Discussion:
Brexiters nowhere to be seen as UK raises white flag over EU divorce bill
Add Reply
MM
2017-11-29 18:29:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"

"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.

"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.

"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.

"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."

More at:
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill

But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.

MM
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 19:04:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.

If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.

At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
Pelican
2017-11-29 19:17:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.

All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 19:38:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.

Time to negotiate I think.
Pelican
2017-11-29 19:55:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman. There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer. The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 20:42:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to get
what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer.  The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.

Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.

If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal. Similarly, if the deal
is not good for us, they won't have a deal.

It's the very essence of negotiation.
Pelican
2017-11-29 20:57:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to get
what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer.  The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal.  Similarly, if the deal
is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.

Time is running. If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit. That's the prospect for the UK.
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 21:13:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to get
what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer.  The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal.  Similarly, if the
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running.  If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit.  That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.

And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Pelican
2017-11-29 21:18:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to get
what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer.  The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal.  Similarly, if the
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running.  If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit.  That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Sure. Your position is quite straight-forward. You want the UK out of
the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about any
down-side. Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 21:31:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to get
what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer.  The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal.  Similarly, if the
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running.  If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit.  That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Sure.  Your position is quite straight-forward.  You want the UK out of
the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about any
down-side.  Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal. The EU's
attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's revealed itself to
be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent organisation that is almost
impossible to deal with. It's hardened my view that we would be much
better out of it and that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial. I
would think I'm not alone either.
Pelican
2017-11-29 21:40:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to
get what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to anything
you would prefer.  The EU was clear about that immediately after
the referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal.  Similarly, if the
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running.  If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit.  That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Sure.  Your position is quite straight-forward.  You want the UK out
of the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about any
down-side.  Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal.
Bad luck, Norman. The only deal going, from the time that the outcome
of the vote was known, was what the EU was prepared to offer. Don't
like it? Get over it, Norman.
Post by Norman Wells
  The EU's
attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's revealed itself to
be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent organisation that is almost
impossible to deal with.  It's hardened my view that we would be much
better out of it and that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial.  I
would think I'm not alone either.
Sure. As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and the EU
and the rest of the world knows it.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-29 21:47:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret finan=
cial
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering articl=
e 50"
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet=E2=80=
=99s
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it=
was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain=E2=80=99=
s expensive
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave=
the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50=
in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us=
'.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings o=
f the
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still call=
ed
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on=
British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless fo=
r six
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 10=
0
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in=
a
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. Aft=
er
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter o=
f
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
hours,
the EU=E2=80=99s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called ti=
me and
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would mis=
s any
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-w=
hite-flag-eu-divorce-bill
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than =C2=A320bn=
. A lot
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears=
.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to
get what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman. There is to be no negotiation to anything
you would prefer. The EU was clear about that immediately after=
the referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal. Similarly, if t=
he
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running. If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard=
Brexit. That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide =
us
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
over.
Sure. Your position is quite straight-forward. You want the UK out=
of the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about any
down-side. Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal.
Bad luck, Norman. The only deal going, from the time that the outcome=
of the vote was known, was what the EU was prepared to offer. Don't
like it? Get over it, Norman.
Post by Norman Wells
The EU's
attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's revealed itself t=
o
Post by Norman Wells
be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent organisation that is alm=
ost
Post by Norman Wells
impossible to deal with. It's hardened my view that we would be much=
better out of it and that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial. I
would think I'm not alone either.
Sure. As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and the E=
U
and the rest of the world knows it.
No, it's based on the EU revealing itself to be a bigger bunch of losers=
than we previously thought. The EU is panicking over losing our fundin=
g. They will be far worse off without the UK to help them out. More co=
untries will follow, and the EU will become noting but a bunch of pathet=
ic loser countries who were previously sponging off everyone else.

-- =

Dancing cheektocheek is really a form of floor play.
Pelican
2017-11-29 21:59:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:40:14 -0000, Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms
demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on
Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50
in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a
Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never going to
get what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to anything
you would prefer.  The EU was clear about that immediately after
the referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal.  Similarly, if the
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running.  If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit.  That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Sure.  Your position is quite straight-forward.  You want the UK out
of the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about any
down-side.  Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal.
Bad luck, Norman.  The only deal going, from the time that the outcome
of the vote was known, was what the EU was prepared to offer.  Don't
like it?  Get over it, Norman.
Post by Norman Wells
 The EU's
attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's revealed itself to
be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent organisation that is almost
impossible to deal with.  It's hardened my view that we would be much
better out of it and that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial.  I
would think I'm not alone either.
Sure.  As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and the EU
and the rest of the world knows it.
No, it's based on the EU revealing itself to be a bigger bunch of losers
than we previously thought.  The EU is panicking over losing our
funding.  They will be far worse off without the UK to help them out.
More countries will follow, and the EU will become noting but a bunch of
pathetic loser countries who were previously sponging off everyone else.
Well, ok. If you want to live in a xenophobic country, who am I to object?
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-29 23:26:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:40:14 -0000, Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet=E2=
=80=99s
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, =
it
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain=E2=80=
=99s
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pa=
ve
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms=
demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement,
which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament o=
n
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the=
start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article =
50
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions an=
d
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to =
us'.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings=
of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still ca=
lled
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue =
on
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to =
100
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents =
in a
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. A=
fter
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter=
of
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
hours,
the EU=E2=80=99s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called =
time and
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a=
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk=
-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than =C2=A320=
bn. A lot
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappea=
rs.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going t=
o
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
get what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.=
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman. There is to be no negotiation to anythin=
g
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
you would prefer. The EU was clear about that immediately aft=
er
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
the referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal. Similarly, if=
the
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running. If there is no "deal", which only means the UK=
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a ha=
rd
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Brexit. That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tid=
e us
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
over.
Sure. Your position is quite straight-forward. You want the UK o=
ut
Post by Norman Wells
of the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about an=
y
Post by Norman Wells
down-side. Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal.
Bad luck, Norman. The only deal going, from the time that the outco=
me
of the vote was known, was what the EU was prepared to offer. Don't=
like it? Get over it, Norman.
Post by Norman Wells
The EU's
attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's revealed itself=
to
Post by Norman Wells
be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent organisation that is a=
lmost
Post by Norman Wells
impossible to deal with. It's hardened my view that we would be mu=
ch
Post by Norman Wells
better out of it and that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial. =
I
Post by Norman Wells
would think I'm not alone either.
Sure. As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and the=
EU
and the rest of the world knows it.
No, it's based on the EU revealing itself to be a bigger bunch of los=
ers
than we previously thought. The EU is panicking over losing our
funding. They will be far worse off without the UK to help them out.=
More countries will follow, and the EU will become noting but a bunch=
of
pathetic loser countries who were previously sponging off everyone el=
se.
Well, ok. If you want to live in a xenophobic country, who am I to ob=
ject?

Xenophobia is a good thing. We are superior, fuck the subhumans.

-- =

A federal survey shows that one in twenty Americans lack basic English s=
kills.
The good news is, even without those skills someone can still become Pre=
sident.
MM
2017-11-30 10:18:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 23:26:15 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Xenophobia is a good thing. We are superior, fuck the subhumans.
You've stolen the Nazis' line! Do you consider Britons to be the
master race?

MM
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-30 16:13:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 23:26:15 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Xenophobia is a good thing. We are superior, fuck the subhumans.
You've stolen the Nazis' line! Do you consider Britons to be the
master race?
No, just caucasians.
--
You need only two tools in life. WD-40 and duck tape.
If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40.
If it moves and shouldn't, use the tape.
The Peeler
2017-11-30 20:49:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 23:26:15 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Xenophobia is a good thing. We are superior, fuck the subhumans.
In fact, YOU are inferior, Birdbrain! Check your long psychiatric record,
you unemployable "permanently ill" workshy wanker!



Some examples of sociopath Peter Hucker's (aka "Birdbrain") sick interaction
with his environment (neighbours, road users, relatives, etc.), as told by
the idiot himself:
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about his neighbours:
"I will not accept money from my neighbours for doing them a favour"
"My neighbour just paid me £40 to brush moss off the roof of her
porch extension. It took me 10 minutes."
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sick sociopathic
world:
"I once collected money for an event that got cancelled. I simply never
told the donaters that it had been."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Wanker Peter Hucker, if he had children:
"If I was a parent I'd deliberately let my brat run amok in shops, hotels,
on the street etc, and when asked why I wasn't controlling it, I'd say "My
hands are tied, I'm not allowed". Since when did our children belong to the
fucking state?!"
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic life:
"I refuse to go back to Tesco after I had a very loud argument with three
managers about whether I could go in shirtless on a baking hot summer's
day."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I saw someone today shovelling his pavement clean, pushing it onto the
road. I waited until he went inside, then drove over the snow fairly
quickly, splattering it back where it was."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) abnormal sociopathic
world:
"However I do like to make fun of people. For example, a professor once
told a secretary off for having a topless male model as the wallpaper on her
computer. So I told her he was a hypocrite, and that he had pictures of
transvestites on his (not as wallpaper, but stored on the hard disk). She
spread that around quite quickly."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from wanker Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange
sociopathic
world:
"I once found some photos of spanking porn on m'colleague's computer at
work. He was a lot nicer to me on threat of grassing him off :-)
But when another one grumbled at our secretary for having a shirtless male
model as her desktop background, I couldn't resist telling her about his
transgender photos. She must have been a right gossip, as quite a few
people looked at him funny for the next month or so."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) about his driving habits (no.2):
"Now you see, the proper way to soak somebody is to aim for the puddle from
100 yards back, then it looks like an accident to any moronic nosy hasn't
got a life cyclist. Of course you must adjust your speed inconspicuously
(use gears not brakes which cause lights to come on...).
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
"thinking":
"I class one human (not an immigrunt, a proper human) as worth the same as
any other. Of course relatives rate higher, but any two strangers are the
same, no matter what age. Unless they're under about 2 years old, then I
don't care at all. I'd put abortion right up to 2 years after birth."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world:
"Around here they like to run in front of cars for a laugh. For some reason
they're surprised when I accelerate."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world he's
living in:
"Criminals should be tortured for the amusement of the rest of us."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) pathological "mind"
revealed:
"I am actually considering crashing deliberately into one of my neighbours.
Three times he's stopped on the wrong side of the road, directly in front of
me, then reversed into his drive. I had to brake hard to avoid a head on
collision. Next time I'll glance at the camera to make sure it's rolling
and carry on."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind":
"Why do people get upset about getting punched on the nose? It's only as bad
as falling off your bike."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
life:
"Because it's fun. I set loads of stuff on fire when I was a kid."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "insights":
"Because punching someone really isn't that serious. Grow up."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind" at work:
"Satan is god's wife. Woman are evil."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"life":
"I have seriously considered poisoning my father"
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
The Peeler
2017-11-29 22:28:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:47:27 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Pelican
Sure. As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and the EU
and the rest of the world knows it.
No, it's based on the EU revealing itself to be a bigger bunch of losers
than we previously thought. The EU is panicking over losing our funding.
They will be far worse off without the UK to help them out. More
countries will follow, and the EU will become noting but a bunch of
pathetic loser countries who were previously sponging off everyone else.
Turned prophet now, you retarded piece of Scottish shite? <VBG>

Some examples of sociopath Peter Hucker's (aka "Birdbrain") sick interaction
with his environment (neighbours, road users, relatives, etc.), as told by
the idiot himself:
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about his neighbours:
"I will not accept money from my neighbours for doing them a favour"
"My neighbour just paid me £40 to brush moss off the roof of her
porch extension. It took me 10 minutes."
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sick sociopathic
world:
"I once collected money for an event that got cancelled. I simply never
told the donaters that it had been."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Wanker Peter Hucker, if he had children:
"If I was a parent I'd deliberately let my brat run amok in shops, hotels,
on the street etc, and when asked why I wasn't controlling it, I'd say "My
hands are tied, I'm not allowed". Since when did our children belong to the
fucking state?!"
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic life:
"I refuse to go back to Tesco after I had a very loud argument with three
managers about whether I could go in shirtless on a baking hot summer's
day."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I saw someone today shovelling his pavement clean, pushing it onto the
road. I waited until he went inside, then drove over the snow fairly
quickly, splattering it back where it was."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) abnormal sociopathic
world:
"However I do like to make fun of people. For example, a professor once
told a secretary off for having a topless male model as the wallpaper on her
computer. So I told her he was a hypocrite, and that he had pictures of
transvestites on his (not as wallpaper, but stored on the hard disk). She
spread that around quite quickly."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from wanker Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange
sociopathic
world:
"I once found some photos of spanking porn on m'colleague's computer at
work. He was a lot nicer to me on threat of grassing him off :-)
But when another one grumbled at our secretary for having a shirtless male
model as her desktop background, I couldn't resist telling her about his
transgender photos. She must have been a right gossip, as quite a few
people looked at him funny for the next month or so."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) about his driving habits (no.2):
"Now you see, the proper way to soak somebody is to aim for the puddle from
100 yards back, then it looks like an accident to any moronic nosy hasn't
got a life cyclist. Of course you must adjust your speed inconspicuously
(use gears not brakes which cause lights to come on...).
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
"thinking":
"I class one human (not an immigrunt, a proper human) as worth the same as
any other. Of course relatives rate higher, but any two strangers are the
same, no matter what age. Unless they're under about 2 years old, then I
don't care at all. I'd put abortion right up to 2 years after birth."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world:
"Around here they like to run in front of cars for a laugh. For some reason
they're surprised when I accelerate."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world he's
living in:
"Criminals should be tortured for the amusement of the rest of us."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) pathological "mind"
revealed:
"I am actually considering crashing deliberately into one of my neighbours.
Three times he's stopped on the wrong side of the road, directly in front of
me, then reversed into his drive. I had to brake hard to avoid a head on
collision. Next time I'll glance at the camera to make sure it's rolling
and carry on."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind":
"Why do people get upset about getting punched on the nose? It's only as bad
as falling off your bike."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
life:
"Because it's fun. I set loads of stuff on fire when I was a kid."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "insights":
"Because punching someone really isn't that serious. Grow up."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind" at work:
"Satan is god's wife. Woman are evil."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"life":
"I have seriously considered poisoning my father"
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Yellow
2017-11-30 00:19:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 08:40:14 +1100, Pelican <water-
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal.
Bad luck, Norman. The only deal going, from the time that the outcome
of the vote was known, was what the EU was prepared to offer. Don't
like it? Get over it, Norman.
Post by Norman Wells
  The EU's
attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's revealed itself to
be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent organisation that is almost
impossible to deal with.  It's hardened my view that we would be much
better out of it and that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial.  I
would think I'm not alone either.
Sure. As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and the EU
and the rest of the world knows it.
Really? Is that it? "You are a racist you are". That is your punchline.

You may not agree with people wanting to leave the EU but still coming
out with that nonsense just adds to my opinion that we really do just
need to leave. Why? Because while people share your view of people who
do not share your EU vision, we will never get a look in when it comes
to the serious reform that would be required to make the organisation
palatable to us.

Dismissing our views on the EU, because we are 'racist' or 'stupid' or
'ill-educated' or 'old' or whatever, is how we got here because if you
you are not prepared to see the other point of view, or even acknowledge
that other valid views can exist, then there can be no middle ground.
abelard
2017-11-30 10:53:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 08:40:14 +1100, Pelican <water-
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal.
Bad luck, Norman. The only deal going, from the time that the outcome
of the vote was known, was what the EU was prepared to offer. Don't
like it? Get over it, Norman.
Post by Norman Wells
  The EU's
attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's revealed itself to
be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent organisation that is almost
impossible to deal with.  It's hardened my view that we would be much
better out of it and that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial.  I
would think I'm not alone either.
Sure. As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and the EU
and the rest of the world knows it.
Really? Is that it? "You are a racist you are". That is your punchline.
You may not agree with people wanting to leave the EU but still coming
out with that nonsense just adds to my opinion that we really do just
need to leave. Why? Because while people share your view of people who
do not share your EU vision, we will never get a look in when it comes
to the serious reform that would be required to make the organisation
palatable to us.
Dismissing our views on the EU, because we are 'racist' or 'stupid' or
'ill-educated' or 'old' or whatever, is how we got here because if you
you are not prepared to see the other point of view, or even acknowledge
that other valid views can exist, then there can be no middle ground.
socialists are not seeking common ground...they are seeking
a one party state controlled by their shallow religion

you don't seek common ground with islam...you convert...
.....or else
--
www.abelard.org
kat
2017-11-30 11:16:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
You may not agree with people wanting to leave the EU but still coming
out with that nonsense just adds to my opinion that we really do just
need to leave. Why? Because while people share your view of people who
do not share your EU vision, we will never get a look in when it comes
to the serious reform that would be required to make the organisation
palatable to us.
Dismissing our views on the EU, because we are 'racist' or 'stupid' or
'ill-educated' or 'old' or whatever, is how we got here because if you
you are not prepared to see the other point of view, or even acknowledge
that other valid views can exist, then there can be no middle ground.
I think this is exactly right. Ignoring the concerns of ordinary
people, dismissing them in these negative ways, will have driven them to
vote to Leave, when many might have quite liked to stay in, had there
been evidence that they were being heard sympathetically.
--
kat
Post by Yellow
^..^<
pamela
2017-11-30 12:37:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret
financial settlement in stark contrast to bombast of
triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the
cabinet’s swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be
seen. Instead, it was left to civil servants to hammer
out the terms of Britain’s expensive retreat from
the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the
way for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely
on terms demanded by Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial
settlement, which were not even officially confirmed
by ministers in parliament on Wednesday, are a far cry
from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked
article 50 in March, she boasted that it was time to
'make our own decisions and our own laws... to take
control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile
surroundings of the Berlaymont building, the
headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who
still called the shots, to the point of vetoing
attempts to vary the venue on British turf
occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up
nonetheless for six increasingly tetchy rounds of
talks, accompanied by up to 100 British officials at a
time and reportedly carrying his documents in a
Faraday cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic
snooping. After the final such encounter, which shrunk
from a week to a matter of hours, the EU’s chief
negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or
would miss any chance to give British business some
breathing room with a transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than
£20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot
disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality.  The UK was never
going to get what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued
an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman.  There is to be no negotiation to
anything you would prefer.  The EU was clear about that
immediately after the referendum, and nothing has changed
in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal. 
Similarly, if the deal is not good for us, they won't have
a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running.  If there is no "deal", which only means
the UK agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly
called a hard Brexit.  That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Sure.  Your position is quite straight-forward.  You want
the UK out of the EU, as soon as possible, and you really
don't care about any down-side.  Which was the view of most
Brexit voters.
No, I would much prefer a sensible, mutually beneficial deal.
Bad luck, Norman. The only deal going, from the time that the
outcome of the vote was known, was what the EU was prepared to
offer. Don't like it? Get over it, Norman.
You're wasting your time. Norman is like some old codger firmly
clinging to outdated ideas. He won't see an alternative point of
view even when its clearly explained.
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
The EU's attitude has been so negative so far, however, it's
revealed itself to be a pretty awful, arrogant and intransigent
organisation that is almost impossible to deal with.  It's
hardened my view that we would be much better out of it and
that even a hard Brexit might be beneficial.  I would think
I'm not alone either.
Sure. As I mentioned, your position is based on xenophobia, and
the EU and the rest of the world knows it.
finally ditched mimo
2017-11-29 21:59:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was
left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the
way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms
demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which
were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on
Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in
March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on
British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100
British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a
Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of
hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag
-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot
more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get
what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman. There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer. The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal. Similarly, if the
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running. If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit. That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Sure. Your position is quite straight-forward. You want the UK out of
the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about any
down-side. Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
What down-side?

Oh you mean the predictions of doom and gloom from the pissed off remain
media outlets and their stooges?

Those same predictions which have so far not only failed to materialised, but
have been shown to be the opposite of what has actually happened.

And now, everything bad is being blamed on Brexit because the predictions
have all gone belly-up. We have even been told that because of Brexit the
price of this years Christmas dinner is going to be xx% more expensive than
2016.

Well of course; yes because of the fall in value of the £, all those items
for dinner that we have to import because we cannot produce them ourselves -
such as sprouts, carrots, potatoes, turkeys, chickens, sausages, bacon, herbs
for stuffing, etc. will cost more because of the fall in sterling.

Yeah right.

If the remainers actually cut the bullshit, maybe brexiteers would be less
inclined to dig their heels in so hard.
Pelican
2017-11-29 22:08:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag
-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get
what it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
Then the EU won't get its carrot.
Time to negotiate I think.
Think again, Norman. There is to be no negotiation to anything you
would prefer. The EU was clear about that immediately after the
referendum, and nothing has changed in the EU position.
Then the EU will not get its carrot.
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.
If they don't want a deal, there can be no deal. Similarly, if the
deal is not good for us, they won't have a deal.
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running. If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit. That's the prospect for the UK.
Not necessarily a disaster.
And we'll have the 50 billion whatevers in our own pockets to tide us over.
Sure. Your position is quite straight-forward. You want the UK out of
the EU, as soon as possible, and you really don't care about any
down-side. Which was the view of most Brexit voters.
What down-side?
Oh you mean the predictions of doom and gloom from the pissed off remain
media outlets and their stooges?
Those same predictions which have so far not only failed to materialised, but
have been shown to be the opposite of what has actually happened.
And now, everything bad is being blamed on Brexit because the predictions
have all gone belly-up. We have even been told that because of Brexit the
price of this years Christmas dinner is going to be xx% more expensive than
2016.
Well of course; yes because of the fall in value of the £, all those items
for dinner that we have to import because we cannot produce them ourselves -
such as sprouts, carrots, potatoes, turkeys, chickens, sausages, bacon, herbs
for stuffing, etc. will cost more because of the fall in sterling.
Yeah right.
If the remainers actually cut the bullshit, maybe brexiteers would be less
inclined to dig their heels in so hard.
Sure. But there is very little that those in the UK who do not want to
leave the EU can say with much hope of being heard. The Brexit vote
turned on xenophobia, not on economic issues. They were never much of a
concern. And nothing has changed.
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 22:49:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Sure.  But there is very little that those in the UK who do not want to
leave the EU can say with much hope of being heard.  The Brexit vote
turned on xenophobia, not on economic issues.
So you say, and so you've doubtless convinced yourself. It's very
convenient for your narrative, and it eases the pain of your losing to
blame it on something unattractive. But it's very simplistic as well as
being unsupported by any convincing evidence.
pamela
2017-11-30 12:06:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
........
What down-side?
Oh you mean the predictions of doom and gloom from the pissed
off remain media outlets and their stooges?
Those same predictions which have so far not only failed to
materialise, but have been shown to be the opposite of what has
actually happened.
And now, everything bad is being blamed on Brexit because the
predictions have all gone belly-up. We have even been told that
because of Brexit the price of this years Christmas dinner is
going to be xx% more expensive than 2016.
The problems of leaving are due to Remainers? lol
Well of course; yes because of the fall in value of the £, all
those items for dinner that we have to import because we cannot
produce them ourselves - such as sprouts, carrots, potatoes,
turkeys, chickens, sausages, bacon, herbs for stuffing, etc.
will cost more because of the fall in sterling.
Don't you realise the list of foods you gave is profundly
unappetising to many people?

What a laughable argument for leaving..... we can only afford the
horrors of traditional British food.

British food is ridiculed the world over.
Yeah right.
If the remainers actually cut the bullshit, maybe brexiteers
would be less inclined to dig their heels in so hard.
Yellow
2017-11-30 00:05:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 07:57:35 +1100, Pelican <water-
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
It's the very essence of negotiation.
You just don't get it, Norman.
Time is running. If there is no "deal", which only means the UK
agreeing with the EU, there will be what is commonly called a hard
Brexit.
Actually, a 'Hard Brexit' is leaving the Single Market and the Customs
Union. I point this out because you seem to be conflating this with 'no
deal'. Not the same thing

And I believe the government position is in fact to have a so called
'Hard Brexit' with a trade deal.
Post by Pelican
That's the prospect for the UK.
A so called 'Hard Brexit' - yes please!

'No deal' - a decent deal would be better so fingers crossed that one
will be agreed but if it isn't then well, it isn't.
finally ditched mimo
2017-11-29 19:45:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-di
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?

Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?

I don’t think so.
Pelican
2017-11-29 19:59:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-di
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Post by finally ditched mimo
I don’t think so.
Of course it is.
finally ditched mimo
2017-11-29 20:45:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-
di
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Post by finally ditched mimo
I don’t think so.
Of course it is.
Your omission (of giving an answer to my question) has been noted.
Pelican
2017-11-29 20:59:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-
di
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Post by finally ditched mimo
I don’t think so.
Of course it is.
Your omission (of giving an answer to my question) has been noted.
The answer to your question is that your premises are incorrect.
MM
2017-11-30 10:25:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 20:45:46 +0000, finally ditched mimo
Post by finally ditched mimo
Your omission (of giving an answer to my question) has been noted.
Then what? "has been noted" by whom, exactly? Who gives a flying fuck
about who might read your comment and be persuaded by it? Who? Tell
us!

MM
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-29 21:48:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet=E2=80=99s=
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was l=
eft
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain=E2=80=99s exp=
ensive
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the w=
ay
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demande=
d by
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which we=
re
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednes=
day,
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start o=
f
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in Ma=
rch,
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our ow=
n
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, =
it
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the=
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on Briti=
sh
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 Brit=
ish
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Far=
aday
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the=
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hour=
s,
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
the EU=E2=80=99s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and=
declared
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-f=
lag-eu-di
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than =C2=A320bn. A lo=
t more.
Post by Norman Wells
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get wha=
t
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now=
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Ger=
many
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associat=
ed jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dr=
y as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampa=
nt
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing=
.

-- =

Do infants have as much fun in their infancy as adults do in adultery?
Pelican
2017-11-29 21:56:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:59:12 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-di
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and
associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
Get thee behind me, Satan!
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-29 23:25:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:59:12 -0000, Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial=
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50=
"
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet=E2=80=99=
s
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was=
left
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain=E2=80=99s e=
xpensive
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the=
way
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which =
were
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start=
of
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our =
own
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of th=
e
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission=
, it
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called t=
he
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on Bri=
tish
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for si=
x
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 Br=
itish
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After t=
he
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of ho=
urs,
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
the EU=E2=80=99s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time a=
nd declared
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss an=
y
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white=
-flag-eu-di
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than =C2=A320bn. A =
lot more.
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get w=
hat
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are n=
ow
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your ram=
pant
Post by Pelican
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad th=
ing.
Post by Pelican
Get thee behind me, Satan!
In English please.

-- =

A federal survey shows that one in twenty Americans lack basic English s=
kills.
The good news is, even without those skills someone can still become Pre=
sident.
Pelican
2017-11-29 23:35:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:56:19 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:59:12 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-di
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
Get thee behind me, Satan!
In English please.
Matthew 16:23 HTH
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-30 16:14:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:56:19 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:59:12 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financi=
al
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article =
50"
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet=E2=80=
=99s
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it w=
as
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain=E2=80=99s=
expensive
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave t=
he
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, whic=
h
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the sta=
rt of
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 i=
n
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and ou=
r own
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.=
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of =
the
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called=
the
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for =
six
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a=
Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After=
the
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU=E2=80=99s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time=
and declared
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss =
any
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-whi=
te-flag-eu-di
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than =C2=A320bn. =
A lot
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get=
what
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and=
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are=
now
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from=
Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the U=
K
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
Get thee behind me, Satan!
In English please.
Matthew 16:23 HTH
You referred to a bible passage, you lose you silly religious nut.

-- =

A penny saved is ridiculous.
The Peeler
2017-11-30 20:50:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:14:39 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Pelican
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Pelican
Get thee behind me, Satan!
In English please.
Matthew 16:23 HTH
You referred to a bible passage, you lose you silly religious nut.
No, you braindead wanker, it's really YOU who just lost again! You are just
too retarded to notice it!

Some examples of sociopath Peter Hucker's (aka "Birdbrain") sick interaction
with his environment (neighbours, road users, relatives, etc.), as told by
the idiot himself:
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about his neighbours:
"I will not accept money from my neighbours for doing them a favour"
"My neighbour just paid me £40 to brush moss off the roof of her
porch extension. It took me 10 minutes."
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sick sociopathic
world:
"I once collected money for an event that got cancelled. I simply never
told the donaters that it had been."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Wanker Peter Hucker, if he had children:
"If I was a parent I'd deliberately let my brat run amok in shops, hotels,
on the street etc, and when asked why I wasn't controlling it, I'd say "My
hands are tied, I'm not allowed". Since when did our children belong to the
fucking state?!"
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic life:
"I refuse to go back to Tesco after I had a very loud argument with three
managers about whether I could go in shirtless on a baking hot summer's
day."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I saw someone today shovelling his pavement clean, pushing it onto the
road. I waited until he went inside, then drove over the snow fairly
quickly, splattering it back where it was."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) abnormal sociopathic
world:
"However I do like to make fun of people. For example, a professor once
told a secretary off for having a topless male model as the wallpaper on her
computer. So I told her he was a hypocrite, and that he had pictures of
transvestites on his (not as wallpaper, but stored on the hard disk). She
spread that around quite quickly."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from wanker Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange
sociopathic
world:
"I once found some photos of spanking porn on m'colleague's computer at
work. He was a lot nicer to me on threat of grassing him off :-)
But when another one grumbled at our secretary for having a shirtless male
model as her desktop background, I couldn't resist telling her about his
transgender photos. She must have been a right gossip, as quite a few
people looked at him funny for the next month or so."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) about his driving habits (no.2):
"Now you see, the proper way to soak somebody is to aim for the puddle from
100 yards back, then it looks like an accident to any moronic nosy hasn't
got a life cyclist. Of course you must adjust your speed inconspicuously
(use gears not brakes which cause lights to come on...).
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
"thinking":
"I class one human (not an immigrunt, a proper human) as worth the same as
any other. Of course relatives rate higher, but any two strangers are the
same, no matter what age. Unless they're under about 2 years old, then I
don't care at all. I'd put abortion right up to 2 years after birth."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world:
"Around here they like to run in front of cars for a laugh. For some reason
they're surprised when I accelerate."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world he's
living in:
"Criminals should be tortured for the amusement of the rest of us."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) pathological "mind"
revealed:
"I am actually considering crashing deliberately into one of my neighbours.
Three times he's stopped on the wrong side of the road, directly in front of
me, then reversed into his drive. I had to brake hard to avoid a head on
collision. Next time I'll glance at the camera to make sure it's rolling
and carry on."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind":
"Why do people get upset about getting punched on the nose? It's only as bad
as falling off your bike."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
life:
"Because it's fun. I set loads of stuff on fire when I was a kid."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "insights":
"Because punching someone really isn't that serious. Grow up."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind" at work:
"Satan is god's wife. Woman are evil."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"life":
"I have seriously considered poisoning my father"
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
Pelican
2017-11-30 21:00:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 23:35:43 -0000, Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:56:19 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:59:12 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by finally ditched mimo
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European
commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-di
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to get what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration and
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who are now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
Get thee behind me, Satan!
In English please.
Matthew 16:23   HTH
You referred to a bible passage, you lose you silly religious nut.
It's a common expression in English, but you didn't understand it. You
now have a reference to its source.

Another was of saying it is "Piss off, fuckwit".

Let me know if you need more butcher's paper and crayons.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-30 21:48:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 23:35:43 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:56:19 -0000, Pelican
Post by Pelican
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:59:12 -0000, Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret finan=
cial
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering articl=
e 50"
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet=E2=80=
=99s
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it=
was
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain=E2=80=99=
s expensive
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave=
the
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, wh=
ich
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50=
in
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us=
'.
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings o=
f the
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still call=
ed
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on=
British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless fo=
r six
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 10=
0
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in=
a
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. Aft=
er
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter o=
f
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
hours,
the EU=E2=80=99s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called ti=
me and
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would mis=
s any
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-w=
hite-flag-eu-di
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
vorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than =C2=A320bn=
. A lot
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears=
.
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Post by Norman Wells
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
As usual, Norman reverses reality. The UK was never going to g=
et
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
what
it wanted on trade. The EU has issued an ultimatim.
All this because people in the UK panicked at EU immigration a=
nd
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
refugees from Syria, fed by xenophobia nutters in the UK who a=
re
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
now
nowhere to be seen.
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import fr=
om
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the=
UK
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your=
rampant
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a ba=
d
Post by Pelican
Post by Pelican
thing.
Get thee behind me, Satan!
In English please.
Matthew 16:23 HTH
You referred to a bible passage, you lose you silly religious nut.
It's a common expression in English, but you didn't understand it. Yo=
u
now have a reference to its source.
Another was of saying it is "Piss off, fuckwit".
Let me know if you need more butcher's paper and crayons.
I'm an atheist, I do not tolerate religious fuckwittery.

-- =

Her voice had that tense grating quality, like a first-generation therma=
l paper fax machine that needed a band tightened.
The Peeler
2017-11-30 22:46:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 21:48:21 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Pelican
It's a common expression in English, but you didn't understand it. You
now have a reference to its source.
Another was of saying it is "Piss off, fuckwit".
Let me know if you need more butcher's paper and crayons.
I'm an atheist, I do not tolerate religious fuckwittery.
Don't flatter yourself, sociopath! You are an IDIOT and nothing else!
--
Some examples of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mathematics":
"100 is 5 times more than 20.
"5 times less" is the opposite of "5 times more", so this makes 100 back to
20 again.
20 is 5 times less than 100, the same as dividing by 5.
An elephant is 5 times bigger than a tiger, a tiger is 5 times smaller than
an elephant."
MID: <***@red.lan>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"I'm comparing being able to tell the difference between 21 and 12 to being
able to tell the difference between 21 and 12. If you think that it's easy
to think a 12 year old is 21, it's only fair to use it as a reason when you
get caught fucking a 12 year old, which you mistook to be 21."
MID: <***@red.lan>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"50 watts is ten times more than 5 watts. Likewise 5 watts is ten times
less than 50 watts."
MID: <***@red.lan>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"The answer is 9. The 0.5 chicken is dead, so basically it's 1 chicken
laying 1 egg per day. The half egg was one halfway out, the only egg for
that day."
MID: <***@red.lan>
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"let's say you prefer 20C water. If you go in 10C water you'd say that was
cold (10C colder than you want). Now you go in 0C water, that's twice as
cold, because it's now 20C colder than you want."
MID: <***@red.lan>
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Even if only 25% of people want it legalised, and let's say LibDems already
have 15% of the vote. If 75% of that 15% stop voting for them because they
don't want it legalised, they're down to 3.75%. But 25% of the 85% who
didn't previously vote for them, change their mind due to this policy, they
gain 21.25%, giving them a total of 25%, well up from 15%."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"If I say 1, then "or so", the "or so" means another 1.
If I say 5, then "or so", the "or so" means up to another 5.
Is English not your first language?"
MID: <***@red.lan>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"If you live for 4 years and die, you wasted 4 years. If you live for 20
years and die, you wasted 20 years, that's 5 times worse."
MID: <***@red.lan>
The Peeler
2017-11-29 22:31:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by Pelican
Tell me that "their cosy little club" isn't a reflection of your rampant
xenophobia?
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
You sociopathic piece of shit are in no position to demand ANYTHING from
normally evolved humans, you abnormal wanker!

Some examples of sociopath Peter Hucker's (aka "Birdbrain") sick interaction
with his environment (neighbours, road users, relatives, etc.), as told by
the idiot himself:
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson") about his neighbours:
"I will not accept money from my neighbours for doing them a favour"
"My neighbour just paid me £40 to brush moss off the roof of her
porch extension. It took me 10 minutes."
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sick sociopathic
world:
"I once collected money for an event that got cancelled. I simply never
told the donaters that it had been."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Wanker Peter Hucker, if he had children:
"If I was a parent I'd deliberately let my brat run amok in shops, hotels,
on the street etc, and when asked why I wasn't controlling it, I'd say "My
hands are tied, I'm not allowed". Since when did our children belong to the
fucking state?!"
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic life:
"I refuse to go back to Tesco after I had a very loud argument with three
managers about whether I could go in shirtless on a baking hot summer's
day."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
world:
"I saw someone today shovelling his pavement clean, pushing it onto the
road. I waited until he went inside, then drove over the snow fairly
quickly, splattering it back where it was."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) abnormal sociopathic
world:
"However I do like to make fun of people. For example, a professor once
told a secretary off for having a topless male model as the wallpaper on her
computer. So I told her he was a hypocrite, and that he had pictures of
transvestites on his (not as wallpaper, but stored on the hard disk). She
spread that around quite quickly."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from wanker Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange
sociopathic
world:
"I once found some photos of spanking porn on m'colleague's computer at
work. He was a lot nicer to me on threat of grassing him off :-)
But when another one grumbled at our secretary for having a shirtless male
model as her desktop background, I couldn't resist telling her about his
transgender photos. She must have been a right gossip, as quite a few
people looked at him funny for the next month or so."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) about his driving habits (no.2):
"Now you see, the proper way to soak somebody is to aim for the puddle from
100 yards back, then it looks like an accident to any moronic nosy hasn't
got a life cyclist. Of course you must adjust your speed inconspicuously
(use gears not brakes which cause lights to come on...).
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange sociopathic
"thinking":
"I class one human (not an immigrunt, a proper human) as worth the same as
any other. Of course relatives rate higher, but any two strangers are the
same, no matter what age. Unless they're under about 2 years old, then I
don't care at all. I'd put abortion right up to 2 years after birth."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world:
"Around here they like to run in front of cars for a laugh. For some reason
they're surprised when I accelerate."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) strange world he's
living in:
"Criminals should be tortured for the amusement of the rest of us."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) pathological "mind"
revealed:
"I am actually considering crashing deliberately into one of my neighbours.
Three times he's stopped on the wrong side of the road, directly in front of
me, then reversed into his drive. I had to brake hard to avoid a head on
collision. Next time I'll glance at the camera to make sure it's rolling
and carry on."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More from Birdbrain's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind":
"Why do people get upset about getting punched on the nose? It's only as bad
as falling off your bike."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
life:
"Because it's fun. I set loads of stuff on fire when I was a kid."
Message-ID: <***@red.lan>
--
More of Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) "insights":
"Because punching someone really isn't that serious. Grow up."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic "mind" at work:
"Satan is god's wife. Woman are evil."
MID: <***@red.lan>
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"mind":
"If I wanted you to stab me with a knife and kill me, you should not
get into trouble for it".
"I would kill my sister if I thought I'd get away with it".
"I'm not what most people think of as human".
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
--
More details from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) sociopathic
"life":
"I have seriously considered poisoning my father"
(Courtesy of Mr Pounder)
MM
2017-11-30 10:26:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.

MM
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-11-30 16:13:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.
Thanks for admitting you're an illogical person.
--
Watching your daughter being collected by her date feels like handing over a million dollar Stradivarius to a gorilla.
MM
2017-12-02 16:47:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:13:20 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.
Thanks for admitting you're an illogical person.
How did you decduce that conclusion from what I wrote?

MM
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-12-02 16:59:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:13:20 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.
Thanks for admitting you're an illogical person.
How did you decduce that conclusion from what I wrote?
Because you based a decision not on logic.
--
What do you call an aerobics instructor who doesn't cause pain & agony?
Unemployed.
MM
2017-12-03 15:45:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 02 Dec 2017 16:59:13 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:13:20 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.
Thanks for admitting you're an illogical person.
How did you decduce that conclusion from what I wrote?
Because you based a decision not on logic.
What "decision"? I don't see any "decision" in any of the above.

MM
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-12-03 16:22:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
On Sat, 02 Dec 2017 16:59:13 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:13:20 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.
Thanks for admitting you're an illogical person.
How did you decduce that conclusion from what I wrote?
Because you based a decision not on logic.
What "decision"? I don't see any "decision" in any of the above.
You decided xenophobia is wrong.
--
There was a blackout in my neighborhood last night.
I had to shoot him before he stole everything.
MM
2017-12-04 11:23:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 03 Dec 2017 16:22:30 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Sat, 02 Dec 2017 16:59:13 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:13:20 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.
Thanks for admitting you're an illogical person.
How did you decduce that conclusion from what I wrote?
Because you based a decision not on logic.
What "decision"? I don't see any "decision" in any of the above.
You decided xenophobia is wrong.
Logically, it is. Does any reasonable person condone automatic
prejudice against people from other nations? Obviously, no.

MM
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-12-04 15:48:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
On Sun, 03 Dec 2017 16:22:30 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Sat, 02 Dec 2017 16:59:13 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:13:20 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by MM
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 21:48:47 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"
Tell me, in your own words, why you believe xenophobia to be a bad thing.
It's not based on any logic.
Thanks for admitting you're an illogical person.
How did you decduce that conclusion from what I wrote?
Because you based a decision not on logic.
What "decision"? I don't see any "decision" in any of the above.
You decided xenophobia is wrong.
Logically, it is. Does any reasonable person condone automatic
prejudice against people from other nations? Obviously, no.
It's logical to assume that if you meet 18 Irishmen and 16 are stupid, that the next one you meet is probably also stupid.
--
"You, you, and you ... Panic. The rest of you, come with me."
- U.S. Marine Corp Gunnery Sgt.
MM
2017-11-30 10:24:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 19:45:46 +0000, finally ditched mimo
Post by finally ditched mimo
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import from Germany
each year?
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and associated jobs,
just because they started the negotiations wanting to bleed the UK dry as an
act of revenge for us leaving their cosy little club?
I don’t think so.
First, what's stopping them from exporting cars to Britain after
Brexit? Let's assume new tariffs will apply, because otherwise your
argument has no basis. So won't they just increase the price of their
superior cars to compensate for the tariff barrier?

If anything, it's only the UK consumer who will be worse off, by
having to pay a new tariff whereas before the cars from Germany were
imported tariff-free.

Notwithstanding the above, Germany and the others in the EU-27 believe
it is more important to hold the union together and keep it cosy and
safe from renegades like the UK.

MM
pamela
2017-11-30 17:39:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by finally ditched mimo
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import
from Germany each year?
I have this feeling that the UK is going to manage perfectly well
without many more Germans cars. The Germans will be able to ship the
cars we would have bout to other markets without too much problem.
Post by finally ditched mimo
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and
associated jobs, just because they started the negotiations
wanting to bleed the UK dry as an act of revenge for us leaving
their cosy little club?
I don't think so.
I do think so. German car workers don't control the EU.
finally ditched mimo
2017-11-30 18:20:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by finally ditched mimo
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import
from Germany each year?
I have this feeling that the UK is going to manage perfectly well
without many more Germans cars. The Germans will be able to ship the
cars we would have bout to other markets without too much problem.
Ok let us leave it to your feeling.

But the articles I read have concluded otherwise, and that 30.000 Germans
would be unemployed.
Post by pamela
Post by finally ditched mimo
Are they really going to risk losing that much business, and
associated jobs, just because they started the negotiations
wanting to bleed the UK dry as an act of revenge for us leaving
their cosy little club?
I don't think so.
I do think so. German car workers don't control the EU.
They will if they were informed how many of them were about to be made
redundant.

But, as with everything with the EU, the public are only fed lies (and have
been for 40 years).

When will the numpties realise, the EU is about syphoning vast amounts of
money from the taxpayer into multinational freemasons?
abelard
2017-11-30 22:08:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by finally ditched mimo
Tell me, how many hundreds of thousands of cars do we import
from Germany each year?
I have this feeling that the UK is going to manage perfectly well
without many more Germans cars. The Germans will be able to ship the
cars we would have bout to other markets without too much problem.
as long as they drop their prices...and as long as they meet emissions
standards....and as long as there isn't a tariff on them...

is that what you meant
--
www.abelard.org
MM
2017-11-30 10:15:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
"Britain has had to cave in, say analysts, with secret financial
settlement in stark contrast to bombast of triggering article 50"
"When the time came to hoist the white flag, the cabinet’s
swashbuckling Brexiters were nowhere to be seen. Instead, it was left
to civil servants to hammer out the terms of Britain’s expensive
retreat from the EU, settling a divorce bill that could pave the way
for a wider exit agreement struck almost entirely on terms demanded by
Brussels.
"The secretive circumstances of the financial settlement, which were
not even officially confirmed by ministers in parliament on Wednesday,
are a far cry from the public fanfare that accompanied the start of
the Brexit negotiations. When Theresa May invoked article 50 in March,
she boasted that it was time to 'make our own decisions and our own
laws... to take control of the things that matter most to us'.
"As the formal talks ground on in the sterile surroundings of the
Berlaymont building, the headquarters of the European commission, it
became clear that it was Brussels bureaucrats who still called the
shots, to the point of vetoing attempts to vary the venue on British
turf occasionally.
"David Davis, the Brexit secretary, turned up nonetheless for six
increasingly tetchy rounds of talks, accompanied by up to 100 British
officials at a time and reportedly carrying his documents in a Faraday
cage-protected briefcase to prevent electronic snooping. After the
final such encounter, which shrunk from a week to a matter of hours,
the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, called time and declared
that the UK had a fortnight to settle its debts or would miss any
chance to give British business some breathing room with a
transitional deal."
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/29/brexit-uk-white-flag-eu-divorce-bill
But, basically, we're gonna have to pay more than £20bn. A lot more.
We've dangled a carrot.
If that is true, why have we waited for six months? Did we hope they
would jump first, and now they haven't, we have to just bend over? Is
that also a part of your Negotiation 101?
Post by Norman Wells
If we don't get what we want on trade, that carrot disappears.
And then everyone will see that it was merely a ploy and we never
intended to honour our latest promise.
Post by Norman Wells
At last it seems negotiation may be about to begin.
But you seem to be suggesting that we could stop it immediately if we
feel we're being given the runaround. Is that also a part of your
Negotiation 101? Threaten, then withdraw? We provide the goad AND the
pricks!

MM
Loading...