> hours
: >> it gets, depending on the weight.
: >
: > One wrap for the shoulder of goat and one to wear atop your head. (I do
: > but
: > jest.)
: >
: >> I've had rabbit a few times but I have never found it to taste of much.
: >
: > I have heard a similar complaint. I stopped eating meat at the tender
age
: > of
: > eight and can thankfully little remember with full force of clarity the
: > savour
: > of such fare. I leave such hideous repast to those with less delicate
: > taste
: > buds and sensibilities than one such as I.
: >
: >> Pigeon was ok, but so small it was a faff to prepare. Pheasant is one
of
: >> my
: >> favourites, but the wife is not keen, so I tend to buy a frozen one and
: >> keep
: >> it for when she has gone to her sisters for a few days. Pheasant in
cider
: >> cream sauce is lovely.
: >
: > You sound like a pheasant plucker indeed.
: >
: > ==
: >
: > lol We spend a lot of time on a farm in N.Yorks. Rabbits are a curse and
: > can destroy crops. D shoots them and I cook them for the dog, or D will
: > eat
: > it occasionally:)
: >
:
:
: Wild rabbit is supposed to be superior to farmed rabbit but only
: definitely having tried the former a few times (I suspect other times
: I've eaten rabbit it was farmed), I can't claim to have noticed a
: difference- other than size.
:
: While not advocating eating dogs, I'm sure there would be a huge fuss
: were it to be allowed. No doubt including some, so called, animal lovers
: with convictions for neglecting their pets etc.
:
:
: --
:
: Remarkable Coincidences:
: The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
: date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
: Company led to the Great Depression.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-08 09:40:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
SNIP
Post by Brian Reay
Wild rabbit is supposed to be superior to farmed rabbit but only
definitely having tried the former a few times (I suspect other times
I've eaten rabbit it was farmed), I can't claim to have noticed a
difference- other than size.
Wild rabbit has a slightly gamy flavour, whereas farmed rabbit is rather bland - like turkey breast.
Post by Brian Reay
While not advocating eating dogs, I'm sure there would be a huge fuss
were it to be allowed. No doubt including some, so called, animal lovers
with convictions for neglecting their pets etc.
--
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 11:47:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
SNIP
Post by Brian Reay
Wild rabbit is supposed to be superior to farmed rabbit but only
definitely having tried the former a few times (I suspect other times
I've eaten rabbit it was farmed), I can't claim to have noticed a
difference- other than size.
Wild rabbit has a slightly gamy flavour, whereas farmed rabbit is rather
bland - like turkey breast.
Post by Brian Reay
While not advocating eating dogs, I'm sure there would be a huge fuss
were it to be allowed. No doubt including some, so called, animal lovers
with convictions for neglecting their pets etc.
--
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 15:32:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Brian Reay" <***@m.com> wrote in message news:pkc0pg$qeb$***@dont-email.me...
: On 07/08/2018 10:42, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
: > On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 09:50:20 UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
: >> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >
: > You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
: >
: > Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
: >
: > OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
: >
:
:
:
: We (in the UK) 'turn our noses up' at things like frogs legs but, while
: nothing special, they aren't bad (they do taste like chicken in my view,
: but there isn't much meat on them).
:
: Some people won't eat rabbit, another rather tasty meat. Ditto pigeon.
:
: Horse is nothing special, a bit strong tasting. I'd not pick it again
: but only because I didn't care for it.
:
: Equally, there are things people eat in the UK that others wouldn't
: consider- tripe, jellied eels, ...
:
: Goat is something I've never seen here but is rather good, not unlike
: lamb. (I tried it in Pakistan.) Sheep's brain makes a pate which I
: rather enjoyed, until I was told how it was prepared- the ingredients
: didn't bother me. That was in Jordon.
Jethro_uk
2018-08-07 16:12:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
parasites.
The closer an animal is to human, genetically, the better it is to avoid
it.

Islamic countries seem to have a much lower prevalence of Multiple
Sclerosis ... suggesting there could be a hidden viral dimension ....
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 20:11:08 UTC
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"Jethro_uk" <***@hotmailbin.com> wrote in message news:pkcge1$hfd$***@dont-email.me...
: On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 02:42:47 -0700, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
:
: > Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
: > (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
: > reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
: > historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
: > parasites.
:
: The closer an animal is to human, genetically, the better it is to avoid
: it.
:
: Islamic countries seem to have a much lower prevalence of Multiple
: Sclerosis ... suggesting there could be a hidden viral dimension ....
A. Filip
2018-08-07 21:15:39 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
Is Switzerland a non western country ]A]?

[A] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2255684/Farmers-Switzerland-routinely-EATING-cats-dogs-meals.html
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Farmers in Switzerland routinely EATING cats and dogs with their meals
* Practice still common among farmers in areas of Switzerland
* The most popular type of dog is a breed related to the Rotweiler
* Commercial sale of dog meat is banned in the country, eating is not
By Allan Hall for MailOnline
Published: 18:00 BST, 1 January 2013 | Updated: 10:22 BST, 18 March 2013
--
A. Filip
| Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited
| love. (Charlie Brown)
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 11:47:56 UTC
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"A. Filip" <***@wp.eu> wrote in message news:anfi+77aq9rlcwf-***@wp.eu...
: "R. Mark Clayton" <***@gmail.com> wrote:
: > On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 09:50:20 UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
: >> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >
: > You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
: >
: > Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
: > (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
: > reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
: > historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
: > parasites.
: >
: > OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
: > European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
:
: Is Switzerland a non western country ]A]?
:
: [A]
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2255684/Farmers-Switzerland-routinely-EATING-cats-dogs-meals.html
: > Farmers in Switzerland routinely EATING cats and dogs with their meals
: > * Practice still common among farmers in areas of Switzerland
: > * The most popular type of dog is a breed related to the Rotweiler
: > * Commercial sale of dog meat is banned in the country, eating is not
: > By Allan Hall for MailOnline
: > Published: 18:00 BST, 1 January 2013 | Updated: 10:22 BST, 18 March 2013
:
: --
: A. Filip
: | Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited
: | love. (Charlie Brown)
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 22:04:07 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore (cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
I wonder how many people ate it unknowingly due to the 'horse meat scandal'?

Obviously, I'm not condoning what went on, far from it, but I don't
recall any suggestion that anyone ever commented on / complained about
the taste or even quality. Nor there being any suggestion the meat
wasn't safe.

Obviously it was passed off as something else, which is wrong, and a
good enough reason for those involved to be punished etc.

However, if someone were to say : "People ate it before with no
problems." as part of a case to sell it here, can you imagine the
reaction ;-)

I was watching one of Hugh Fernly W programmes some time back- he was
preparing some dishes based on offal. At one time, not so long ago, such
food would have been perfectly normal. Some people won't even eat liver
or kidneys. Imagine serving, say, a stuffed heart for dinner tomorrow ;-)
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
Peter Percival
2018-08-07 22:31:35 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons.  Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
I wonder how many people ate it unknowingly due to the 'horse meat scandal'?
Obviously, I'm not condoning what went on, far from it, but I don't
recall any suggestion that anyone ever commented on / complained about
the taste or even quality. Nor there being any suggestion the meat
wasn't safe.
Obviously it was passed off as something else, which is wrong, and a
good enough reason for those involved to be punished etc.
However, if someone were to say : "People ate it before with no
problems."  as part of a case to sell it here, can you imagine the
reaction ;-)
I was watching one of Hugh Fernly W programmes some time back- he was
preparing some dishes based on offal. At one time, not so long ago, such
food would have been perfectly normal. Some people won't even eat liver
or kidneys.  Imagine serving, say, a stuffed heart for dinner tomorrow ;-)
I often have stuffed lamb's hearts.
Brian Reay
2018-08-07 23:02:44 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Brian Reay
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Peter Percival
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard
of anyone eating it in the UK.
Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons.  Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and
parasites.
OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
I wonder how many people ate it unknowingly due to the 'horse meat scandal'?
Obviously, I'm not condoning what went on, far from it, but I don't
recall any suggestion that anyone ever commented on / complained about
the taste or even quality. Nor there being any suggestion the meat
wasn't safe.
Obviously it was passed off as something else, which is wrong, and a
good enough reason for those involved to be punished etc.
However, if someone were to say : "People ate it before with no
problems."  as part of a case to sell it here, can you imagine the
reaction ;-)
I was watching one of Hugh Fernly W programmes some time back- he was
preparing some dishes based on offal. At one time, not so long ago,
such food would have been perfectly normal. Some people won't even eat
liver or kidneys.  Imagine serving, say, a stuffed heart for dinner
tomorrow ;-)
I often have stuffed lamb's hearts.
I'm surprised you can find them. We use a good, traditional, butcher for
special meat and, as good as they are, I'd be surprised if they had them.

I suggested we try them (me cooking) but the 'over the glasses' look
told me it wasn't one of my better ideas ;-) I think I did duck in
quince sauce instead.
--
Remarkable Coincidences:
The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
Company led to the Great Depression.
Norman Wells
2018-08-08 07:26:20 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by Peter Percival
I often have stuffed lamb's hearts.
I'm surprised you can find them. We use a good, traditional, butcher for
special meat and, as good as they are, I'd be surprised if they had them.
I suggested we try them (me cooking) but the 'over the glasses' look
told me it wasn't one of my better ideas ;-) I think I did duck in
quince sauce instead.
The next time, you might have have to do duck under the blows.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 11:48:19 UTC
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"Brian Reay" <***@m.com> wrote in message news:pkd50n$8qh$***@dont-email.me...
: On 07/08/2018 10:42, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
: > On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 09:50:20 UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
: >> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: >> Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
: >
: > You are not allowed to buy or sell dog meat, and I have never heard of
anyone eating it in the UK.
: >
: > Generally speaking "western" culture abhors eating any land carnivore
(cats, dogs, bears etc.), but not in the east, for very good hygiene
reasons. Similarly many people refuse to eat [unclean] pork, because
historically the meat was often riddled with harmful bacteria and parasites.
: >
: > OTOH horse meat is also taboo in the UK, but not France and other
European countries, but that is sentiment rather than common sense.
: >
:
: I wonder how many people ate it unknowingly due to the 'horse meat
scandal'?
:
: Obviously, I'm not condoning what went on, far from it, but I don't
: recall any suggestion that anyone ever commented on / complained about
: the taste or even quality. Nor there being any suggestion the meat
: wasn't safe.
:
: Obviously it was passed off as something else, which is wrong, and a
: good enough reason for those involved to be punished etc.
:
: However, if someone were to say : "People ate it before with no
: problems." as part of a case to sell it here, can you imagine the
: reaction ;-)
:
: I was watching one of Hugh Fernly W programmes some time back- he was
: preparing some dishes based on offal. At one time, not so long ago, such
: food would have been perfectly normal. Some people won't even eat liver
: or kidneys. Imagine serving, say, a stuffed heart for dinner tomorrow ;-)
:
: --
:
: Remarkable Coincidences:
: The Stock Market Crashes of 1929 and 2008 happened on the same
: date in October. In Oct 1907, a run on the Knickerbocker Trust
: Company led to the Great Depression.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-07 11:13:22 UTC
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"Peter Percival" <***@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:pkbmga$bhj$***@news.albasani.net...
: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45085514
: Why not just control the slaughter and so on as with other animals?
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