Discussion:
Quick easy free trade deal with USA - no punitive tariffs!
(too old to reply)
R. Mark Clayton
2017-09-27 09:42:31 UTC
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A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when Trump announced: -

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/

ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...

the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does another the next so now we have: -

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html

so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands of British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...


What other tariffs might be imposed?
Dairy products 35.4%
Sugars and confectionery 23.6%
Beverages and tobacco 19.6%
Animal products 15.7%
Cereals and preparations 12.8%
Fish and fish products 12.0%
Fruit, vegetables and plants 10.5%
Textiles 6.5%
Coffee, tea 6.1%



Oops - sorry those would be the tariffs into Europe if we leave the customs union...
James Harris
2017-09-27 13:15:42 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does another the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands of British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
AIUI that's a punishment for a trade unfairness, and it's presence was
as a result of a decision by a quasi-judicial body, not by POTUS. If
it's fair and legal then there's no point the British side jumping up
and down complaining. The Brits would not, in that case, be the injured
party.

If it's wrong, on the other hand, then it needs to be corrected.
--
James Harris
pensive hamster
2017-09-27 15:15:43 UTC
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Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does another the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands of British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
AIUI that's a punishment for a trade unfairness, and it's presence was
as a result of a decision by a quasi-judicial body, not by POTUS. If
it's fair and legal then there's no point the British side jumping up
and down complaining. The Brits would not, in that case, be the injured
party.
If it's wrong, on the other hand, then it needs to be corrected.
According to:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-41407994
26 September 2017

... While it is true that Bombardier has received billions from the
government of Quebec and the state's pension fund, Boeing has
received more, a lot more, from the US military, Nasa and the
State of Washington over many decades.

Boeing would argue these were commercial arrangements, others
would call them padded contracts amounting to subsidies.

It is widely acknowledged that Boeing's arch rival Airbus would not
exist were it not for huge subsidies from European governments
- but is also widely acknowledged by customers that the competition
between the two has driven competitiveness and innovation.

That is why Bombardier's claim that Boeing is trying to strangle a
new competitor at birth has received widespread sympathy in the
financial press.

The Economist - that bastion of free market principles - called
Boeing's case against Bombardier "a flight of hypocrisy".
Altroy1
2017-09-27 18:19:15 UTC
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[...]
Post by pensive hamster
That is why Bombardier's claim that Boeing is trying to strangle a
new competitor at birth has received widespread sympathy in the
financial press.
The Economist - that bastion of free market principles - called
Boeing's case against Bombardier "a flight of hypocrisy".
Apparently Boeing did not even bid for the specific Delta contract, it simply
objected to a rival getting help as it would see it from Government.
tim...
2017-09-27 18:21:58 UTC
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Post by Altroy1
[...]
That is why Bombardier's claim that Boeing is trying to strangle a new
competitor at birth has received widespread sympathy in the financial
press.
The Economist - that bastion of free market principles - called Boeing's
case against Bombardier "a flight of hypocrisy".
Apparently Boeing did not even bid for the specific Delta contract,
It was said today that they don't even make a plane that competes in the
sector

I'm not an expert in this, but I suspect that if Bombardier do ultimately
lose this battle, then the only winner will be Embraer.

tim
R. Mark Clayton
2017-09-27 17:20:14 UTC
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Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does another the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands of British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
AIUI that's a punishment for a trade unfairness, and it's presence was
as a result of a decision by a quasi-judicial body, not by POTUS. If
it's fair and legal then there's no point the British side jumping up
and down complaining. The Brits would not, in that case, be the injured
party.
If it's wrong, on the other hand, then it needs to be corrected.
--
James Harris
Bombardier has been bailed out and arguably subsidised.

The point was about the *****cks Brexiteers have spouted about easy trade deals when the reality is damage like this.
tim...
2017-09-27 18:22:25 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when
Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does another
the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands of
British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
AIUI that's a punishment for a trade unfairness, and it's presence was
as a result of a decision by a quasi-judicial body, not by POTUS. If
it's fair and legal then there's no point the British side jumping up
and down complaining. The Brits would not, in that case, be the injured
party.
If it's wrong, on the other hand, then it needs to be corrected.
--
James Harris
Bombardier has been bailed out and arguably subsidised.
The point was about the *****cks Brexiteers have spouted about easy trade
deals when the reality is damage like this.
but there really is no connection

tim
James Harris
2017-09-27 19:07:49 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when
Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does another
the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands of
British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
AIUI that's a punishment for a trade unfairness, and it's presence was
as a result of a decision by a quasi-judicial body, not by POTUS. If
it's fair and legal then there's no point the British side jumping up
and down complaining. The Brits would not, in that case, be the injured
party.
If it's wrong, on the other hand, then it needs to be corrected.
--
James Harris
Bombardier has been bailed out and arguably subsidised.
The point was about the *****cks Brexiteers have spouted about easy trade
deals when the reality is damage like this.
but there really is no connection
Agreed. Unless Mark is talking about souring the relationship between
potential partners I can't see a connection between a trade dispute and
a new FTA. The two things are entirely separate, I would have thought.
--
James Harris
MM
2017-09-28 10:07:17 UTC
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Post by tim...
but there really is no connection
Except that everyone, especially workers possibly about to lose their
jobs, can see now how ruinous tariffs can be, irrespective of what
caused them.

MM

---
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Altroy1
2017-09-27 18:15:52 UTC
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Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does
another the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands
of British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
AIUI that's a punishment for a trade unfairness, and it's presence was
as a result of a decision by a quasi-judicial body, not by POTUS. If
it's fair and legal then there's no point the British side jumping up
and down complaining. The Brits would not, in that case, be the injured
party.
I see. If the EU proscribes a subsidy to a British business, in the Brexit
psyche that is a vicious and unwarranted interference from Brussels with "our
right to make our own laws". So what are we waiting for? Sign that petition!
Let's get out of the EU right now.

But America? Deep in the Brexit mind is the belief in the essential goodness and
truthiness of the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave. Obviously, then,
Bomardier receieved a wicked subsidy, and the Land of the Free's "independent"
Dept of Commerce regulator had no choice but to step in to deal with such badness.

When negotiating a free trade deal, would the Home of the Brave's negotiators
ever insist on any dispensing of some nasty regulation banning chlorinated
chicken or require Brexit Britain to refrain from "unfair" subsidies to it's
industries? Oh come on. Is the Pope a Catholic? Of course not!
Post by James Harris
If it's wrong, on the other hand, then it needs to be corrected.
James Harris
2017-09-27 19:11:08 UTC
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Post by Altroy1
Post by James Harris
Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does
another the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands
of British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
AIUI that's a punishment for a trade unfairness, and it's presence was
as a result of a decision by a quasi-judicial body, not by POTUS. If
it's fair and legal then there's no point the British side jumping up
and down complaining. The Brits would not, in that case, be the injured
party.
I see. If the EU proscribes a subsidy to a British business, in the Brexit
psyche that is a vicious and unwarranted interference from Brussels with "our
right to make our own laws". So what are we waiting for? Sign that petition!
Let's get out of the EU right now.
But America? Deep in the Brexit mind is the belief in the essential goodness and
truthiness of the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave. Obviously, then,
Bomardier receieved a wicked subsidy, and the Land of the Free's "independent"
Dept of Commerce regulator had no choice but to step in to deal with such badness.
No. This is nothing to do with Brexit or a Brexit psyche. Transatlantic
trade - even under WTO terms - has to conform to agreed standards of
fair competition. If one side is acting unfairly then it needs to
correct that unfairness. Or, if it is acting fairly, then the complaint
of one side needs to be thrown out via arbitration.
Post by Altroy1
When negotiating a free trade deal, would the Home of the Brave's negotiators
ever insist on any dispensing of some nasty regulation banning chlorinated
chicken or require Brexit Britain to refrain from "unfair" subsidies to it's
industries? Oh come on. Is the Pope a Catholic? Of course not!
Those are things for the negotiators to define (not the pope bit; we'll
take that as a given).
--
James Harris
Altroy1
2017-09-28 14:19:15 UTC
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[....]
Post by James Harris
Post by Altroy1
But America? Deep in the Brexit mind is the belief in the essential goodness and
truthiness of the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave. Obviously, then,
Bomardier receieved a wicked subsidy, and the Land of the Free's "independent"
Dept of Commerce regulator had no choice but to step in to deal with such badness.
No. This is nothing to do with Brexit or a Brexit psyche.
You may be right in terms of the motive of Boeing. The Brexit psyche may not
have been uppermost in their minds more likely they are supporting the America
First strategy. Bombardier and other foreign firms can sod off and get lost.

In the terms of this newsgroup and thread, though, discussion relating to the
Brexit promise of out of the EU's hateful shackles and into the arms of a
wonderful new "the world's our [219% import tariff] oyster" free trade deal with
the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave is relevant.


http://www.macleans.ca/economy/bombardier-gets-a-taste-of-america-first-what-comes-next-2/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4927656/Britain-America-brink-trade-war.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4927714/Why-Trump-let-Britain-down.html

http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/27/news/economy/us-canada-trade-war-bombardier/index.html
Post by James Harris
Transatlantic
trade - even under WTO terms - has to conform to agreed standards of
fair competition. If one side is acting unfairly then it needs to
correct that unfairness. Or, if it is acting fairly, then the complaint
of one side needs to be thrown out via arbitration.
You have perhaps inadvertently, hopefully not, just summarised how the EU
impinges on the sovereignty of the UK and it's other member states for that
matter. Trading between states needs to be conducted on a level playing field.
That is why "race to the bottom cheap food" farmers in one EU state cannot crowd
their chickens close in battery cages then chlorinate over the inevitable
problems. That they cannot do this is a restriction on their ability to quote
"make our own laws".
Post by James Harris
Post by Altroy1
When negotiating a free trade deal, would the Home of the Brave's negotiators
ever insist on any dispensing of some nasty regulation banning chlorinated
chicken or require Brexit Britain to refrain from "unfair" subsidies to it's
industries? Oh come on. Is the Pope a Catholic? Of course not!
Those are things for the negotiators to define (not the pope bit; we'll
take that as a given).
James Harris
2017-09-28 13:47:30 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Altroy1
[....]
Post by James Harris
Post by Altroy1
But America? Deep in the Brexit mind is the belief in the essential goodness and
truthiness of the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave. Obviously, then,
Bomardier receieved a wicked subsidy, and the Land of the Free's "independent"
Dept of Commerce regulator had no choice but to step in to deal with such badness.
No. This is nothing to do with Brexit or a Brexit psyche.
You may be right in terms of the motive of Boeing.
Indeed. That's all I was talking about in this thread.

...
Post by Altroy1
In the terms of this newsgroup and thread, though, discussion relating to the
Brexit promise of out of the EU's hateful shackles and into the arms of a
wonderful new "the world's our [219% import tariff] oyster" free trade deal with
the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave is relevant.
There are other threads for that but as you want to discuss it here I
don't mind.

I agree with the "coming out of the EU's shackles" part - just as I
would argue for getting out of bonds which already restricted my freedom
to move and which were steadily getting tighter. But I don't agree with
the idea of the UK going into the arms of a wonderful new world. What we
as a nation have chosen to do is achieve freedom and then shape our
place in the world. And some of that will, I hope, include influencing
the world we want to live in. It is not sitting waiting for us. We need
to make it. Brexit allows us to do that.
Post by Altroy1
http://www.macleans.ca/economy/bombardier-gets-a-taste-of-america-first-what-comes-next-2/
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4927656/Britain-America-brink-trade-war.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4927714/Why-Trump-let-Britain-down.html
http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/27/news/economy/us-canada-trade-war-bombardier/index.html
Post by James Harris
Transatlantic
trade - even under WTO terms - has to conform to agreed standards of
fair competition. If one side is acting unfairly then it needs to
correct that unfairness. Or, if it is acting fairly, then the complaint
of one side needs to be thrown out via arbitration.
You have perhaps inadvertently, hopefully not, just summarised how the EU
impinges on the sovereignty of the UK and it's other member states for that
matter.
Not so. There is a big difference. The EU is not a bilateral agreement
such as exists between trading nations and which suits both sides until
changed by mutual agreement. The EU's lawmaking is not static. New EU
laws, directives and edicts are formed all the time. And they are formed
unilaterally by the EU. While we have input we must eventually accept
that we, in our subordinate role, have no choice but to accept the
choices made on our behalf.

And this is not static. Over the years and decades, the EU has involved
itself in more and more aspects of our lives. It has steadily acquired
more powers and as far as I know has NEVER given any powers back.

So the EU's rules are not at all like a bilateral treaty.
Post by Altroy1
Trading between states needs to be conducted on a level playing field.
That is why "race to the bottom cheap food" farmers in one EU state cannot crowd
their chickens close in battery cages then chlorinate over the inevitable
problems. That they cannot do this is a restriction on their ability to quote
"make our own laws".
From what I've heard the UK under the current government will make
better decisions and fairer, more humane laws than the EU does so your
fears are unfounded.
--
James Harris
R. Mark Clayton
2017-09-28 13:57:10 UTC
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Post by James Harris
Post by Altroy1
[....]
SNIP
Post by James Harris
Post by Altroy1
You have perhaps inadvertently, hopefully not, just summarised how the EU
impinges on the sovereignty of the UK and it's other member states for that
matter.
Not so. There is a big difference. The EU is not a bilateral agreement
such as exists between trading nations and which suits both sides until
changed by mutual agreement. The EU's lawmaking is not static. New EU
laws, directives and edicts are formed all the time. And they are formed
unilaterally by the EU. While we have input we must eventually accept
that we, in our subordinate role, have no choice but to accept the
choices made on our behalf.
Treu, but there is another big difference - we have Members of the European Parliament, we do not have any representatives in the US Congress.
Post by James Harris
And this is not static. Over the years and decades, the EU has involved
itself in more and more aspects of our lives. It has steadily acquired
more powers and as far as I know has NEVER given any powers back.
So the EU's rules are not at all like a bilateral treaty.
Post by Altroy1
Trading between states needs to be conducted on a level playing field.
That is why "race to the bottom cheap food" farmers in one EU state cannot crowd
their chickens close in battery cages then chlorinate over the inevitable
problems. That they cannot do this is a restriction on their ability to quote
"make our own laws".
From what I've heard the UK under the current government will make
better decisions and fairer, more humane laws than the EU does so your
fears are unfounded.
dream on.
Post by James Harris
--
James Harris
tim...
2017-09-27 18:18:23 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
A few weeks ago there was one of these jolly Brexit bean feasts when Trump announced: -
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/09/trump-has-confirmed-britain-will-get-free-trade-deal-west-will/
ha they said the rest of the world will be queuing up to trade with us...
the trouble with Trump is he says one thing one minute and does another
the next so now we have: -
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/bombardier-ruling-risks-thousands-belfast-231200569.html
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/uk-world/bombardier-job-fears-over-crippling-us-tariff-of-21963-in-boeing-row-36172924.html
so the reality [if WTO don't intervene] is 220% tariff and thousands of
British aircraft workers queuing up for the dole...
Anti dumpling rules apply trade deal or not

the issue here is whether the US can substantiate its claim of dumping at a
disinterested tribunal

getting a tribunal formed of members of the interested country to agree, is
not a surprise

That the US is strong on anti-dumping does not mean that it is a bad country
to make a deal with.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
What other tariffs might be imposed?
the same a set of external tariffs that the US already "imposes" on us

we have to pay them as member of the EU, we will have to pay exactly the
same ones once outside the EU.

they cannot discriminate, they cannot make them higher for us outside of the
EU than they are now

Of course, if we negotiate a trade deal we can negotiate them down, in
return for whatever the US wants from us.

(just as the EU could negotiate them down in their trade deal, but that
seems to have floundered)
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Dairy products 35.4%
Sugars and confectionery 23.6%
Beverages and tobacco 19.6%
Animal products 15.7%
Cereals and preparations 12.8%
Fish and fish products 12.0%
Fruit, vegetables and plants 10.5%
Textiles 6.5%
Coffee, tea 6.1%
Oops - sorry those would be the tariffs into Europe if we leave the customs union...
why should we be worried about that list

we are not self sufficient in food.

Our agricultural exports are a minimal amount of our GDP (the largest single
item of agriculture exports is Scotch whiskey at 30% of the total!)

Our textile industry was decimated by the far east 2 decades ago

last time I looked we didn't actually grow tea or coffee in the UK

tim
pensive hamster
2017-09-27 19:05:43 UTC
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On Wednesday, 27 September 2017 19:19:21 UTC+1, tim... wrote:
[...]
Post by tim...
last time I looked we didn't actually grow tea or coffee in the UK
At the risk of wandering slightly off-topic:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/17/storm-in-a-teacup-as-gardeners-realise-uk-climate-is-perfect-for/
17 May 2016

Tea lovers are no longer relying on China for supplies and are
increasingly opting to grow plants in their own back gardens as
they realise the British climate is perfect for it, experts have said.

With the "grow your own" movement still in full swing, sales of
Camellia sinensis - the common tea plant - are rocketing as
gardeners realise it thrives in the UK's climate.

Contrary to popular belief, tea plants don't require heat and
humidity to grow, rather preferring temperate regions with
plenty of moisture.

The UK already boasts two tea plantations - one in Cornwall,
which is experiencing its biggest ever yield due to a warm winter,
and the other in the Scottish Highlands - with a third planned for
Northern Ireland.
------------------------------------------

https://tregothnan.co.uk/

Buy British Tea - our silken pyramid bags contain our luxury
loose tea for the most perfectly brewed cup of English tea.

------------------------------------------

British Tea for British Workers, I say!
James Harris
2017-09-27 19:19:11 UTC
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Post by pensive hamster
[...]
Post by tim...
last time I looked we didn't actually grow tea or coffee in the UK
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/17/storm-in-a-teacup-as-gardeners-realise-uk-climate-is-perfect-for/
17 May 2016
Tea lovers are no longer relying on China
I don't know about the reputed sources of China and India but according
to a TV programme I saw recently much of our tea comes from African
countries such as Kenya.
Post by pensive hamster
for supplies and are
increasingly opting to grow plants in their own back gardens as
they realise the British climate is perfect for it, experts have said.
With the "grow your own" movement still in full swing, sales of
Camellia sinensis - the common tea plant - are rocketing as
gardeners realise it thrives in the UK's climate.
Well, that _is_ a surprise!
Post by pensive hamster
Contrary to popular belief, tea plants don't require heat and
humidity to grow, rather preferring temperate regions with
plenty of moisture.
The UK already boasts two tea plantations - one in Cornwall,
which is experiencing its biggest ever yield due to a warm winter,
and the other in the Scottish Highlands - with a third planned for
Northern Ireland.
------------------------------------------
https://tregothnan.co.uk/
Buy British Tea - our silken pyramid bags contain our luxury
loose tea for the most perfectly brewed cup of English tea.
------------------------------------------
British Tea for British Workers, I say!
Indeed - we could grow it here all along...!
--
James Harris
Yellow
2017-09-27 20:15:55 UTC
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Post by pensive hamster
[...]
Post by tim...
last time I looked we didn't actually grow tea or coffee in the UK
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/17/storm-in-a-teacup-as-gardeners-realise-uk-climate-is-perfect-for/
17 May 2016
Tea lovers are no longer relying on China for supplies and are
increasingly opting to grow plants in their own back gardens as
they realise the British climate is perfect for it, experts have said.
With the "grow your own" movement still in full swing, sales of
Camellia sinensis - the common tea plant - are rocketing as
gardeners realise it thrives in the UK's climate.
Contrary to popular belief, tea plants don't require heat and
humidity to grow, rather preferring temperate regions with
plenty of moisture.
The UK already boasts two tea plantations - one in Cornwall,
which is experiencing its biggest ever yield due to a warm winter,
and the other in the Scottish Highlands - with a third planned for
Northern Ireland.
------------------------------------------
https://tregothnan.co.uk/
Buy British Tea - our silken pyramid bags contain our luxury
loose tea for the most perfectly brewed cup of English tea.
------------------------------------------
British Tea for British Workers, I say!
Well that is something I have learned. Who'd have thought it?
James Harris
2017-09-27 19:13:45 UTC
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...
Post by tim...
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Coffee, tea 6.1%
...
Post by tim...
last time I looked we didn't actually grow tea or coffee in the UK
There! And some Remoaners were looking forward to the decimation of our
tea plantations.
--
James Harris
R. Mark Clayton
2017-09-28 10:25:52 UTC
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Post by James Harris
...
Post by tim...
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Coffee, tea 6.1%
...
Post by tim...
last time I looked we didn't actually grow tea or coffee in the UK
There! And some Remoaners were looking forward to the decimation of our
tea plantations.
--
James Harris
I think there is one in Cornwall - <0.5% of UK consumption - decimation would mean a loss of <0.05% of consumption, almost literally a drop in the bucket.
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