Discussion:
Pound falls as Brexit sell-off gathers pace
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MM
2018-08-08 16:57:06 UTC
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"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.

"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.

"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.

"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.

"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.

"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862

But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?

(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)

MM
Norman Wells
2018-08-08 17:36:12 UTC
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Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.

Didn't happen, did it?

Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 19:43:25 UTC
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"Norman Wells" <***@unseen.ac.am> wrote in message news:***@mid.individual.net...
: On 08/08/2018 17:57, MM wrote:
: > "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
: > on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
: >
: > "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
: > against the yen and Swiss franc.
: >
: > "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
: > no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
: >
: > "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
: > 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
: >
: > "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
: > pushes up the value of sterling.
: >
: > "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
: > the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
: > https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
: >
: > But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
: >
: > (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return ?1.11?)
:
: I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
: result of the Brexit referendum.
:
: Didn't happen, did it?
:
: Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
: willy-waving to want it higher.
:
Yellow
2018-08-08 20:30:54 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
I have relative visiting the UK in a couple of weeks and they are as
pleased as punch as they will be able to spend more.
abelard
2018-08-08 20:35:08 UTC
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Post by Yellow
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
I have relative visiting the UK in a couple of weeks and they are as
pleased as punch as they will be able to spend more.
the pound has been lower...one day it will be higher...
then is will be lower again...

it's lose to irrelevant
--
www.abelard.org
Yellow
2018-08-08 20:39:48 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, abelard3
@abelard.org says...
Post by abelard
Post by Yellow
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return ?1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
I have relative visiting the UK in a couple of weeks and they are as
pleased as punch as they will be able to spend more.
the pound has been lower...one day it will be higher...
then is will be lower again...
it's lose to irrelevant
I agree.
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 21:10:47 UTC
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Righto!



"Yellow" <***@none.com.invalid> wrote in message news:***@News.Individual.NET...
: In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@unseen.ac.am says...
: >
: > On 08/08/2018 17:57, MM wrote:
: > > "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
: > > on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
: > >
: > > "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
: > > against the yen and Swiss franc.
: > >
: > > "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
: > > no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
: > >
: > > "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
: > > 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
: > >
: > > "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
: > > pushes up the value of sterling.
: > >
: > > "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
: > > the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
: > > https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
: > >
: > > But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
: > >
: > > (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
: >
: > I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
: > result of the Brexit referendum.
: >
: > Didn't happen, did it?
: >
: > Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
: > willy-waving to want it higher.
:
: I have relative visiting the UK in a couple of weeks and they are as
: pleased as punch as they will be able to spend more.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-09 17:37:01 UTC
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Post by Yellow
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
I have relative visiting the UK in a couple of weeks and they are as
pleased as punch as they will be able to spend more.
Why don't you go and visit them? Then you will HAVE to spend more.
Yellow
2018-08-10 02:05:43 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
I have relative visiting the UK in a couple of weeks and they are as
pleased as punch as they will be able to spend more.
Why don't you go and visit them? Then you will HAVE to spend more.
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 09:26:17 UTC
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Post by Yellow
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
I have relative visiting the UK in a couple of weeks and they are as
pleased as punch as they will be able to spend more.
Why don't you go and visit them? Then you will HAVE to spend more.
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off. You seem to want Yanks to be able to visit the UK on the cheap.

As this is a UK group I think you will find most posters are Brit's and don't want to pay £££ more for holidays and imported items for the sake of racial purity. That said I would not welcome hoards of US tourists in my locale...
Norman Wells
2018-08-11 10:03:20 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off.
That's very selfish of you.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
You seem to want Yanks to be able to visit the UK on the cheap.
Yes, it's good for the economy.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
As this is a UK group I think you will find most posters are Brit's and don't want to pay £££ more for holidays and imported items for the sake of racial purity. That said I would not welcome hoards of US tourists in my locale...
How about Romanians, Bulgarians, Lithuanians and Poles?

What are you doing to cut down their numbers?
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 10:22:47 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off.
That's very selfish of you.
Self interested maybe, hardly "very selfish".
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
You seem to want Yanks to be able to visit the UK on the cheap.
Yes, it's good for the economy.
It is good if they visit. Less so if they do so on the cheap.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
As this is a UK group I think you will find most posters are Brit's and don't want to pay £££ more for holidays and imported items for the sake of racial purity. That said I would not welcome hoards of US tourists in my locale...
How about Romanians, Bulgarians, Lithuanians and Poles?
What are you doing to cut down their numbers?
Nothing - what do you want - Aktion Rheinard all over again?
Norman Wells
2018-08-11 11:16:43 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off.
That's very selfish of you.
Self interested maybe, hardly "very selfish".
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
You seem to want Yanks to be able to visit the UK on the cheap.
Yes, it's good for the economy.
It is good if they visit. Less so if they do so on the cheap.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
As this is a UK group I think you will find most posters are Brit's and don't want to pay £££ more for holidays and imported items for the sake of racial purity. That said I would not welcome hoards of US tourists in my locale...
How about Romanians, Bulgarians, Lithuanians and Poles?
What are you doing to cut down their numbers?
Nothing - what do you want - Aktion Rheinard all over again?
I just wondered why you've got it in for the Americans but,
inconsistently, not for Europeans, that's all.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 16:42:55 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off.
That's very selfish of you.
Self interested maybe, hardly "very selfish".
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
You seem to want Yanks to be able to visit the UK on the cheap.
Yes, it's good for the economy.
It is good if they visit. Less so if they do so on the cheap.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
As this is a UK group I think you will find most posters are Brit's and don't want to pay £££ more for holidays and imported items for the sake of racial purity. That said I would not welcome hoards of US tourists in my locale...
How about Romanians, Bulgarians, Lithuanians and Poles?
What are you doing to cut down their numbers?
Nothing - what do you want - Aktion Rheinard all over again?
I just wondered why you've got it in for the Americans but,
inconsistently, not for Europeans, that's all.
Not really, I just find loud mouthed US tourists a bot of chore.
Yellow
2018-08-11 16:47:38 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off.
That's very selfish of you.
Self interested maybe, hardly "very selfish".
LOL!
Yellow
2018-08-11 16:46:58 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off. You seem to want Yanks to be able to visit the UK on the cheap.
Not just any yanks but my family, and of course I care more about them
than I do about you. But further, they will be bringing money into the
UK while you wish to take it out.

Seems the lower pound therefore wins 2/0.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
As this is a UK group I think you will find most posters are Brit's and don't want to pay £££ more for holidays
Please realise that you are talking about yourself, not "the group" nor
"the British people", because we do not all holiday in the EU or abroad
at all.

Meanwhile, money coming in from abroad is making us richer while you
going to the Costa-Del-Sol is making us, as a country, poorer.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
and imported items for the sake of racial purity.
?????
Post by R. Mark Clayton
That said I
would not welcome hoards of US tourists in my locale...
Yet you think the EU is happy to have hordes of you?
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 16:50:12 UTC
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Post by Yellow
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
Why would you prefer a Brit to take their money to the USA and spend it
there than have a couple of yanks bring their money here and spend a
couple of weeks supporting UK hotels, restaurants and visitor
attractions?
That depends, as I am a Brit obviously I want to enjoy foreign holidays and not get ripped off. You seem to want Yanks to be able to visit the UK on the cheap.
Not just any yanks but my family, and of course I care more about them
than I do about you. But further, they will be bringing money into the
UK while you wish to take it out.
Seems the lower pound therefore wins 2/0.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
As this is a UK group I think you will find most posters are Brit's and don't want to pay £££ more for holidays
Please realise that you are talking about yourself, not "the group" nor
"the British people", because we do not all holiday in the EU or abroad
at all.
Do check before typing rubbish.

https://abta.com/about-us/press/brits-take-more-holidays-in-past-12-months-than-at-any-point-since-2011
Post by Yellow
Meanwhile, money coming in from abroad is making us richer while you
going to the Costa-Del-Sol is making us, as a country, poorer.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
and imported items for the sake of racial purity.
?????
Post by R. Mark Clayton
That said I
would not welcome hoards of US tourists in my locale...
Yet you think the EU is happy to have hordes of you?
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-08 20:53:13 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The Peeler
2018-08-08 21:59:46 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 13:53:13 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else?
E.g. they could export fags like you en masse, dumb anal gay Razovic! Would
be a boon for the country!
--
Dumb gay anal Razovic about herself:
"And you just wish someone, anyone, anything would cornhole you!"
Yellow
2018-08-08 23:07:02 UTC
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Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.

So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for our
own use verse what we export.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-09 12:57:54 UTC
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Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
Post by Yellow
So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for our
own use verse what we export.
It's not really relevant. What is relevant is that, in general, we
import more than we export, and with a lower pound, the trade gap will
increase.
Yellow
2018-08-09 13:41:18 UTC
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Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.

So, unless you have figures of course, it is not possible to state that
any arbitrary value of the pound is better or worse then any other
arbitrary value of the pound for a given manufacturer.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for our
own use verse what we export.
It's not really relevant.
Of course it is because the country gains wealth by getting more money
in from abroad than it spends out.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
What is relevant is that, in general, we
import more than we export, and with a lower pound, the trade gap will
increase.
Through-put or turn over tells us nothing and instead we need to look at
profit and loss.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-09 14:41:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
Post by Yellow
So, unless you have figures of course, it is not possible to state that
any arbitrary value of the pound is better or worse then any other
arbitrary value of the pound for a given manufacturer.
A lower pound is better for manufacturers who source all their inputs
domestically. And of course it's better for services, without which the
trade gap would be horrendous.
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for our
own use verse what we export.
It's not really relevant.
Of course it is because the country gains wealth by getting more money
in from abroad than it spends out.
That used to happen when Maggie Thatcher was PM. Apart from a short
blip in the mid 1990s, it has rarely happened since.
Yellow
2018-08-09 16:25:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
What is your basis for your claim, that -

import cost + added value < export cost.

- for any given value of the pound?
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So, unless you have figures of course, it is not possible to state that
any arbitrary value of the pound is better or worse then any other
arbitrary value of the pound for a given manufacturer.
A lower pound is better for manufacturers who source all their inputs
domestically. And of course it's better for services, without which the
trade gap would be horrendous.
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for
our
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
own use verse what we export.
It's not really relevant.
Of course it is because the country gains wealth by getting more money
in from abroad than it spends out.
That used to happen when Maggie Thatcher was PM. Apart from a short
blip in the mid 1990s, it has rarely happened since.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-09 18:53:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
What is your basis for your claim, that -
import cost + added value < export cost.
- for any given value of the pound?
Imported materials cost + other raw materials cost + labour cost = total
cost.

What's this 'export cost' of yours?
The Peeler
2018-08-09 19:26:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 11:53:15 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
What is your basis for your claim, that -
import cost + added value < export cost.
- for any given value of the pound?
Imported materials cost + other raw materials cost + labour cost = total
cost.
"labour cost" ROTFLOL! ...and this coming from the unemployable housebound
mentally sick idiot who has been "living" on Usenet for OVER TWENTY YEARS!
LMAO
--
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psychopath, aka "The Rectum":

the desperate psycho can't SLEEP anymore,
she can't get out of the house anymore,
she got NOBODY to talk to anymore,
she can't FUCK anymore,
she got no life outside Usenet AT ALL!
Yellow
2018-08-10 02:19:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
What is your basis for your claim, that -
import cost + added value < export cost.
- for any given value of the pound?
Imported materials cost + other raw materials cost + labour cost = total
cost.
What's this 'export cost' of yours?
The price you sell it for abroad.

What I am trying to explain to you is that even if imports are more
expensive, they only make up part of the value of the item for sale
because of what manufacturing is, and that is adding value to raw
material.

If you sell your manufactured part abroad at the same(ish) exchange
rate, mathematics tells you that the extra money you have had to pay for
the imports will be more than offset by the extra money you get when the
item is sold.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-10 16:56:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
What is your basis for your claim, that -
import cost + added value < export cost.
- for any given value of the pound?
Imported materials cost + other raw materials cost + labour cost = total
cost.
What's this 'export cost' of yours?
The price you sell it for abroad.
What I am trying to explain to you is that even if imports are more
expensive, they only make up part of the value of the item for sale
because of what manufacturing is, and that is adding value to raw
material.
Since Britain basically has no raw materials, they make up an increasing
part of the value of the item. Automation is rapidly depleting the
labour input.

Note also that not all foreign currencies appreciate against the Pound
at the same rate. If your inputs are priced in dollars and you sell in
the Euro market, that differential could be more than enough to wipe out
your competitive advantage.
Post by Yellow
If you sell your manufactured part abroad at the same(ish) exchange
rate, mathematics tells you that the extra money you have had to pay for
the imports will be more than offset by the extra money you get when the
item is sold.
You're relying entirely on cheap labour to make your products
competitive abroad. That's not going to last. That same cheap labour
relies mostly on imported goodies for its standard of living. When's
the last time a television or DVD player was manufactured in the UK?
If labour's compensation does not keep up with the higher cost of living
resulting from a cheap pound, the good labour will go elsewhere, you'll
be left with all the shit labour, quality will drop, and you won't be
able to sell your product at any price.
abelard
2018-08-10 17:14:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 09:56:10 -0700, Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
What is your basis for your claim, that -
import cost + added value < export cost.
- for any given value of the pound?
Imported materials cost + other raw materials cost + labour cost = total
cost.
What's this 'export cost' of yours?
The price you sell it for abroad.
What I am trying to explain to you is that even if imports are more
expensive, they only make up part of the value of the item for sale
because of what manufacturing is, and that is adding value to raw
material.
Since Britain basically has no raw materials, they make up an increasing
part of the value of the item. Automation is rapidly depleting the
labour input.
Note also that not all foreign currencies appreciate against the Pound
at the same rate. If your inputs are priced in dollars and you sell in
the Euro market, that differential could be more than enough to wipe out
your competitive advantage.
Post by Yellow
If you sell your manufactured part abroad at the same(ish) exchange
rate, mathematics tells you that the extra money you have had to pay for
the imports will be more than offset by the extra money you get when the
item is sold.
You're relying entirely on cheap labour to make your products
competitive abroad. That's not going to last. That same cheap labour
relies mostly on imported goodies for its standard of living. When's
the last time a television or DVD player was manufactured in the UK?
If labour's compensation does not keep up with the higher cost of living
resulting from a cheap pound, the good labour will go elsewhere, you'll
be left with all the shit labour, quality will drop, and you won't be
able to sell your product at any price.
people often buy from britain for higher level of abstraction...

eg out top unis and non-government schools...
design...
money expertise...
secure gated communities..and ungated ones!

let secondary countries produce ironmongery like cars :-)
--
www.abelard.org
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-10 17:33:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
In article <***@4ax.com>, abelard3
@abelard.org says...
Post by abelard
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Note also that not all foreign currencies appreciate against the Pound
at the same rate. If your inputs are priced in dollars and you sell in
the Euro market, that differential could be more than enough to wipe out
your competitive advantage.
Post by Yellow
If you sell your manufactured part abroad at the same(ish) exchange
rate, mathematics tells you that the extra money you have had to pay for
the imports will be more than offset by the extra money you get when the
item is sold.
You're relying entirely on cheap labour to make your products
competitive abroad. That's not going to last. That same cheap labour
relies mostly on imported goodies for its standard of living. When's
the last time a television or DVD player was manufactured in the UK?
If labour's compensation does not keep up with the higher cost of living
resulting from a cheap pound, the good labour will go elsewhere, you'll
be left with all the shit labour, quality will drop, and you won't be
able to sell your product at any price.
people often buy from britain for higher level of abstraction...
eg out top unis and non-government schools...
design...
money expertise...
secure gated communities..and ungated ones!
Indeed. Services do very well in the export market with a weak pound.
They could be the ONLY saving grace.
Post by abelard
let secondary countries produce ironmongery like cars :-)
As long as people in the UK are willing/able to pay the correspondingly
higher prices!
abelard
2018-08-10 17:40:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 10:33:17 -0700, Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
@abelard.org says...
Post by abelard
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Note also that not all foreign currencies appreciate against the Pound
at the same rate. If your inputs are priced in dollars and you sell in
the Euro market, that differential could be more than enough to wipe out
your competitive advantage.
Post by Yellow
If you sell your manufactured part abroad at the same(ish) exchange
rate, mathematics tells you that the extra money you have had to pay for
the imports will be more than offset by the extra money you get when the
item is sold.
You're relying entirely on cheap labour to make your products
competitive abroad. That's not going to last. That same cheap labour
relies mostly on imported goodies for its standard of living. When's
the last time a television or DVD player was manufactured in the UK?
If labour's compensation does not keep up with the higher cost of living
resulting from a cheap pound, the good labour will go elsewhere, you'll
be left with all the shit labour, quality will drop, and you won't be
able to sell your product at any price.
people often buy from britain for higher level of abstraction...
eg out top unis and non-government schools...
design...
money expertise...
secure gated communities..and ungated ones!
Indeed. Services do very well in the export market with a weak pound.
They could be the ONLY saving grace.
Post by abelard
let secondary countries produce ironmongery like cars :-)
As long as people in the UK are willing/able to pay the correspondingly
higher prices!
depends on how much we can get for frozen peas...

picked by e. european slaves or by vast british designed
machines guided by british satellites

or we'll have to walk!
--
www.abelard.org
The Peeler
2018-08-10 17:55:47 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 10:33:17 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by abelard
let secondary countries produce ironmongery like cars :-)
As long as people in the UK are willing/able to pay the correspondingly
higher prices!
The REAL funny thing is that your shithole serbia has NO choice about it,
dreckserb Razovic! You simply won't be allowed in the EU! LOL
--
Nefesh about stinking serb peasant Razovic: "All good people shit on the
Revd"
MID: <8560bbb2-d446-4ba9-a3e7-***@c20g2000prc.googlegroups.com>
Yellow
2018-08-10 17:39:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
What is your basis for your claim, that -
import cost + added value < export cost.
- for any given value of the pound?
Imported materials cost + other raw materials cost + labour cost = total
cost.
What's this 'export cost' of yours?
The price you sell it for abroad.
What I am trying to explain to you is that even if imports are more
expensive, they only make up part of the value of the item for sale
because of what manufacturing is, and that is adding value to raw
material.
Since Britain basically has no raw materials, they make up an increasing
part of the value of the item.
Raw materials in this context can also mean finished goods that are used
to make new goods.

Think of a car, where it is built (in part) of bits that are made
elsewhere.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Automation is rapidly depleting the
labour input.
This is not new in manufacturing and I spent the 80s, 90s, and 00s
automating factories.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Note also that not all foreign currencies appreciate against the Pound
at the same rate. If your inputs are priced in dollars and you sell in
the Euro market, that differential could be more than enough to wipe out
your competitive advantage.
Which may work for or against any given manufacturer, as I have already
highlighted in another post in this thread.

There is no perfect exchange rate that will suit everyone.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
If you sell your manufactured part abroad at the same(ish) exchange
rate, mathematics tells you that the extra money you have had to pay for
the imports will be more than offset by the extra money you get when the
item is sold.
You're relying entirely on cheap labour to make your products
competitive abroad.
I have no idea why you have concluded that but the cost of labour does
not alter because the exchange rate has changed so for the purposes of
this discussion it is a constant.

Obviously in the longer term, if we get inflation, there will be calls
for increases in wages but I do not see what that has to do with your
"cheap labour" argument.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
That's not going to last. That same cheap labour
relies mostly on imported goodies for its standard of living. When's
the last time a television or DVD player was manufactured in the UK?
Which is why, again as I highlighted in another post, we should be
looking at imports we use for ourselves vs what we export, rather than
the importing of materials for goods are subsequently exported.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
If labour's compensation does not keep up with the higher cost of living
resulting from a cheap pound, the good labour will go elsewhere, you'll
be left with all the shit labour, quality will drop, and you won't be
able to sell your product at any price.
I can't see people leaving the UK in their droves because the price of
cheese has increased but, as above, imports we use for ourselves vs what
we export is probably of more interest than imports for manufacturing vs
export of manufactured goods.
The Peeler
2018-08-10 17:49:55 UTC
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 09:56:10 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "Shitsack Moishe Goldberg", farted again:

<FLUSH psychopath's usual psychopathic bullshit unread>

...and nothing's left, AGAIN! LOL
--
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"Suck a jew rectum hard enough and diarrhoea will come out!"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
pensive hamster
2018-08-09 19:21:17 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Thursday, 9 August 2018 17:25:21 UTC+1, Yellow wrote:
[...]
Post by Yellow
What is your basis for your claim, that -
import cost + added value < export cost.
- for any given value of the pound?
You may need to add in shipping costs (both inward and outward).

Depending on whether you pay shipping costs in sterling or
foreign currency, that may alter the equation.

And then there is cash flow, which may be adversely affected
if import costs go up.
The Peeler
2018-08-09 16:53:23 UTC
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On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 07:41:57 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
A lower pound is
No pound could ever get as low as you, you lowly serb cretin!
--
Dumb gay anal Razovic about herself:
"And you just wish someone, anyone, anything would cornhole you!"
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-09 17:42:59 UTC
Reply
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SNIP
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
I don't often agree with Yellow, but you have the wrong end of the stick here.
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So, unless you have figures of course, it is not possible to state that
any arbitrary value of the pound is better or worse then any other
arbitrary value of the pound for a given manufacturer.
A lower pound is better for manufacturers who source all their inputs
domestically. And of course it's better for services, without which the
trade gap would be horrendous.
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for
our
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
own use verse what we export.
It's not really relevant.
Of course it is because the country gains wealth by getting more money
in from abroad than it spends out.
That used to happen when Maggie Thatcher was PM. Apart from a short
blip in the mid 1990s, it has rarely happened since.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-09 18:56:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
I don't often agree with Yellow, but you have the wrong end of the stick here.
You're relying on the diminishing role of labour in manufacturing for
your competitive edge with a falling pound?

Sounds like you have the wrong end of the automation stick.
The Peeler
2018-08-09 19:30:01 UTC
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On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 11:56:53 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by R. Mark Clayton
I don't often agree with Yellow, but you have the wrong end of the stick here.
You're relying on the diminishing role of labour in manufacturing for
your competitive edge with a falling pound?
Sounds like you have the wrong end of the automation stick.
The ONLY "stick" you know something about is the one alternately in your
arse and your gob, dumb anal dreckserb!
--
Dumb gay anal Razovic about herself:
"And you just wish someone, anyone, anything would cornhole you!"
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 09:28:12 UTC
Reply
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Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
But as I said - the finished item will be cheaper to sell abroad.
But if the costs of manufacturing the finished item are excessive
because of expensive imports, you won't be able to sell it abroad
without making a loss, even with a cheap pound. What would be the point
of that?
I don't often agree with Yellow, but you have the wrong end of the stick here.
You're relying on the diminishing role of labour in manufacturing for
your competitive edge with a falling pound?
Sounds like you have the wrong end of the automation stick.
If any value is added in the UK it either comes from primary production or [massively more likely] added value, True the value can be added by expensive machinery, however normally it is labour.
Handsome Jack
2018-08-09 15:14:02 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
No it wouldn't. The cost of imported raw materials (in dollars) would
stay the same as it was before, whereas the cost of the labour input to
the finished product (in dollars) would *fall*, because UK labour is
paid in pounds. The offer price of the finished product (in dollars) is
the sum of those two terms, and therefore it *falls* in dollar terms,
making it more competitive on world markets
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for our
own use verse what we export.
It's not really relevant. What is relevant is that, in general, we
import more than we export, and with a lower pound, the trade gap will
increase.
You're hopelessly, ignorantly wrong, son.
--
Jack
abelard
2018-08-09 15:21:18 UTC
Reply
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Post by Handsome Jack
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
The manufacturing industry adds value so even if all the raw material
was imported, a lower pound means exporting would potentially be more
profitable than with a higher pound.
Importing all the raw material with a lower pound would mean paying more
for manufacturing inputs, which in turn would make the manufactured
output more expensive and therefore less competitive, even with a lower
pound.
No it wouldn't. The cost of imported raw materials (in dollars) would
stay the same as it was before, whereas the cost of the labour input to
the finished product (in dollars) would *fall*, because UK labour is
paid in pounds. The offer price of the finished product (in dollars) is
the sum of those two terms, and therefore it *falls* in dollar terms,
making it more competitive on world markets
wow..i'm impressed :-)
Post by Handsome Jack
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Yellow
So perhaps What you really need to consider is what we import for our
own use verse what we export.
It's not really relevant. What is relevant is that, in general, we
import more than we export, and with a lower pound, the trade gap will
increase.
You're hopelessly, ignorantly wrong, son.
--
www.abelard.org
The Peeler
2018-08-09 16:53:03 UTC
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On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 05:57:54 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
It's not really relevant. What is relevant is that, in general, we
import more than we export, and with a lower pound, the trade gap will
increase.
That gap can't increase as much as the huge gap of your overused anus,
dreckserb Razovic!
--
Retarded, anal, subnormal and extremely proud of it: our resident
psychopath, dumb serbian bitch G. Razovic (aka "The Rectum").
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-09 17:40:15 UTC
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Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
Ah but the Brexiteer answer to this is that in real [aka dollar / Euro] terms labour costs are less, making UK produced goods more competitive

of course workers wages don't go as far, but when did Brexiteers ever care about the economic cost to ordinary people.
Norman Wells
2018-08-09 17:51:03 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
Ah but the Brexiteer answer to this is that in real [aka dollar / Euro] terms labour costs are less, making UK produced goods more competitive
That's not a Brexiteer answer, it's an unassailable economic one.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-09 17:52:12 UTC
Reply
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
Ah but the Brexiteer answer to this is that in real [aka dollar / Euro] terms labour costs are less, making UK produced goods more competitive
That's not a Brexiteer answer, it's an unassailable economic one.
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
Norman Wells
2018-08-09 19:17:45 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
Ah but the Brexiteer answer to this is that in real [aka dollar / Euro] terms labour costs are less, making UK produced goods more competitive
That's not a Brexiteer answer, it's an unassailable economic one.
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
The exchange rate has little to do with the reality of the economy. An
economy doesn't fall by 10% overnight just because there's been a vote,
yet that's what happened after the referendum.

The truth is, it's set by speculators trading in currencies, all
gambling in the hope of making a profit. As such, you can't read
anything into it at all. And it's not a Brexiteer strategy to lower the
exchange rate. They can't influence it any more than you or I can.

The lower the exchange rate, the more it aids exporters. It makes
imports more expensive of course, but that encourages buying goods
produced here, which again is a good thing for the domestic economy. It
encourages tourism here and discourages Brits holidaying abroad. Again,
that's good for the UK economy.

Ordinary workers aren't greatly affected by the exchange rate one way or
the other.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 09:37:55 UTC
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SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Ah but the Brexiteer answer to this is that in real [aka dollar / Euro] terms labour costs are less, making UK produced goods more competitive
That's not a Brexiteer answer, it's an unassailable economic one.
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
The exchange rate has little to do with the reality of the economy. An
economy doesn't fall by 10% overnight just because there's been a vote,
yet that's what happened after the referendum.
Yes it does and yes it did - overnight everyone who had money (not just a minority of speculators) downgraded their long term view of the health of the UK economy on the basis of Leave winning. Over two year later and the pound is still down - that is NOT the result of overnight speculation.
Post by Norman Wells
The truth is, it's set by speculators trading in currencies, all
gambling in the hope of making a profit.
Wrong again - the vast majority of Fx trades are either conversion of simple payments or manufacturers hedging against future currency movements (they buy or sell futures contract to protect their future transactions from sudden movements.
Post by Norman Wells
As such, you can't read anything into it at all.
True for an overnight fluctuation of 10% (OTOH one of the largest ever), but when sterling is still sick over two years later from the same cause...
Post by Norman Wells
And it's not a Brexiteer strategy to lower the
exchange rate. They can't influence it any more than you or I can.
Clearly they can - Davis opens his mouth and the there is another big sell off of the pound...

OTOH Brextremists didn't set out to do down the pound - they naively that leaving would be a big boost for the economy (and ergo the pound) despite everyone telling them the opposite.
Post by Norman Wells
The lower the exchange rate, the more it aids exporters. It makes
imports more expensive of course, but that encourages buying goods
produced here, which again is a good thing for the domestic economy. It
encourages tourism here and discourages Brits holidaying abroad. Again,
that's good for the UK economy.
Ordinary workers aren't greatly affected by the exchange rate one way or
the other.
Apart from inflation or a big rise in the cost of their two weeks in Benidorm...
Norman Wells
2018-08-11 10:09:58 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Ah but the Brexiteer answer to this is that in real [aka dollar / Euro] terms labour costs are less, making UK produced goods more competitive
That's not a Brexiteer answer, it's an unassailable economic one.
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
The exchange rate has little to do with the reality of the economy. An
economy doesn't fall by 10% overnight just because there's been a vote,
yet that's what happened after the referendum.
Yes it does and yes it did - overnight everyone who had money (not just a minority of speculators) downgraded their long term view of the health of the UK economy on the basis of Leave winning. Over two year later and the pound is still down - that is NOT the result of overnight speculation.
It's continued speculation. All currency trades are speculation.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
The truth is, it's set by speculators trading in currencies, all
gambling in the hope of making a profit.
Wrong again - the vast majority of Fx trades are either conversion of simple payments or manufacturers hedging against future currency movements (they buy or sell futures contract to protect their future transactions from sudden movements.
Yes, it's called speculation. They're hoping to make a profit from
their currency dealings, or reduce a loss, which amounts to the same thing.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
As such, you can't read anything into it at all.
True for an overnight fluctuation of 10% (OTOH one of the largest ever), but when sterling is still sick over two years later from the same cause...
Who sets the rate, and how?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
And it's not a Brexiteer strategy to lower the
exchange rate. They can't influence it any more than you or I can.
Clearly they can - Davis opens his mouth and the there is another big sell off of the pound...
By 'currency traders', ie speculators. Who else?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
OTOH Brextremists didn't set out to do down the pound - they naively that leaving would be a big boost for the economy (and ergo the pound) despite everyone telling them the opposite.
Post by Norman Wells
The lower the exchange rate, the more it aids exporters. It makes
imports more expensive of course, but that encourages buying goods
produced here, which again is a good thing for the domestic economy. It
encourages tourism here and discourages Brits holidaying abroad. Again,
that's good for the UK economy.
Ordinary workers aren't greatly affected by the exchange rate one way or
the other.
Apart from inflation or a big rise in the cost of their two weeks in Benidorm...
If the UK is good enough for all those US citizens to come here for a
holiday, why not for Brits to stay in the UK?
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 10:28:33 UTC
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SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Yes it does and yes it did - overnight everyone who had money (not just a minority of speculators) downgraded their long term view of the health of the UK economy on the basis of Leave winning. Over two year later and the pound is still down - that is NOT the result of overnight speculation.
It's continued speculation. All currency trades are speculation.
So I buy Euro to go on holiday and it is speculation - rubbish.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
The truth is, it's set by speculators trading in currencies, all
gambling in the hope of making a profit.
Wrong again - the vast majority of Fx trades are either conversion of simple payments or manufacturers hedging against future currency movements (they buy or sell futures contract to protect their future transactions from sudden movements.
Yes, it's called speculation. They're hoping to make a profit from
their currency dealings,
that is speculation
Post by Norman Wells
or reduce a loss, which amounts to the same thing.
which is not, but much more akin to insurance, where one pays a premium to transfer the risk of your house burning down or your car being stolen.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
As such, you can't read anything into it at all.
True for an overnight fluctuation of 10% (OTOH one of the largest ever), but when sterling is still sick over two years later from the same cause...
Who sets the rate, and how?
The market sets the rate, by balancing the price people will pay for different currencies.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
And it's not a Brexiteer strategy to lower the
exchange rate. They can't influence it any more than you or I can.
Clearly they can - Davis opens his mouth and the there is another big sell off of the pound...
By 'currency traders', ie speculators. Who else?
In the very short term - a hard Brexit will make this long term [and worse].
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
OTOH Brextremists didn't set out to do down the pound - they naively that leaving would be a big boost for the economy (and ergo the pound) despite everyone telling them the opposite.
Post by Norman Wells
The lower the exchange rate, the more it aids exporters. It makes
imports more expensive of course, but that encourages buying goods
produced here, which again is a good thing for the domestic economy. It
encourages tourism here and discourages Brits holidaying abroad. Again,
that's good for the UK economy.
Ordinary workers aren't greatly affected by the exchange rate one way or
the other.
Apart from inflation or a big rise in the cost of their two weeks in Benidorm...
If the UK is good enough for all those US citizens to come here for a
holiday, why not for Brits to stay in the UK?
If more foreign tourists visit and more Brit's stay at home then increased demand will increase prices in the UK. That's the trouble with Brexit, however you slice it Brits LOSE.
Ian Jackson
2018-08-10 07:27:26 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers
have said they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us)
end up being poorer.
--
Ian
kat
2018-08-10 07:32:11 UTC
Reply
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
--
kat
^..^<
The Peeler
2018-08-10 08:52:50 UTC
Reply
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Post by kat
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
Or lower priorities, like their hatred and narrow-mindedness. ;-)
Yellow
2018-08-10 12:45:02 UTC
Reply
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@hotmail.com
says...
Post by kat
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.

It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Ian Jackson
2018-08-10 14:47:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many
Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
Well, some of the more 'patrio-emotional' in-phoners really didn't seem
to care how long it would take to break even, and start becoming richer
than we had been before Brexit.
Post by Yellow
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt
if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer. It was only
when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably
never really bothered to consider) were subsequently pointed out to them
that they tried to find credible explanations for they way they has
voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get my country back" (or
similar).
--
Ian
Bod
2018-08-10 14:56:18 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many
Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
Well, some of the more 'patrio-emotional' in-phoners really didn't seem
to care how long it would take to break even, and start becoming richer
than we had been before Brexit.
Post by Yellow
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt
if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer. It was only
when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably
never really bothered to consider) were subsequently pointed out to them
that they tried to find credible explanations for they way they has
voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get my country back" (or
similar).
UK economy on track to grow at fastest since fourth quarter 2016 - NIESR
LONDON (Reuters) - Britain’s economy looks on track to grow at its
fastest rate since the tail end of 2016, according to an estimate from
the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) on Friday.

https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-economy-niesr/uk-economy-on-track-to-grow-at-fastest-since-q4-2016-niesr-idUKKBN1KV1IV
--
Bod
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-10 16:57:26 UTC
Reply
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@yahoo.co.uk
says...
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up
being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike
Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
Well, some of the more 'patrio-emotional' in-phoners really didn't seem
to care how long it would take to break even, and start becoming richer
than we had been before Brexit.
Post by Yellow
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt
if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer. It was only
when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably
never really bothered to consider) were subsequently pointed out to them
that they tried to find credible explanations for they way they has
voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get my country back" (or
similar).
UK economy on track to grow at fastest since fourth quarter 2016 - NIESR
LONDON (Reuters) - Britain?s economy looks on track to grow at its
fastest rate since the tail end of 2016, according to an estimate from
the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) on Friday.
What is the value of this economy measured in? Cheaper pounds? What
does it look like on a dollar basis?
The Peeler
2018-08-10 18:05:30 UTC
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 09:57:26 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
LONDON (Reuters) - Britain?s economy looks on track to grow at its
fastest rate since the tail end of 2016, according to an estimate from
the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) on Friday.
What is the value of this economy measured in? Cheaper pounds? What
does it look like on a dollar basis?
It looks extremely good on a dinar basis, dreckserb Razovic! LOL
--
Shadow about anal Razovic:
"Not forgetting that her asshole is bigger than her brain."
MID: <57f3d883$0$10651$b1db1813$***@news.astraweb.com>
Yellow
2018-08-10 17:10:32 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many
Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
Well, some of the more 'patrio-emotional' in-phoners really didn't seem
to care how long it would take to break even, and start becoming richer
than we had been before Brexit.
Post by Yellow
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt
if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer.
This statement is used to claim that 'people', because "no one voted to
be poorer", are not prepared to be poorer to achieve the goal of leaving
the EU - which is a lie.

I am 'people' and I am prepared to be poorer. I do not however demand
it.

But we have been through all this before.
Post by Ian Jackson
It was only
when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably
never really bothered to consider) were subsequently pointed out to them
that they tried to find credible explanations for they way they has
voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get my country back" (or
similar).
We were told before the vote we risked being poorer if we left the EU
yet the majority who expressed a preference still voted to leave.

But again, we have been through all this before.
Ian Jackson
2018-08-10 21:45:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by Yellow
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up
being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
Well, some of the more 'patrio-emotional' in-phoners really didn't seem
to care how long it would take to break even, and start becoming richer
than we had been before Brexit.
Post by Yellow
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt
if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer.
This statement is used to claim that 'people', because "no one voted to
be poorer", are not prepared to be poorer to achieve the goal of leaving
the EU - which is a lie.
I am 'people' and I am prepared to be poorer. I do not however demand
it.
But we have been through all this before.
Post by Ian Jackson
It was only
when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably
never really bothered to consider) were subsequently pointed out to them
that they tried to find credible explanations for they way they has
voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get my country back" (or
similar).
We were told before the vote we risked being poorer if we left the EU
yet the majority who expressed a preference still voted to leave.
What!?! I certainly don't recall much mention of risking being poorer!
On the contrary, I thought we were told that we would be better off
outside the EU, where we could make all those tasty independent trade
deals with the Rest Of The World (Sunny Uplands in a Land Of Milk And
Honey - and all that jazz).
Post by Yellow
But again, we have been through all this before.
Despite this, reality is still being denied.
--
Ian
Yellow
2018-08-11 03:09:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many
Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up
being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike
Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
Well, some of the more 'patrio-emotional' in-phoners really didn't seem
to care how long it would take to break even, and start becoming richer
than we had been before Brexit.
Post by Yellow
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt
if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer.
This statement is used to claim that 'people', because "no one voted to
be poorer", are not prepared to be poorer to achieve the goal of leaving
the EU - which is a lie.
I am 'people' and I am prepared to be poorer. I do not however demand
it.
But we have been through all this before.
Post by Ian Jackson
It was only
when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably
never really bothered to consider) were subsequently pointed out to them
that they tried to find credible explanations for they way they has
voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get my country back" (or
similar).
We were told before the vote we risked being poorer if we left the EU
yet the majority who expressed a preference still voted to leave.
What!?! I certainly don't recall much mention of risking being poorer!
You are claiming that the remain campaign otherwise know as "Project
Fear" passed you by?

Because if you are, I do not believe you.
Post by Ian Jackson
On the contrary, I thought we were told that we would be better off
outside the EU, where we could make all those tasty independent trade
deals with the Rest Of The World (Sunny Uplands in a Land Of Milk And
Honey - and all that jazz).
Post by Yellow
But again, we have been through all this before.
Despite this, reality is still being denied.
Pelican
2018-08-10 19:21:05 UTC
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Post by Yellow
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up
being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike
Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
Well, some of the more 'patrio-emotional' in-phoners really didn't seem
to care how long it would take to break even, and start becoming richer
than we had been before Brexit.
Post by Yellow
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt
if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer.
This statement is used to claim that 'people', because "no one voted to
be poorer", are not prepared to be poorer to achieve the goal of leaving
the EU - which is a lie.
I am 'people' and I am prepared to be poorer. I do not however demand
it.
But we have been through all this before.
Post by Ian Jackson
It was only
when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably
never really bothered to consider) were subsequently pointed out to them
that they tried to find credible explanations for they way they has
voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get my country back" (or
similar).
We were told before the vote we risked being poorer if we left the EU
yet the majority who expressed a preference still voted to leave.
What!?! I certainly don't recall much mention of risking being poorer!
You are claiming that the remain campaign otherwise know as "Project
Fear" passed you by?
That description equally applies to the Brexit campaign, but with much
more effect.
Post by Yellow
Because if you are, I do not believe you.
Post by Ian Jackson
On the contrary, I thought we were told that we would be better off
outside the EU, where we could make all those tasty independent trade
deals with the Rest Of The World (Sunny Uplands in a Land Of Milk And
Honey - and all that jazz).
Post by Yellow
But again, we have been through all this before.
Despite this, reality is still being denied.
Yellow
2018-08-11 16:36:57 UTC
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Post by Pelican
Post by Yellow
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
We were told before the vote we risked being poorer if we left the EU
yet the majority who expressed a preference still voted to leave.
What!?! I certainly don't recall much mention of risking being poorer!
You are claiming that the remain campaign otherwise know as "Project
Fear" passed you by?
That description equally applies to the Brexit campaign, but with much
more effect.
So are you denying that people were told that we could be poorer if we
chose to leave the EU?
kat
2018-08-10 20:43:24 UTC
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Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt if even
the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer. It was only when some of the
downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably never really bothered to
consider) were subsequently pointed out to them that they tried to find credible
explanations for they way they has voted. The most popular one is, of course,
"To get my country back" (or similar).
No, they didn't have to /find/ credible explanations. They had them already, to
their own satisfaction, or they wouldn't have voted that way. But people who
think that money is everything just don't accept that there can be these other
explanations. It really doesn't matter if you and Mr O'Brien think that "to get
my country back" is nonsense, they felt it important - more important than a few
quid for a few years.
--
kat
^..^<
Ian Jackson
2018-08-10 21:58:52 UTC
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Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I
doubt if even the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer. It
was only when some of the downside consequences of Brexit (which
they'd probably never really bothered to consider) were subsequently
pointed out to them that they tried to find credible explanations for
they way they has voted. The most popular one is, of course, "To get
my country back" (or similar).
No, they didn't have to /find/ credible explanations. They had them
already, to their own satisfaction, or they wouldn't have voted that
way. But people who think that money is everything just don't accept
that there can be these other explanations. It really doesn't matter
if you and Mr O'Brien think that "to get my country back" is nonsense,
they felt it important - more important than a few quid for a few years.
You can only 'get your country back' if you've actually lost it. The
reality is that by choosing to be a member of a club, we only lost a
little of our absolute independence. Unfortunately, if we're still going
to continue to deal with the club (even though we're no longer a
member), we're not really to regain much 'independence'. We're still
going to have to conform with many of its rules and regulations.
--
Ian
Pelican
2018-08-10 22:18:51 UTC
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Post by Ian Jackson
 Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I
doubt if even  the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer. It
was only when some of the  downside consequences of Brexit (which
they'd probably never really bothered to  consider) were subsequently
pointed out to them that they tried to find credible explanations for
they way they has voted. The most popular one is, of course,  "To get
my country back" (or similar).
No, they didn't have to /find/ credible explanations.  They had them
already, to their own satisfaction,  or they wouldn't have voted that
way.  But people who think that money is everything just don't accept
that there can be these other explanations.  It really doesn't matter
if you and Mr O'Brien think that "to get my country back" is nonsense,
they felt it important - more important than a few quid for a few years.
You can only 'get your country back' if you've actually lost it. The
reality is that by choosing to be a member of a club, we only lost a
little of our absolute independence. Unfortunately, if we're still going
to continue to deal with the club (even though we're no longer a
member), we're not really to regain much 'independence'. We're still
going to have to conform with many of its rules and regulations.
All of which is to say that Brexit will achieve little that is positive
in political and economic terms for the UK. That's down to those who
should have provided a much stronger case for remaining in the EU, but
left the field to the xenophobes by default.
kat
2018-08-10 22:42:13 UTC
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Raw Message
writes
 Despite some of the ludicrous expressions of 'patrio-bravado', I doubt if
even  the daftest Brexiteer really DID vote to be poorer. It was only when
some of the  downside consequences of Brexit (which they'd probably never
really bothered to  consider) were subsequently pointed out to them that they
tried to find credible explanations for they way they has voted. The most
popular one is, of course,  "To get my country back" (or similar).
No, they didn't have to /find/ credible explanations.  They had them already,
to their own satisfaction,  or they wouldn't have voted that way.  But people
who think that money is everything just don't accept that there can be these
other explanations.  It really doesn't matter if you and Mr O'Brien think that
"to get my country back" is nonsense, they felt it important - more important
than a few quid for a few years.
You can only 'get your country back' if you've actually lost it. The reality is
that by choosing to be a member of a club, we only lost a little of our absolute
independence. Unfortunately, if we're still going to continue to deal with the
club (even though we're no longer a member), we're not really to regain much
'independence'. We're still going to have to conform with many of its rules and
regulations.
You can argue about it until the cows come home, that you don't agree isn't the
point, is it. They don't agree that they should have voted remain to make you
richer, either.
--
kat
^..^<
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-11 09:39:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Yellow
says...
Post by kat
Post by R. Mark Clayton
So that's the Brexit plan - make workers poorer?
As James o'Brien has found out on several occasions, many Brexiteers have said
they will be quite happy if they (and, of course, all of us) end up being poorer.
One could assume they have higher priorities than mere money, unlike Remainers then.
Except Ian is not quite telling it as it is because what people actually
say is that they are prepared to be poorer, and generally only expect
this to be in the short term, not that they are happy to be poorer.
It is a bit like the "no one voted to be poorer" nonsense - playing
games to make it sound like people who do not agree with your position
actually do.
Indeed - many voted Leave to get rid of the eastern European untermensche, blithely believing the £350M per week for the NHS and other Leave nonsense,
Norman Wells
2018-08-11 10:15:42 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Indeed - many voted Leave to get rid of the eastern European untermensche, blithely believing the £350M per week for the NHS and other Leave nonsense,
It's amazing how Remoaners just *know* why those who voted to leave did
so, isn't it? And it's all so simple.

But they never seem to acknowledge the patronising, superior attitude
they exhibit that would turn anyone against them.
Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
2018-08-09 19:00:26 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
Didn't happen, did it?
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
willy-waving to want it higher.
WHAT exporters? JCB and who else? Let's not forget that a lower pound
means paying more for the raw materials and other inputs that go IN to
these 'exports'.
Ah but the Brexiteer answer to this is that in real [aka dollar / Euro] terms labour costs are less, making UK produced goods more competitive
of course workers wages don't go as far, but when did Brexiteers ever care about the economic cost to ordinary people.
And since workers rely on imported goodies for their standard of living,
labour costs will eventually have to rise to keep pace, negating any
competitive advantage of a lower pound.
The Peeler
2018-08-09 19:31:53 UTC
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On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 12:00:26 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
Post by Shitsack Moishe Goldberg
And since workers rely on imported goodies for their standard of living,
labour costs will eventually have to rise to keep pace, negating any
competitive advantage of a lower pound.
Shouldn't faze you, you unemployable mentally sick housebound cripple!
--
"The Jews" to poor dumb anal Razovic:
"Nobody here gets tired of exposing you for the idiot you are, Gordon!"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
Mike >
2018-08-09 00:09:28 UTC
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!> "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
!> on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
!>
!> "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
!> against the yen and Swiss franc.
!>
!> "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
!> no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
!>
!> "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
!> 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
!>
!> "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
!> pushes up the value of sterling.
!>
!> "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
!> the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
!> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
!>
!> But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
!>
!> (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
!
!I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
!result of the Brexit referendum.
!
!Didn't happen, did it?
!
!Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters. It's only
!willy-waving to want it higher.
Last years exports a record of 389 bn pounds and

that doesnt include 70 bn agreement Boris engineered with Saudis

he he he sell more weapons . Let muslims kill muslims .. they live for
it anyway
Nightjar
2018-08-09 08:24:31 UTC
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On 08/08/2018 18:36, Norman Wells wrote:
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter. A weak pound my help some (but not all) exporters, but
a strong pound helps our balance of payments.
--
--

Colin Bignell
abelard
2018-08-09 11:26:29 UTC
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Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter. A weak pound my help some (but not all) exporters, but
a strong pound helps our balance of payments.
why does anyone care about the so-called balance of payments?


from 1847!
https://www.abelard.org/economics/frederic_bastiat_free_markets.php#bop
the balance of payments, socialist economic theory vs reality

I was at Bordeaux. I had a cask of wine which was worth 50 francs; I
sent it to Liverpool, and the customhouse noted on its records an
export of 50 francs.

At Liverpool the wine was sold for 70 francs. My representative
converted the 70 francs into coal, which was found to be worth 90
francs on the market at Bordeaux. The customhouse hastened to record
an import of 90 francs.

Balance of trade, or the excess of imports over exports: 40 francs.

These 40 francs, I have always believed, putting my trust in my books,
I had gained. But M. Mauguin tells me that I have lost them, and that
France has lost them in my person.

And why does M. Mauguin see a loss here? Because he supposes that any
excess of imports over exports necessarily implies a balance that must
be paid in cash. But where is there in the transaction that I speak
of, which follows the pattern of all profitable commercial
transactions, any balance to pay? Is it, then, so difficult to
understand that a merchant compares the prices current in different
markets and decides to trade only when he has the certainty, or at
least the probability, of seeing the exported value return to him
increased? Hence, what M. Mauguin calls loss should be called profit.

A few days after my transaction I had the simplicity to experience
regret; I was sorry I had not waited. In fact, the price of wine fell
at Bordeaux and rose at Liverpool; so that if I had not been so hasty,
I could have bought at 40 francs and sold at 100 francs. I truly
believed that on such a basis my profit would have been greater. But I
learn from M. Mauguin that it is the loss that would have been more
ruinous.

My second transaction had a very different result.

I had had some truffles shipped from Périgord which cost me 100
francs; they were destined for two distinguished English cabinet
ministers for a very high price, which I proposed to turn into pounds
sterling. Alas, I would have done better to eat them myself (I mean
the truffles, not the English pounds or the Tories). All would not
have been lost, as they were, for the ship that carried them off sank
on its departure. The customs officer, who had noted on this occasion
an export of 100 francs, never had any re-import to enter in this
case.

Hence, M. Mauguin would say, France gained 100 francs; for it was, in
fact, by this sum that the export, thanks to the shipwreck, exceeded
the import. If the affair had turned out otherwise, if I had received
200 or 300 francs' worth of English pounds, then the balance of trade
would have been unfavorable, and France would have been the loser.

From the point of view of science, it is sad to think that all the
commercial transactions which end in loss according to the businessmen
concerned show a profit according to that class of theorists who are
always declaiming against theory.
--
www.abelard.org
Nightjar
2018-08-10 08:00:38 UTC
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Post by abelard
Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter. A weak pound my help some (but not all) exporters, but
a strong pound helps our balance of payments.
why does anyone care about the so-called balance of payments?
Mr Micawber:

"Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and
six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure
twenty pounds ought and six, result misery."
Post by abelard
from 1847!
https://www.abelard.org/economics/frederic_bastiat_free_markets.php#bop
the balance of payments, socialist economic theory vs reality
I was at Bordeaux. I had a cask of wine which was worth 50 francs; I
sent it to Liverpool, and the customhouse noted on its records an
export of 50 francs.
At Liverpool the wine was sold for 70 francs. My representative
converted the 70 francs into coal, which was found to be worth 90
francs on the market at Bordeaux. The customhouse hastened to record
an import of 90 francs.
Balance of trade, or the excess of imports over exports: 40 francs.
These 40 francs, I have always believed, putting my trust in my books,
I had gained. But M. Mauguin tells me that I have lost them, and that
France has lost them in my person.
And why does M. Mauguin see a loss here? Because he supposes that any
excess of imports over exports necessarily implies a balance that must
be paid in cash. But where is there in the transaction that I speak
of, which follows the pattern of all profitable commercial
transactions, any balance to pay? Is it, then, so difficult to
understand that a merchant compares the prices current in different
markets and decides to trade only when he has the certainty, or at
least the probability, of seeing the exported value return to him
increased? Hence, what M. Mauguin calls loss should be called profit.
A few days after my transaction I had the simplicity to experience
regret; I was sorry I had not waited. In fact, the price of wine fell
at Bordeaux and rose at Liverpool; so that if I had not been so hasty,
I could have bought at 40 francs and sold at 100 francs. I truly
believed that on such a basis my profit would have been greater. But I
learn from M. Mauguin that it is the loss that would have been more
ruinous.
My second transaction had a very different result.
I had had some truffles shipped from Périgord which cost me 100
francs; they were destined for two distinguished English cabinet
ministers for a very high price, which I proposed to turn into pounds
sterling. Alas, I would have done better to eat them myself (I mean
the truffles, not the English pounds or the Tories). All would not
have been lost, as they were, for the ship that carried them off sank
on its departure. The customs officer, who had noted on this occasion
an export of 100 francs, never had any re-import to enter in this
case.
Hence, M. Mauguin would say, France gained 100 francs; for it was, in
fact, by this sum that the export, thanks to the shipwreck, exceeded
the import. If the affair had turned out otherwise, if I had received
200 or 300 francs' worth of English pounds, then the balance of trade
would have been unfavorable, and France would have been the loser.
From the point of view of science, it is sad to think that all the
commercial transactions which end in loss according to the businessmen
concerned show a profit according to that class of theorists who are
always declaiming against theory.
This illustrates that the interests of wealthy individuals do not
necessarily align with the best interests of the country.
--
--

Colin Bignell
Joe
2018-08-10 08:20:57 UTC
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 09:00:38 +0100
Post by Nightjar
This illustrates that the interests of wealthy individuals do not
necessarily align with the best interests of the country.
Do you have any views on what the Pope's religion might be?
--
Joe
abelard
2018-08-10 09:25:16 UTC
Reply
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Post by Nightjar
Post by abelard
Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter. A weak pound my help some (but not all) exporters, but
a strong pound helps our balance of payments.
why does anyone care about the so-called balance of payments?
"Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and
six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure
twenty pounds ought and six, result misery."
'a country' can print money...mr micawber cannot...
when 'a country' can't pay its bills, it can tax by main
force mr micawber...like take his house or his chickens...
when mr micawber cannot both buy his food and pay
'the government'/country...and 'the country' has all
the guns, mr micawber may well starve unto death...

that's why socialists take your guns away...

the economics of mr micawber don't work the same way
as the economics of 'the country'
Post by Nightjar
Post by abelard
from 1847!
https://www.abelard.org/economics/frederic_bastiat_free_markets.php#bop
the balance of payments, socialist economic theory vs reality
I was at Bordeaux. I had a cask of wine which was worth 50 francs; I
sent it to Liverpool, and the customhouse noted on its records an
export of 50 francs.
At Liverpool the wine was sold for 70 francs. My representative
converted the 70 francs into coal, which was found to be worth 90
francs on the market at Bordeaux. The customhouse hastened to record
an import of 90 francs.
Balance of trade, or the excess of imports over exports: 40 francs.
These 40 francs, I have always believed, putting my trust in my books,
I had gained. But M. Mauguin tells me that I have lost them, and that
France has lost them in my person.
And why does M. Mauguin see a loss here? Because he supposes that any
excess of imports over exports necessarily implies a balance that must
be paid in cash. But where is there in the transaction that I speak
of, which follows the pattern of all profitable commercial
transactions, any balance to pay? Is it, then, so difficult to
understand that a merchant compares the prices current in different
markets and decides to trade only when he has the certainty, or at
least the probability, of seeing the exported value return to him
increased? Hence, what M. Mauguin calls loss should be called profit.
A few days after my transaction I had the simplicity to experience
regret; I was sorry I had not waited. In fact, the price of wine fell
at Bordeaux and rose at Liverpool; so that if I had not been so hasty,
I could have bought at 40 francs and sold at 100 francs. I truly
believed that on such a basis my profit would have been greater. But I
learn from M. Mauguin that it is the loss that would have been more
ruinous.
My second transaction had a very different result.
I had had some truffles shipped from Périgord which cost me 100
francs; they were destined for two distinguished English cabinet
ministers for a very high price, which I proposed to turn into pounds
sterling. Alas, I would have done better to eat them myself (I mean
the truffles, not the English pounds or the Tories). All would not
have been lost, as they were, for the ship that carried them off sank
on its departure. The customs officer, who had noted on this occasion
an export of 100 francs, never had any re-import to enter in this
case.
Hence, M. Mauguin would say, France gained 100 francs; for it was, in
fact, by this sum that the export, thanks to the shipwreck, exceeded
the import. If the affair had turned out otherwise, if I had received
200 or 300 francs' worth of English pounds, then the balance of trade
would have been unfavorable, and France would have been the loser.
From the point of view of science, it is sad to think that all the
commercial transactions which end in loss according to the businessmen
concerned show a profit according to that class of theorists who are
always declaiming against theory.
This illustrates that the interests of wealthy individuals do not
necessarily align with the best interests of the country.
how does 'the country' lose when an individual in that country
brings in a profit?
--
www.abelard.org
Joe
2018-08-10 10:47:05 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 11:25:16 +0200
Post by abelard
Post by Nightjar
Post by abelard
why does anyone care about the so-called balance of payments?
"Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen
and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual
expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery."
'a country' can print money...mr micawber cannot...
when 'a country' can't pay its bills, it can tax by main
force mr micawber...like take his house or his chickens...
when mr micawber cannot both buy his food and pay
'the government'/country...and 'the country' has all
the guns, mr micawber may well starve unto death...
that's why socialists take your guns away...
the economics of mr micawber don't work the same way
as the economics of 'the country'
Correct, but it's a currency issue. We buy imports with Pounds, because
we're not allowed to print the currency of any other country. What do
the foreign countries buy with those Pounds? Our exports, to some
extent, but what about all the excess Pounds? The 'balance of payments'
worth of Pounds every year? How many foreigners/countries will want to
keep large reserves of Pounds? What can they be spent on?

Nothing really, other than physical bits of the UK. So we're selling
land and houses and businesses to foreigners to soak up their Pounds.
For how long is that sustainable?
--
Joe
abelard
2018-08-10 11:30:00 UTC
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Post by Joe
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 11:25:16 +0200
Post by abelard
Post by Nightjar
Post by abelard
why does anyone care about the so-called balance of payments?
"Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen
and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual
expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery."
'a country' can print money...mr micawber cannot...
when 'a country' can't pay its bills, it can tax by main
force mr micawber...like take his house or his chickens...
when mr micawber cannot both buy his food and pay
'the government'/country...and 'the country' has all
the guns, mr micawber may well starve unto death...
that's why socialists take your guns away...
the economics of mr micawber don't work the same way
as the economics of 'the country'
Correct, but it's a currency issue. We buy imports with Pounds, because
we're not allowed to print the currency of any other country. What do
the foreign countries buy with those Pounds? Our exports, to some
extent, but what about all the excess Pounds? The 'balance of payments'
worth of Pounds every year? How many foreigners/countries will want to
keep large reserves of Pounds? What can they be spent on?
Nothing really, other than physical bits of the UK. So we're selling
land and houses and businesses to foreigners to soak up their Pounds.
For how long is that sustainable?
all reasonable...
but the more pounds we print the less each pound will buy unless
'production'(desired objects grow)
...then there is immigration balance...there is more complexity
in a national account than in a household thatcher notwithstanding

with the above house prices rise...

if forriners buy 'too much' of britain i'm sure government will
steal the stuff back...and call it sommat like 'nationalisation'

meanwhile individuals and countries hoard cash for various reason
of which you are doubtless aware

ps, i'm gratified to see housing rising .9% in today's figures..i hope
it is meaningful and a trend
--
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Mr. B1ack
2018-08-11 06:03:30 UTC
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I think you are over-techniccallizing ....

Think of this as a kind of war - one for Britain's long-term
future.

Your foes WILL inflict some damage - intent on ruining
your will to fight.

To win you must ignore these minor wounds and push
ahead, undeterred, unafraid.

So FUCK the pound falling a bit .... the rewards for
perseverence will more than make up for it.
tim...
2018-08-09 12:40:50 UTC
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Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter.
there's something strange going on here

The Netherlands, with a quarter of the population of the UK, exports 50%
more by value.

If it was as simple as exports equates directly to the wealth of the country
(as some on this group keep on trying to imply when they make comments such
as "the UK needs an income to buy the goods that we import" - a reference to
the exports we will, it is claimed, lose by leaving the EU) then NL citizens
would be much much much richer than UK citizens.

but they are not, they are just a mediumish amount richer.

So this particular statistic can't be anywhere near as important, as some
are making it out to be

tim
abelard
2018-08-09 12:56:23 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter.
there's something strange going on here
The Netherlands, with a quarter of the population of the UK, exports 50%
more by value.
If it was as simple as exports equates directly to the wealth of the country
(as some on this group keep on trying to imply when they make comments such
as "the UK needs an income to buy the goods that we import" - a reference to
the exports we will, it is claimed, lose by leaving the EU) then NL citizens
would be much much much richer than UK citizens.
but they are not, they are just a mediumish amount richer.
So this particular statistic can't be anywhere near as important, as some
are making it out to be
holland does much intermediation trade through amsterdam...

they count that as exports whereas in facti it is merely in transit

most trade is between individuals....it is little concern to
government
if an individual wants a good and pays for it, why should it
be a matter for government

of course government does tend to try to interfere in all
relationships especially if it can tax it
--
www.abelard.org
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-08-09 14:26:00 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter.
there's something strange going on here
The Netherlands, with a quarter of the population of the UK, exports 50%
more by value.
If it was as simple as exports equates directly to the wealth of the country
(as some on this group keep on trying to imply when they make comments such
as "the UK needs an income to buy the goods that we import" - a reference to
the exports we will, it is claimed, lose by leaving the EU) then NL citizens
would be much much much richer than UK citizens.
but they are not, they are just a mediumish amount richer.
But still richer.

Maybe they import a lot.
Post by tim...
So this particular statistic can't be anywhere near as important, as some
are making it out to be
tim
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-09 17:44:30 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter.
there's something strange going on here
The Netherlands, with a quarter of the population of the UK, exports 50%
more by value.
If it was as simple as exports equates directly to the wealth of the country
(as some on this group keep on trying to imply when they make comments such
as "the UK needs an income to buy the goods that we import" - a reference to
the exports we will, it is claimed, lose by leaving the EU) then NL citizens
would be much much much richer than UK citizens.
but they are not, they are just a mediumish amount richer.
So this particular statistic can't be anywhere near as important, as some
are making it out to be
tim
I think you are looking only at goods. The UK has a big surplus on services like insurance, banking etc.
tim...
2018-08-10 06:21:11 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by tim...
Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter.
there's something strange going on here
The Netherlands, with a quarter of the population of the UK, exports 50%
more by value.
If it was as simple as exports equates directly to the wealth of the country
(as some on this group keep on trying to imply when they make comments such
as "the UK needs an income to buy the goods that we import" - a reference to
the exports we will, it is claimed, lose by leaving the EU) then NL citizens
would be much much much richer than UK citizens.
but they are not, they are just a mediumish amount richer.
So this particular statistic can't be anywhere near as important, as some
are making it out to be
tim
I think you are looking only at goods.
I dunno

I tried to find out if the figures included services or not, and I failed

but in any case it wasn't me

It was Colin who brought the statistic to the table
Post by R. Mark Clayton
The UK has a big surplus on services like insurance, banking etc.
Any surplus (or not) is irrelevant to this disunion. We are currently only
concerned about absolute value of exports (and by extension how competitive
the UK is on the world market at selling things).

tim
Nightjar
2018-08-10 07:58:11 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Nightjar
...
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters...
The UK is the fourth largest importer in the world, but only the 10th
largest exporter.
there's something strange going on here
The Netherlands, with a quarter of the population of the UK, exports 50%
more by value.
If it was as simple as exports equates directly to the wealth of the
country (as some on this group keep on trying to imply when they make
comments such as "the UK needs an income to buy the goods that we
import" - a reference to the exports we will, it is claimed, lose by
leaving the EU) then NL citizens would be much much much richer than UK
citizens.
but they are not, they are just a mediumish amount richer.
So this particular statistic can't be anywhere near as important, as
some are making it out to be
If you are considering wealth creation, then it is a reat deal more
complicated than exports versus imports. If you are looking at whether a
weak pound is good or bad for the UK's international trade, it isn't.
--
--

Colin Bignell
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-09 17:36:07 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
"Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
against the yen and Swiss franc.
"Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
"On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
"The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
pushes up the value of sterling.
"Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
That was me and it was anything but gleeful to see how Brexit is damaging this country and its currency.
Post by Norman Wells
Didn't happen, did it?
Not yet, but as the prospect of the isolationist little Englanders getting their desired hard Brexit looms larger it is heading that way.
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters.
Primary producers principally, mind you come hard Brexit these will be the ones worst hit by tariffs.
Post by Norman Wells
It's only willy-waving to want it higher.
Oh and 60+ Million consumers who don't want to pay more in the shops.
Norman Wells
2018-08-09 17:56:48 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
That was me and it was anything but gleeful to see how Brexit is damaging this country and its currency.
Post by Norman Wells
Didn't happen, did it?
Not yet, but as the prospect of the isolationist little Englanders getting their desired hard Brexit looms larger it is heading that way.
So, you don't think that's factored in already then?

Why not?

How on earth do you think the exchange rate is set? And why do you
think those who set it haven't seen any news for the last 6 months?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters.
Primary producers principally, mind you come hard Brexit these will be the ones worst hit by tariffs.
Post by Norman Wells
It's only willy-waving to want it higher.
Oh and 60+ Million consumers who don't want to pay more in the shops.
Tell us what the exchange rate should be then, and why.
R. Mark Clayton
2018-08-09 18:04:43 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
(But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return €1.11?)
I remember when you were gleefully forecasting parity with the Euro as a
result of the Brexit referendum.
That was me and it was anything but gleeful to see how Brexit is damaging this country and its currency.
Post by Norman Wells
Didn't happen, did it?
Not yet, but as the prospect of the isolationist little Englanders getting their desired hard Brexit looms larger it is heading that way.
So, you don't think that's factored in already then?
I has been factored in since ten minutes after the leave vote was declared (10% down exactly as I predicted).

It then got worse, but recovered when it started looking like there might be a sensible solution. It also recovered against the dollar, due to Donald's Tantrumps hurting the dollar.
Post by Norman Wells
Why not?
Now that the trade minister is saying it is odds against a sensible outcome the market is again factoring in the 6 - 9% relative hit on the economy and the have marked the pound down accordingly.
Post by Norman Wells
How on earth do you think the exchange rate is set? And why do you
think those who set it haven't seen any news for the last 6 months?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters.
Primary producers principally, mind you come hard Brexit these will be the ones worst hit by tariffs.
Post by Norman Wells
It's only willy-waving to want it higher.
Oh and 60+ Million consumers who don't want to pay more in the shops.
Tell us what the exchange rate should be then, and why.
About where it was before all this Leave nonsense.
Norman Wells
2018-08-09 19:24:25 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
How on earth do you think the exchange rate is set? And why do you
think those who set it haven't seen any news for the last 6 months?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, a lower pound is a great boon to all our exporters.
Primary producers principally, mind you come hard Brexit these will be the ones worst hit by tariffs.
Post by Norman Wells
It's only willy-waving to want it higher.
Oh and 60+ Million consumers who don't want to pay more in the shops.
Tell us what the exchange rate should be then, and why.
About where it was before all this Leave nonsense.
Why? What made that 'right'?
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 19:42:28 UTC
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So the UK can not stand on it own.

Some country should just annex it and be done with it.



"MM" <***@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
: on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
:
: "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
: against the yen and Swiss franc.
:
: "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
: no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
:
: "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
: 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
:
: "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
: pushes up the value of sterling.
:
: "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
: the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
:
: But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
:
: (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return ?1.11?)
:
: MM
p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
2018-08-08 20:23:55 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 15:42:28 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
Post by BurfordTJustice
So the UK can not stand on it own.
Some country should just annex it and be done with it.
Yeah, like name a country that could do that.
Post by BurfordTJustice
: "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
: on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
: "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
: against the yen and Swiss franc.
: "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
: no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
: "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
: 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
: "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
: pushes up the value of sterling.
: "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
: the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
: But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
: (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return ?1.11?)
: MM
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abelard
2018-08-08 20:29:52 UTC
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On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 21:23:55 +0100, "p-0''0-h the cat (coder)"
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 15:42:28 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
Post by BurfordTJustice
So the UK can not stand on it own.
Some country should just annex it and be done with it.
Yeah, like name a country that could do that.
the eussr with the assistance of the likes of bliar
--
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p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
2018-08-08 21:16:40 UTC
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Post by abelard
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 21:23:55 +0100, "p-0''0-h the cat (coder)"
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 15:42:28 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
Post by BurfordTJustice
So the UK can not stand on it own.
Some country should just annex it and be done with it.
Yeah, like name a country that could do that.
the eussr with the assistance of the likes of bliar
Is that a country. I've never heard of them. If you are talking about
Russia then may I remind you that we are a nuclear power and we have a
treaty with France who also are a nuclear power so annexation is
extremely unlikely.

I'm told the Yanks also have our back but as we know they are unlikely
to turn up for a couple of years somewhat after all the bombs have
dropped and then just so they can bore us for hundreds of years about
how they saved us. Gawd, it's better to be blown to fuck than having to
watch anymore of those Hollywood movies full of little short guys
straddling around like they are imagining they're a dog with two cocks
and enormous balls. What is that all about. I also like the puffy chest
thing with arms hanging wide like a monkey.

Sent from my iFurryUnderbelly.
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abelard
2018-08-08 22:50:42 UTC
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On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 22:16:40 +0100, "p-0''0-h the cat (coder)"
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
Post by abelard
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 21:23:55 +0100, "p-0''0-h the cat (coder)"
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 15:42:28 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
Post by BurfordTJustice
So the UK can not stand on it own.
Some country should just annex it and be done with it.
Yeah, like name a country that could do that.
the eussr with the assistance of the likes of bliar
Is that a country.
it clearly wants to be
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
I've never heard of them.
not a problem to me
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
If you are talking about
Russia then may I remind you that we are a nuclear power and we have a
treaty with France who also are a nuclear power so annexation is
extremely unlikely.
it is more likely that the eussr will buy russia from the kleptocrats
should the price be right
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
I'm told the Yanks also have our back but as we know they are unlikely
to turn up for a couple of years somewhat after all the bombs have
dropped and then just so they can bore us for hundreds of years about
how they saved us. Gawd, it's better to be blown to fuck than having to
watch anymore of those Hollywood movies full of little short guys
straddling around like they are imagining they're a dog with two cocks
and enormous balls. What is that all about. I also like the puffy chest
thing with arms hanging wide like a monkey.
a plausible plot for an ealing comedy or a hollywood
ball bust errr

if you don't want to be saved by hollywood, that's your
choice and privilege...i'd rather be saved by uncle sam
than by the kaiser
--
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rbowman
2018-08-09 02:59:54 UTC
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Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
Is that a country. I've never heard of them. If you are talking about
Russia then may I remind you that we are a nuclear power and we have a
treaty with France who also are a nuclear power so annexation is
extremely unlikely.
You really think the French have your backs? They still remember when
the BEF cut and ran.
abelard
2018-08-09 10:27:34 UTC
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Post by rbowman
Post by p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
Is that a country. I've never heard of them. If you are talking about
Russia then may I remind you that we are a nuclear power and we have a
treaty with France who also are a nuclear power so annexation is
extremely unlikely.
You really think the French have your backs? They still remember when
the BEF cut and ran.
by declaring paris an open city? and then every town
over 20,000?
or refusing to sail their very large fleet to the uk or
even a neutral port like the usa?
by refusing to set up bastions in the likes of brittany
or algeria?

so you're another one who doesn't know the history...
that is sad, i thought you had more sense than that
--
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BurfordTJustice
2018-08-08 20:32:09 UTC
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Germany, they are already in charge.



"p-0''0-h the cat (coder)" <***@fluffyunderbelly.invalid> wrote in
message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 15:42:28 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
: <burford/***@uk.MI15> wrote:
:
: >So the UK can not stand on it own.
: >
: >Some country should just annex it and be done with it.
:
: Yeah, like name a country that could do that.
:
:
:
: >"MM" <***@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
: >news:***@4ax.com...
: >: "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
: >: on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
: >:
: >: "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
: >: against the yen and Swiss franc.
: >:
: >: "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
: >: no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
: >:
: >: "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
: >: 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
: >:
: >: "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
: >: pushes up the value of sterling.
: >:
: >: "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
: >: the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
: >: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
: >:
: >: But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
: >:
: >: (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return ?1.11?)
: >:
: >: MM
: >
:
: Sent from my iFurryUnderbelly.
:
: --
: p-0.0-h the cat
:
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p-0''0-h the cat (coder)
2018-08-08 21:19:35 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 16:32:09 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
Post by BurfordTJustice
Germany, they are already in charge.
What, does diddums think they have a war machine that even remotely
matches ours. Do you have a vacuum between your ears?
Post by BurfordTJustice
: On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 15:42:28 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
: >So the UK can not stand on it own.
: >
: >Some country should just annex it and be done with it.
: Yeah, like name a country that could do that.
: >: "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year
: >: on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade deal.
: >: "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
: >: against the yen and Swiss franc.
: >: "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of a
: >: no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
: >: "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
: >: 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
: >: "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
: >: pushes up the value of sterling.
: >: "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
: >: the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
: >: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
: >: But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
: >: (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return ?1.11?)
: >: MM
: >
: Sent from my iFurryUnderbelly.
: --
: p-0.0-h the cat
: Internet Terrorist, Mass sock puppeteer, Agent provocateur, Gutter rat,
: Devil incarnate, Linux user#666, BaStarD hacker, Resident evil, Monkey
Boy,
: Certifiable criminal, Spineless cowardly scum, textbook Psychopath,
: the SCOURGE, l33t p00h d3 tr0ll, p00h == lam3r, p00h == tr0ll, troll
infâme,
: the OVERCAT [The BEARPAIR are dead, and we are its murderers], lowlife
troll,
: shyster [pending approval by STATE_TERROR], cripple, sociopath, kook,
: smug prick, smartarse, arsehole, moron, idiot, imbecile, snittish scumbag,
: liar, total ******* retard, shill, pooh-seur, scouringerer, jumped up
chav,
: punk ass dole whore troll, religious maniac, lycanthropic schizotypal
lesbian,
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: NewsGroups Numbrer One Terrorist
: Honorary SHYSTER and FRAUD awarded for services to Haberdashery.
: By Appointment to God Frank-Lin.
: Signature integrity check
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: I mark any message from »Q« the troll as stinky
Sent from my iFurryUnderbelly.
--
p-0.0-h the cat

Internet Terrorist, Mass sock puppeteer, Agent provocateur, Gutter rat,
Devil incarnate, Linux user#666, BaStarD hacker, Resident evil, Monkey Boy,
Certifiable criminal, Spineless cowardly scum, textbook Psychopath,
the SCOURGE, l33t p00h d3 tr0ll, p00h == lam3r, p00h == tr0ll, troll infâme,
the OVERCAT [The BEARPAIR are dead, and we are its murderers], lowlife troll,
shyster [pending approval by STATE_TERROR], cripple, sociopath, kook,
smug prick, smartarse, arsehole, moron, idiot, imbecile, snittish scumbag,
liar, total ******* retard, shill, pooh-seur, scouringerer, jumped up chav,
punk ass dole whore troll, religious maniac, lycanthropic schizotypal lesbian,
the most complete ignoid, joker, and furball.

NewsGroups Numbrer One Terrorist

Honorary SHYSTER and FRAUD awarded for services to Haberdashery.
By Appointment to God Frank-Lin.

Signature integrity check
md5 Checksum: be0b2a8c486d83ce7db9a459b26c4896

I mark any message from »Q« the troll as stinky
BurfordTJustice
2018-08-09 09:58:42 UTC
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The lost empire has no modern day war machine.




"p-0''0-h the cat (coder)" <***@fluffyunderbelly.invalid> wrote in
message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 16:32:09 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
: <burford/***@uk.MI15> wrote:
:
: >Germany, they are already in charge.
:
: What, does diddums think they have a war machine that even remotely
: matches ours. Do you have a vacuum between your ears?
:
:
:
: >"p-0''0-h the cat (coder)" <***@fluffyunderbelly.invalid> wrote in
: >message news:***@4ax.com...
: >: On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 15:42:28 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
: >: <burford/***@uk.MI15> wrote:
: >:
: >: >So the UK can not stand on it own.
: >: >
: >: >Some country should just annex it and be done with it.
: >:
: >: Yeah, like name a country that could do that.
: >:
: >:
: >:
: >: >"MM" <***@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
: >: >news:***@4ax.com...
: >: >: "The pound has fallen below $1.29 for the first time in almost a
year
: >: >: on continuing worries Britain will leave the EU without a trade
deal.
: >: >:
: >: >: "Sterling also hit a nine-month low against the euro, and was down
: >: >: against the yen and Swiss franc.
: >: >:
: >: >: "Bank of England governor Mark Carney said on Friday the chances of
a
: >: >: no-deal Brexit were 'uncomfortably high'.
: >: >:
: >: >: "On Sunday, international trade secretary Liam Fox put the odds at
: >: >: 'certainly not much more than 60-40'.
: >: >:
: >: >: "The falls come despite a rise in UK interest rates, which usually
: >: >: pushes up the value of sterling.
: >: >:
: >: >: "Since the beginning of the month, the pound has fallen 1.7% against
: >: >: the dollar and 0.8% against the euro."
: >: >: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45113862
: >: >:
: >: >: But hey, Brexiters! This is all fake news, right?
: >: >:
: >: >: (But why then does my Google for "sterling v euro" return ?1.11?)
: >: >:
: >: >: MM
: >: >
: >:
: >: Sent from my iFurryUnderbelly.
: >:
: >: --
: >: p-0.0-h the cat
: >:
: >: Internet Terrorist, Mass sock puppeteer, Agent provocateur, Gutter rat,
: >: Devil incarnate, Linux user#666, BaStarD hacker, Resident evil, Monkey
: >Boy,
: >: Certifiable criminal, Spineless cowardly scum, textbook Psychopath,
: >: the SCOURGE, l33t p00h d3 tr0ll, p00h == lam3r, p00h == tr0ll, troll
: >infâme,
: >: the OVERCAT [The BEARPAIR are dead, and we are its murderers], lowlife
: >troll,
: >: shyster [pending approval by STATE_TERROR], cripple, sociopath, kook,
: >: smug prick, smartarse, arsehole, moron, idiot, imbecile, snittish
scumbag,
: >: liar, total ******* retard, shill, pooh-seur, scouringerer, jumped up
: >chav,
: >: punk ass dole whore troll, religious maniac, lycanthropic schizotypal
: >lesbian,
: >: the most complete ignoid, joker, and furball.
: >:
: >: NewsGroups Numbrer One Terrorist
: >:
: >: Honorary SHYSTER and FRAUD awarded for services to Haberdashery.
: >: By Appointment to God Frank-Lin.
: >:
: >: Signature integrity check
: >: md5 Checksum: be0b2a8c486d83ce7db9a459b26c4896
: >:
: >: I mark any message from »Q« the troll as stinky
: >:
: >
:
: Sent from my iFurryUnderbelly.
:
: --
: p-0.0-h the cat
:
: Internet Terrorist, Mass sock puppeteer, Agent provocateur, Gutter rat,
: Devil incarnate, Linux user#666, BaStarD hacker, Resident evil, Monkey
Boy,
: Certifiable criminal, Spineless cowardly scum, textbook Psychopath,
: the SCOURGE, l33t p00h d3 tr0ll, p00h == lam3r, p00h == tr0ll, troll
infâme,
: the OVERCAT [The BEARPAIR are dead, and we are its murderers], lowlife
troll,
: shyster [pending approval by STATE_TERROR], cripple, sociopath, kook,
: smug prick, smartarse, arsehole, moron, idiot, imbecile, snittish scumbag,
: liar, total ******* retard, shill, pooh-seur, scouringerer, jumped up
chav,
: punk ass dole whore troll, religious maniac, lycanthropic schizotypal
lesbian,
: the most complete ignoid, joker, and furball.
:
: NewsGroups Numbrer One Terrorist
:
: Honorary SHYSTER and FRAUD awarded for services to Haberdashery.
: By Appointment to God Frank-Lin.
:
: Signature integrity check
: md5 Checksum: be0b2a8c486d83ce7db9a459b26c4896
:
: I mark any message from »Q« the troll as stinky
:
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