Discussion:
Brexit - Rat shit
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Judith
2017-12-04 15:57:56 UTC
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It's getting better and better,

Mayhem we could say.

No deal
Phi
2017-12-04 16:05:15 UTC
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Post by Judith
It's getting better and better,
Mayhem we could say.
No deal
Walk away.......easy peasy.
Jethro_uk
2017-12-04 16:06:12 UTC
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Post by Judith
It's getting better and better,
Mayhem we could say.
No deal
I think your keyboard might need fixing, as when you went to type "the
entire world is beating a path to our door to partake of the enormous
boom in GDP since Brexit", it actually came out as "No deal"·
The Todal
2017-12-04 17:02:37 UTC
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Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Judith
It's getting better and better,
Mayhem we could say.
No deal
I think your keyboard might need fixing, as when you went to type "the
entire world is beating a path to our door to partake of the enormous
boom in GDP since Brexit", it actually came out as "No deal"·
Britain is doing very well. If it could only concentrate on its work and
stop being the class comedian there's a very real expectation that it
could achieve at least one GCSE in a year's time.

The latest news looks gloomy but hey, just avert your eyes.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/brexit-uk-economy-losses-eu-referendum-result-billions-leave-european-union-a8081841.html

The Brexit vote has already inflicted a hit of almost £20bn on the UK
economy – or around £300m for each week since the June 2016 referendum,
according to a new analysis.

A team of four economists affiliated to the respected Centre for
Economic Policy Research estimated what the likely path of the UK
economy would have been if the referendum result had gone the other way.

The Vote Leave campaign had notoriously claimed in the referendum
campaign that quitting the EU would free up around £350m a week of extra
funding for UK public services.

Extrapolating the CEPR economists' exercise to the end of 2018 implies a
cost to the UK economy of £60bn, or 2.2 per cent of GDP.

The economists said their estimates show the evolving costs of Brexit
“in an unbiased, transparent, and entirely data-driven way”.
Incubus
2017-12-04 17:08:30 UTC
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Post by The Todal
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Judith
It's getting better and better,
Mayhem we could say.
No deal
I think your keyboard might need fixing, as when you went to type "the
entire world is beating a path to our door to partake of the enormous
boom in GDP since Brexit", it actually came out as "No deal"·
Britain is doing very well. If it could only concentrate on its work and
stop being the class comedian there's a very real expectation that it
could achieve at least one GCSE in a year's time.
The latest news looks gloomy but hey, just avert your eyes.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/brexit-uk-economy-losses-eu-referendum-result-billions-leave-european-union-a8081841.html
The Brexit vote has already inflicted a hit of almost £20bn on the UK
economy – or around £300m for each week since the June 2016 referendum,
according to a new analysis.
A team of four economists affiliated to the respected Centre for
Economic Policy Research estimated what the likely path of the UK
economy would have been if the referendum result had gone the other way.
The Vote Leave campaign had notoriously claimed in the referendum
campaign that quitting the EU would free up around £350m a week of extra
funding for UK public services.
Extrapolating the CEPR economists' exercise to the end of 2018 implies a
cost to the UK economy of £60bn, or 2.2 per cent of GDP.
The economists said their estimates show the evolving costs of Brexit
“in an unbiased, transparent, and entirely data-driven way”.
'Beyond the funding provided by the registered, European charity founded
in 1983 by Richard Portes [...] the Centre is financially supported also
by a large number of central banks, private financial institutions, and
international organisations.'

I'm not sure we should trust their objectivity. Still, not nearly as
bad as this:

https://order-order.com/2017/10/17/oecd-has-received-85-million-from-eu/
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