Discussion:
Bumper Xmas price rise - Brexit Bonus
Add Reply
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-29 09:33:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.

I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac

and the Mirror

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772

pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when they said it would cost them.

Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food etc."...
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 10:22:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
and the Mirror
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when they said it would cost them.
Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food etc."...
Yup, everything's Brexit's fault.

The trouble is, the articles you refer to don't quite support your agenda:

"Rise in the cost of vegetables has led to the increase"

"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."

Don't you ever actually read what you rely on?
Lancer
2017-11-29 10:56:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
and the Mirror
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when
they said it would cost them.
Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah
humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food
etc."...
Yup, everything's Brexit's fault.
"Rise in the cost of vegetables has led to the increase"
Caroline Bloor, Good Housekeeping’s consumer director told the Guardian:
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.

We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the start
of the year.
Post by Norman Wells
Don't you ever actually read what you rely on?
You don't.
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 12:55:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
and the Mirror
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when
they said it would cost them.
Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah
humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food
etc."...
Yup, everything's Brexit's fault.
"Rise in the cost of vegetables has led to the increase"
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh. I wouldn't be
surprised, but relying on it to make a point is rather silly.
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?

Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
Post by Lancer
We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the start
of the year.
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?

It's called supply and demand.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-29 17:22:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?

SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -

http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html

do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!

those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Norman Wells
2017-11-29 19:17:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
It's a direct quote from an article you relied on!

You can't have it both ways.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?
Why don't you answer the question?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -
We were actually talking about the price of iceberg lettuces following
floods in Spain.

But that was before you snipped all the relevant stuff because it didn't
fit your agenda.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html
Is that due to Brexit? I can't find any mention of it.

Oh, sorry, it *must* be due to Brexit. Everything is according to you.

"In the meantime, though, if you’re desperate for a chocolate orange
your best bet is to head to Asda, where a Terry’s Chocolate Orange is
£1, or Morrisons, where it’s currently 90p."

And that's a direct quote from the first article you link to above.

Don't you *ever* read what you rely on before posting your inanities?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!
those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Gosh, yes! When absolute staples like Terry's chocolate oranges cost
90p, it's really time to worry.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-11-30 10:44:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
It's a direct quote from an article you relied on!
You can't have it both ways.
It may not be obvious to the Daily Mail, but the Leave induced fall in the pound IS causing food inflation (and much else).
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?
Why don't you answer the question?
People often buy [frozen] turkey in advance - the price now is unlikely to fall in the next three weeks, although prices might rise if crops are frozen in the ground.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -
We were actually talking about the price of iceberg lettuces following
floods in Spain.
But that was before you snipped all the relevant stuff because it didn't
fit your agenda.
The subject is Xmas prices rises - don't remember having salad with my turkey, so I did snip the drifted part of the thread.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html
Is that due to Brexit? I can't find any mention of it.
Oh, sorry, it *must* be due to Brexit. Everything is according to you.
Cocoa is a traded world commodity and priced in dollars. The pound fell 10% immediately on the leave vote and has not recovered ergo the price of cocoa is 11% higher in the UK and as it forms a large part of chocolate the price of products containing it has and will rise notwithstanding any supply variations.
Post by Norman Wells
"In the meantime, though, if you’re desperate for a chocolate orange
your best bet is to head to Asda, where a Terry’s Chocolate Orange is
£1, or Morrisons, where it’s currently 90p."
Still smaller (shrinkflation).
Post by Norman Wells
And that's a direct quote from the first article you link to above.
Don't you *ever* read what you rely on before posting your inanities?
Post by R. Mark Clayton
do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!
those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Gosh, yes! When absolute staples like Terry's chocolate oranges cost
90p, it's really time to worry.
Sad how you trivialise a serious issue, but then as I predicted some Brextremist will be spouting "Bah humbug!".
pamela
2017-11-30 17:51:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
.............
Sad how you trivialise a serious issue, but then as I predicted
some Brextremist will be spouting "Bah humbug!".
Kay Neufeld, an economist at economics consultancy the Cebr, said:

"Prices have been on the rise since the EU referendum last year
with inflation projected to peak just before Christmas.

Due to intense competition between supermarkets in the UK, the
cost of food had been falling for much of 2015 and 2016.

However, as the UK imports over half of its food the
depreciation of sterling inevitably feeds through into higher
prices at the till."
n***@gmail.com
2017-11-30 21:28:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
All I've said has been direct quotes from an article YOU relied on to support your argument. Now you rubbish it.

Shame you don't actually read what you link to and can't construct a rational case.
Fredxx
2017-11-30 20:00:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
Good for rates of obesity.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -
http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html
do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!
those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Except some of us have has a pay increase more than making up inflation.

You don't work, do you.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-12-01 18:59:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fredxx
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
Good for rates of obesity.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -
http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html
do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!
those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Except some of us have has a pay increase more than making up inflation.
20 - 30%?

That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Post by Fredxx
You don't work, do you.
Semi retired old boy - not claimed any benefit since I was a teenager (UB briefly between jobs).
R. Mark Clayton
2017-12-01 19:00:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Fredxx
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
Good for rates of obesity.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -
http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html
do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!
those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Except some of us have has a pay increase more than making up inflation.
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42199020

sorry missed the link.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Fredxx
You don't work, do you.
Semi retired old boy - not claimed any benefit since I was a teenager (UB briefly between jobs).
Yellow
2017-12-02 18:09:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is due to the
butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has increased three
fold.

This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low that dairy
farmers could no longer afford to support their herds so they sold off
some of their cows, and because of the world wide increased interesting
in baking.
Ophelia
2017-12-02 18:13:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Yellow" wrote in message news:***@News.Individual.NET...

On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is due to the
butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has increased three
fold.

This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low that dairy
farmers could no longer afford to support their herds so they sold off
some of their cows, and because of the world wide increased interesting
in baking.

==

"The pound hits $1.35

Posted: 02 Dec 2017 01:18 AM PST

When the pound was going down we had daily reports of how worrying this was,
usually ascribed for no good reason to Brexit.
The pound is now up by 12.5% from its recent low, but there is little
comment. It does not normally feature on news broadcasts in the way it did
when going down. Is this big move up also because of Brexit? Is it good
news?

I have both before and after the vote said that the pound has been volatile
against the dollar and the Euro all the time we have been in the EU, and
will doubtless still go up and down once we are out of the EU. Its movements
are not usually to do with the Brexit."

John Redwood
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk
R. Mark Clayton
2017-12-03 11:06:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
SNIP
Post by Ophelia
"The pound hits $1.35
Posted: 02 Dec 2017 01:18 AM PST
When the pound was going down we had daily reports of how worrying this was,
usually ascribed for no good reason to Brexit.
The pound is now up by 12.5% from its recent low, but there is little
comment. It does not normally feature on news broadcasts in the way it did
when going down. Is this big move up also because of Brexit? Is it good
news?
I have both before and after the vote said that the pound has been volatile
against the dollar and the Euro all the time we have been in the EU, and
will doubtless still go up and down once we are out of the EU. Its movements
are not usually to do with the Brexit."
John Redwood
Yes just dismiss the largest and most easily ascribed fall in the pound for decades.

Its recent partial recovery against the dollar is in large part because US rednecks elected a twit as president and he twitters every day...
Fredxx
2017-12-02 22:06:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is due to the
butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has increased three
fold.
This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low that dairy
farmers could no longer afford to support their herds so they sold off
some of their cows, and because of the world wide increased interesting
in baking.
Largely from tit for tat sanctions with Russia, where they banned the
import of milk and milk products from the EU, causing milk prices to
drop which decimated dairy herds.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2016-05-24/dairy-mega-trends-russia-continues-ban/7432468

Now there's an increase in demand without the supply.

Just another reason to leave the EU.
pamela
2017-12-02 23:58:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fredxx
Post by Yellow
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas -
Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is
due to the butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has
increased three fold.
This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low
that dairy farmers could no longer afford to support their
herds so they sold off some of their cows, and because of the
world wide increased interesting in baking.
Largely from tit for tat sanctions with Russia, where they
banned the import of milk and milk products from the EU, causing
milk prices to drop which decimated dairy herds.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2016-05-24/dairy-mega-trends-rus
sia-continues-ban/7432468
Now there's an increase in demand without the supply.
Just another reason to leave the EU.
Buy Russian milk? :)
Fredxx
2017-12-03 13:34:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by Fredxx
Post by Yellow
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas -
Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is
due to the butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has
increased three fold.
This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low
that dairy farmers could no longer afford to support their
herds so they sold off some of their cows, and because of the
world wide increased interesting in baking.
Largely from tit for tat sanctions with Russia, where they
banned the import of milk and milk products from the EU, causing
milk prices to drop which decimated dairy herds.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2016-05-24/dairy-mega-trends-rus
sia-continues-ban/7432468
Now there's an increase in demand without the supply.
Just another reason to leave the EU.
Buy Russian milk? :)
Last article I read implied the investment in Russian dairy herds and
equipment hadn't met expectations and there was still a Russian milk
shortage.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-12-03 11:04:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is due to the
butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has increased three
fold.
And in the UK a large part of this increase is due to the fall in the pound.
Post by Yellow
This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low that dairy
farmers could no longer afford to support their herds so they sold off
some of their cows, and because of the world wide increased interesting
in baking.
Is bake off sold outside the UK?
pensive hamster
2017-12-03 11:27:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is due to the
butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has increased three
fold.
And in the UK a large part of this increase is due to the fall in the pound.
Post by Yellow
This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low that dairy
farmers could no longer afford to support their herds so they sold off
some of their cows, and because of the world wide increased interesting
in baking.
Is bake off sold outside the UK?
I'm told bake off-type programmes are very popular
in a number of countries.
Yellow
2017-12-03 15:40:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 03:04:05 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:59:30 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Apparently the reason for the rise in the cost of biscuits is due to the
butter shortage meaning that the price of butter has increased three
fold.
And in the UK a large part of this increase is due to the fall in the pound.
I know you would like that to be true, but it simply isn't.

Butter cost has increase 3 fold while food prices on average (including
the price of butter and biscuits) have increased by 4.1%.

Mind you, my Malted Milks have not gone up (45p) and I bought a box of
chocolate Christmas biscuits in Tesco last night for £2, half price from
£4. So who really knows what to think.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low that dairy
farmers could no longer afford to support their herds so they sold off
some of their cows, and because of the world wide increased interesting
in baking.
Is bake off sold outside the UK?
I expect so. But whatever, it seems to be the case that the Chinese are
now very keen on pastries.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-12-03 17:28:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 03:04:05 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Yellow
Post by R. Mark Clayton
And in the UK a large part of this increase is due to the fall in the pound.
I know you would like that to be true, but it simply isn't.
Butter cost has increase 3 fold while food prices on average (including
the price of butter and biscuits) have increased by 4.1%.
It simply is true. Milk may only be up 9% [at Lidl today], any many other foods both bulky and perishable and not easily transported have only risen slightly due to input price increases.

Butter OTOH is easily exported, so farmers have been selling it abroad for the 11% extra [more last year] they can get just due the Brexit effect. So if butter has gone up 30%, a third of that is due to the Leave vote induced slump in the pound.

The price of milk derived products has been volatile, but as can be seen from this graph the big surge occurred after the Leave vote, when the pound fell 10% due to the vote and then another 10% due to PM resigning etc.

Loading Image...
Post by Yellow
Mind you, my Malted Milks have not gone up (45p) and I bought a box of
chocolate Christmas biscuits in Tesco last night for £2, half price from
£4. So who really knows what to think.
Tesco's have also cut the price of artificial Xmas trees 26% since last week!
Post by Yellow
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
This has happened because the price of milk was driven so low that dairy
farmers could no longer afford to support their herds so they sold off
some of their cows, and because of the world wide increased interesting
in baking.
one of the reasons for CAP was to dampen the huge hysteresis in milk prices.
Post by Yellow
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Is bake off sold outside the UK?
I expect so. But whatever, it seems to be the case that the Chinese are
now very keen on pastries.
Yellow
2017-12-03 18:39:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 09:28:13 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Yellow
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 03:04:05 -0800 (PST), R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Yellow
Post by R. Mark Clayton
And in the UK a large part of this increase is due to the fall in the pound.
I know you would like that to be true, but it simply isn't.
Butter cost has increase 3 fold while food prices on average (including
the price of butter and biscuits) have increased by 4.1%.
It simply is true. Milk may only be up 9% [at Lidl today], any many other foods both bulky and perishable and not easily transported have only risen slightly due to input price increases.
Butter OTOH is easily exported, so farmers have been selling it abroad for the 11% extra [more last year] they can get just due the Brexit effect. So if butter has gone up 30%, a third of that is due to the Leave vote induced slump in the pound.
Please stop making up stories to fit your personal 'facts' as not
everything is about Brexit.
Fredxx
2017-12-02 22:01:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Fredxx
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
Good for rates of obesity.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -
http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html
do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!
those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Except some of us have has a pay increase more than making up inflation.
20 - 30%?
That's the hike in the price of biscuits - Merry Xmas - Brrrrexit!
Post by Fredxx
You don't work, do you.
Semi retired old boy - not claimed any benefit since I was a teenager (UB briefly between jobs).
Does that mean you voluntarily forgo your pension?
JNugent
2017-12-01 15:32:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
I only linked the Mail, because it is the Brextremists paper of choice. The Mail is tosh and we keep a copy in the karsi for wi...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
And export salmon so the price of that is well up too - in large part due to the Brexit bounce in the pound.
Surely the majority of salmon is sold during the several "half price"
promotions the major supermarkets all do each year?

It's certainly the only time we buy it (the freezer is currently
well-stocked with meal-sized portions).
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
Yes there is - the pound is ~10% down and is causing food inflation (as predicted here).
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
You think they will get cheaper then?
???

Fresh vegetables bought today (potatos, sprouts, carots, turnips,
parsnips) will not be so appetising in three and a bit weeks' time.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
It's called supply and demand.
Indeed for Sterling - demand is well down, so everything imported costs more - like cocoa: -
http://metro.co.uk/2017/11/29/terrys-chocolate-orange-has-nearly-doubled-in-price-since-last-christmas-despite-being-smaller-7117269/
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/food-and-drink/shrinking-terrys-chocolate-orange-doubles-price-supermarkets/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/terry-chocolate-oranges-price-increase-double-christmas-quality-street-roses-celebrations-a8077741.html
do you hear a fluttering noise? - yup it's Brexit turkeys coming home to roost!
those poor dumb Brexit believers are going to have a rude awakening...
Interest rate rises will come, and with it, a better market price for
sterling.
Lancer
2017-11-30 08:53:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
and the Mirror
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when
they said it would cost them.
Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah
humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food
etc."...
Yup, everything's Brexit's fault.
"Rise in the cost of vegetables has led to the increase"
Caroline Bloor, Good Housekeeping’s consumer director told the
Guardian: “There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the
board over the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound
following the Brexit vote."
In that case, the Mail article relied on is utter tosh.
The Mail tosh? By going on about British farmers and British crops they
think this country is self-sufficient, so yes.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
What don't you understand about "There is no obvious reason why veg
should be more expensive this year"?
If the pound has been devalued against the Euro then prices will rise,
supermarkets said they absorbed the rise last year.
Post by Norman Wells
Anyway, is everyone really rushing about buying fresh veg for their
Christmas dinner in November?
Yep, along with mince pies that go out of date before Xmas
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Lancer
We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the
start of the year.
Nothing to do with Brexit, though, is it?
Never said it was, but it is a taste of what would happen if we were to
just walk away without any deal.
Post by Norman Wells
It's called supply and demand.
The supply from the EU.
Yellow
2017-11-29 13:11:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lancer
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the start
of the year.
<sigh> Iceberg is currently about as cheap as they get, at around 45p.

:-p
Ian Jackson
2017-11-29 13:32:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <ovm3od$16k$***@dont-email.me>, Lancer <***@invalid.com>
writes
Post by Lancer
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the
start of the year.
Indeed. In Waitrose, iceberg lettuces went up to £2-50 (imported from
the USA). They soon went down to the previous price (80p or £1, I
think). However, for several months they have been only 50p (UK-grown, I
think).

Their grapes are also at a bargain price. For years a 500g box was £2-20
or £2-50 - but in the summer they suddenly dropped to £1-60, and only
recently went up to £1-80.

On the down side, their frozen rice was £1 for years - but a couple of
months ago it rose to £1-25 and then £1-30.

Anyway, the price drops obviously cannot be explained by the fallen
pound - so maybe it's simply competition from yer Aldi and yer Lidl?
--
Ian
Yellow
2017-11-29 20:48:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 13:32:50 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
writes
Post by Lancer
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the
start of the year.
Indeed. In Waitrose, iceberg lettuces went up to £2-50 (imported from
the USA). They soon went down to the previous price (80p or £1, I
think). However, for several months they have been only 50p (UK-grown, I
think).
Their grapes are also at a bargain price. For years a 500g box was £2-20
or £2-50 - but in the summer they suddenly dropped to £1-60, and only
recently went up to £1-80.
On the down side, their frozen rice was £1 for years - but a couple of
months ago it rose to £1-25 and then £1-30.
Anyway, the price drops obviously cannot be explained by the fallen
pound - so maybe it's simply competition from yer Aldi and yer Lidl?
Dry rice rose in price too so I wonder if there was a problem with the
harvest?
Ian Jackson
2017-11-29 22:08:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Dry rice rose in price too so I wonder if there was a problem with the
harvest?
There was. This year's UK rice crop failed completely.
--
Ian
Yellow
2017-11-29 23:48:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:08:20 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Dry rice rose in price too so I wonder if there was a problem with the
harvest?
There was. This year's UK rice crop failed completely.
Ha bloody ha. :-)
JNugent
2017-12-01 15:28:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
writes
Post by Lancer
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the
start of the year.
Indeed. In Waitrose, iceberg lettuces went up to £2-50 (imported from
the USA). They soon went down to the previous price (80p or £1, I
think). However, for several months they have been only 50p (UK-grown, I
think).
I'm sure they were 49p in Tesco last week.

And this is the time of year that salads are traditionally either not
available or imported and therefore bearing transport costs.
Post by Ian Jackson
Their grapes are also at a bargain price. For years a 500g box was £2-20
or £2-50 - but in the summer they suddenly dropped to £1-60, and only
recently went up to £1-80.
On the down side, their frozen rice was £1 for years - but a couple of
months ago it rose to £1-25 and then £1-30.
Prepared rice, surely?

Who would buy cooked or part-cooked rice as an ingredient, whether
frozen or not?

Well, apart from that VeeTee stuff, obviously - the pilau variety is
delicious. But it isn't frozen.
Post by Ian Jackson
Anyway, the price drops obviously cannot be explained by the fallen
pound - so maybe it's simply competition from yer Aldi and yer Lidl?
Competition as a concept is not usually accepted by Remoaners.

It smacks too much of proper economics instead of the cargo-cultism they
prefer.
JNugent
2017-11-30 10:11:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
and the Mirror
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when
they said it would cost them.
Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah
humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food
etc."...
Yup, everything's Brexit's fault.
"Rise in the cost of vegetables has led to the increase"
“There’s been a significant rise in food prices across the board over
the last year as a result of the weakening of the pound following the
Brexit vote."
Post by Norman Wells
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
<sigh> We import vegetables too you know.
We grow Iceberg lettuce in this country but prices nearly doubled and
supermarkets were rationing them when Spain had their flood at the start
of the year.
Was the Spanish flood due to the UK's independence vote?
Post by Lancer
Post by Norman Wells
Don't you ever actually read what you rely on?
You don't.
Yellow
2017-11-29 13:08:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
and the Mirror
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when they said it would cost them.
Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food etc."...
Yup, everything's Brexit's fault.
"Rise in the cost of vegetables has led to the increase"
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
Don't you ever actually read what you rely on?
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
Ian Jackson
2017-11-29 13:40:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
--
Ian
Christie
2017-11-29 14:18:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
Ian Jackson
2017-11-29 14:29:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
--
Ian
Christie
2017-11-29 15:03:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.

If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Ian Jackson
2017-11-29 15:47:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
Very true.
Post by Christie
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
You're probably missing the most nutritious bits.
--
Ian
Yellow
2017-11-29 20:54:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!! Along with the sprouts.
Ian Jackson
2017-11-29 22:11:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!! Along with the sprouts.
Have you got yours on yet?
--
Ian
Yellow
2017-11-29 23:49:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:11:01 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!! Along with the sprouts.
Have you got yours on yet?
Sprouts?
Christie
2017-11-29 22:16:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yellow
2017-11-29 23:52:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
Ophelia
2017-12-01 15:37:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Yellow" wrote in message news:***@News.Individual.NET...

On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.

==

You are welcome to my share toO:)
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk
Yellow
2017-12-02 18:26:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)
Ian Jackson
2017-12-02 20:28:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)
Garlic is the work of The Devil. It stinks the place out, gives you foul
breath - and I can still taste it two days afterwards. Unfortunately,
an increasing amount of pre-prepared food and soups has it added. I
absolutely hate it.
--
Ian
kat
2017-12-02 23:14:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Garlic is the work of The Devil. It stinks the place out, gives you foul
breath -  and I can still taste it two days afterwards. Unfortunately,
an increasing amount of pre-prepared food and soups has it added. I
absolutely hate it.
Does that stop you clearing your plate? :-)
--
kat
Post by Ian Jackson
^..^<
Ian Jackson
2017-12-03 09:06:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Garlic is the work of The Devil. It stinks the place out, gives you
foul breath -  and I can still taste it two days afterwards.
Unfortunately, an increasing amount of pre-prepared food and soups
has it added. I absolutely hate it.
Does that stop you clearing your plate? :-)
No - but I afterwards often deeply regret not doing so.
--
Ian
kat
2017-12-03 12:34:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by kat
 Garlic is the work of The Devil. It stinks the place out, gives you
foul  breath -  and I can still taste it two days afterwards.
Unfortunately,  an increasing amount of pre-prepared food and soups
has it added. I  absolutely hate it.
Does that stop you clearing your plate? :-)
No - but I afterwards often deeply regret not doing so.
I guess the answer is to prepare your own, garlic-free, food. And you
can add a little if you want, rather than a lot, and not suffer the
after-taste.
--
kat
Post by Ian Jackson
^..^<
Ian Jackson
2017-12-03 13:56:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by kat
 Garlic is the work of The Devil. It stinks the place out, gives
you foul  breath -  and I can still taste it two days afterwards.
Unfortunately,  an increasing amount of pre-prepared food and soups
has it added. I  absolutely hate it.
Does that stop you clearing your plate? :-)
No - but I afterwards often deeply regret not doing so.
I guess the answer is to prepare your own, garlic-free, food. And you
can add a little if you want, rather than a lot, and not suffer the
after-taste.
I could probably tolerate food with garlic added - provided is was added
in homeopathic quantities,
--
Ian
MM
2017-12-04 11:13:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 3 Dec 2017 13:56:19 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by kat
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by kat
 Garlic is the work of The Devil. It stinks the place out, gives
you foul  breath -  and I can still taste it two days afterwards.
Unfortunately,  an increasing amount of pre-prepared food and soups
has it added. I  absolutely hate it.
Does that stop you clearing your plate? :-)
No - but I afterwards often deeply regret not doing so.
I guess the answer is to prepare your own, garlic-free, food. And you
can add a little if you want, rather than a lot, and not suffer the
after-taste.
I could probably tolerate food with garlic added - provided is was added
in homeopathic quantities,
Ooh, I LOVE garlic! I put it in practically all savoury dishes I make.

MM
Yellow
2017-12-02 23:29:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 2 Dec 2017 20:28:40 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)
Garlic is the work of The Devil. It stinks the place out, gives you foul
breath - and I can still taste it two days afterwards.
There have to be some advantages to living alone. :-)
Post by Ian Jackson
Unfortunately,
an increasing amount of pre-prepared food and soups has it added. I
absolutely hate it.
I hadn't noticed that but of course if you don't like something you
notice it straight away. I am allergic to rocket for example and can
spot it at 10,000 pace distance.
JNugent
2017-12-02 22:32:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)]
Today, in Asda, we found that seasonal frozen favourite, sprouts with
chestnuts.

I love the combination, but they're often hard to find. We bought two
bags for the freezer...
Yellow
2017-12-02 23:31:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)]
Today, in Asda, we found that seasonal frozen favourite, sprouts with
chestnuts.
I love the combination, but they're often hard to find. We bought two
bags for the freezer...
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
kat
2017-12-03 12:35:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by JNugent
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)]
Today, in Asda, we found that seasonal frozen favourite, sprouts with
chestnuts.
I love the combination, but they're often hard to find. We bought two
bags for the freezer...
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
--
kat
Post by Yellow
^..^<
Yellow
2017-12-03 15:42:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
Post by JNugent
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)]
Today, in Asda, we found that seasonal frozen favourite, sprouts with
chestnuts.
I love the combination, but they're often hard to find. We bought two
bags for the freezer...
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
JNugent
2017-12-03 15:55:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
Post by JNugent
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)]
Today, in Asda, we found that seasonal frozen favourite, sprouts with
chestnuts.
I love the combination, but they're often hard to find. We bought two
bags for the freezer...
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
Morrisons used to do bigger bags of "sprouts and chestnuts" which were
better value, but I haven't seen those for a couple of years.
Yellow
2017-12-03 18:41:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
Post by JNugent
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 22:16:43 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the
plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or
roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually
liked
sprouts. :)
Yep, I am she. Really not a fan of fruit at all, despite having a sweet
tooth when it comes to the likes of chocolate, but veg - yes please. And
this time of year spouts are noticeably at their best.
==
You are welcome to my share toO:)
Stir fried with garlic and soy, and with chestnuts? Yum. :-)]
Today, in Asda, we found that seasonal frozen favourite, sprouts with
chestnuts.
I love the combination, but they're often hard to find. We bought two
bags for the freezer...
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
Morrisons used to do bigger bags of "sprouts and chestnuts" which were
better value, but I haven't seen those for a couple of years.
I'll check the websites to see who is doing what.
kat
2017-12-03 23:51:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
I find the texture not quite right, or did the last time we had them.
maybe they have improved.
--
kat
Post by Yellow
^..^<
Yellow
2017-12-04 01:14:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
I find the texture not quite right, or did the last time we had them.
maybe they have improved.
I microwave cook but use a steamer, so they do not sit in the water, and
I find that means they do not go soggy that way, which is sometimes an
issue with frozen sprouts.

But I do think they have probably improved the process because I would
never eat frozen carrots as they had a spongy feel to them but now they
are find. Not the same or as nice as fresh, but perfectly OK.
kat
2017-12-04 08:13:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
I find the texture not quite right, or did the last time we had them.
maybe they have improved.
I microwave cook but use a steamer, so they do not sit in the water, and
I find that means they do not go soggy that way, which is sometimes an
issue with frozen sprouts.
But I do think they have probably improved the process because I would
never eat frozen carrots as they had a spongy feel to them but now they
are find. Not the same or as nice as fresh, but perfectly OK.
I shall have to try them. The little slivers of carrot in a bag of mixed
veg don't seem too bad. I use either an electric steamer, or cook them
in the microwave in little more than a splash of water, and have no
soggy sprouts - or carrots. I do like my veggies underdone too which
probably helps.


And last night we had that roasted swede thing mentioned in this thread
and it is very good. :-)
--
kat
Post by Yellow
^..^<
MM
2017-12-04 11:20:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
I normally buy the sprouts and chestnuts separately but I will get some
of that and give it a try - thanks.
I prefer fresh sprouts to frozen, and so I add the frozen chestnuts.
But it's a handy bag for those that like it.
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
I find the texture not quite right, or did the last time we had them.
maybe they have improved.
I microwave cook but use a steamer, so they do not sit in the water, and
I find that means they do not go soggy that way, which is sometimes an
issue with frozen sprouts.
But I do think they have probably improved the process because I would
never eat frozen carrots as they had a spongy feel to them but now they
are find. Not the same or as nice as fresh, but perfectly OK.
No, the proper way to cook sprouts is to stir-fry them with butter,
garlic and bacon lardons. Put a lid on to get the steam effect, but
take it off towards the end of sautéeing.

MM
MM
2017-12-04 11:17:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
Fresh sprouts are a pain to peel. I prefer to let migrant workers in
the Birds Eye food factory do it for me and I pay a bit extra to keep
them gainfully employed and their families back home able to enjoy a
nice Christmas.

But be thankful that your fresh sprouts are being harvested by East
European migrant workers. What will you do come Christmas 2018? Tinned
sprouts from the USA? (Probably washed in chlorine...)

MM
JNugent
2017-12-04 11:26:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by MM
Post by Yellow
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
Fresh sprouts are a pain to peel. I prefer to let migrant workers in
the Birds Eye food factory do it for me and I pay a bit extra to keep
them gainfully employed and their families back home able to enjoy a
nice Christmas.
But be thankful that your fresh sprouts are being harvested by East
European migrant workers. What will you do come Christmas 2018? Tinned
sprouts from the USA? (Probably washed in chlorine...)
MM
After all, we never, ever, had sprouts or any other agricultural produce
before we joined the Common Market, did we?
R. Mark Clayton
2017-12-04 11:53:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by MM
Post by Yellow
I prefer fresh sprouts too, especially this time of year, but a sprout
is a sprout and I am game when it comes to trying all the options. :-)
Fresh sprouts are a pain to peel. I prefer to let migrant workers in
the Birds Eye food factory do it for me and I pay a bit extra to keep
them gainfully employed and their families back home able to enjoy a
nice Christmas.
But be thankful that your fresh sprouts are being harvested by East
European migrant workers. What will you do come Christmas 2018? Tinned
sprouts from the USA? (Probably washed in chlorine...)
MM
After all, we never, ever, had sprouts or any other agricultural produce
before we joined the Common Market, did we?
Funny you should mention that. I lived in [central] Scotland from 1960 until 1970. The choice of fresh fruit and vegetables at the grocers' was lamentable - onion, hard cabbage, turnips (swede in England), carrots, the odd cauliflower and spuds. As a special treat my mother used to buy a small box of Bird's Eye frozen broccoli, at huge expense, from a shop with a freezer.
JNugent
2017-12-01 15:35:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.

I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.

But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Christie
2017-12-01 17:42:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an option in a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
JNugent
2017-12-02 03:35:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
[ ... ]
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Up north, parsnips are, in my experience, rarely seen. Yet in London and
the sahf, they are as obligatory in Christmas Dinner as sprouts. I was
31 and had never eaten a parsnip (not sure I'd even seen one) until I
was served some on a works-outing for Christmas Dinner. On sight, I
assumed they were just more potato (albeit oddly-cut pieces), but th
over-sweet taste caused me to ask a fellow diner what they were.

I still don't like them, though I've been served them many times during
the intervening decades.
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an option in a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
Sounds good.
Ophelia
2017-12-02 09:28:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
[ ... ]
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Up north, parsnips are, in my experience, rarely seen. Yet in London and
the sahf, they are as obligatory in Christmas Dinner as sprouts. I was
31 and had never eaten a parsnip (not sure I'd even seen one) until I
was served some on a works-outing for Christmas Dinner. On sight, I
assumed they were just more potato (albeit oddly-cut pieces), but th
over-sweet taste caused me to ask a fellow diner what they were.

I still don't like them, though I've been served them many times during
the intervening decades.
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an option in a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
Sounds good.

==

Plenty of parsnips on the stores here in Scotland. I only like them if they
are thoroughly roasted. If not they taste dreadful. I never understood how
people like them boiled.
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk
Christie
2017-12-02 11:01:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Up north, parsnips are, in my experience, rarely seen. Yet in London and
the sahf, they are as obligatory in Christmas Dinner as sprouts. I was
31 and had never eaten a parsnip (not sure I'd even seen one) until I
was served some on a works-outing for Christmas Dinner. On sight, I
assumed they were just more potato (albeit oddly-cut pieces), but th
over-sweet taste caused me to ask a fellow diner what they were.
I still don't like them, though I've been served them many times during
the intervening decades.
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an option in a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
Sounds good.
==
Plenty of parsnips on the stores here in Scotland. I only like them if they
are thoroughly roasted. If not they taste dreadful. I never understood how
people like them boiled.
That is exactly how I feel about parsnips. Well roasted, their sweetness is
nice and welcome (slices of small ones, honey-roasted are absolutely
delicious). But boiled parsnip I just leave where it is (same with boiled
swede) - I can't rescued them with any amount of butter and/or salt.
Ophelia
2017-12-02 15:21:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Up north, parsnips are, in my experience, rarely seen. Yet in London and
the sahf, they are as obligatory in Christmas Dinner as sprouts. I was
31 and had never eaten a parsnip (not sure I'd even seen one) until I
was served some on a works-outing for Christmas Dinner. On sight, I
assumed they were just more potato (albeit oddly-cut pieces), but th
over-sweet taste caused me to ask a fellow diner what they were.
I still don't like them, though I've been served them many times during
the intervening decades.
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an option in a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
Sounds good.
==
Plenty of parsnips on the stores here in Scotland. I only like them if they
are thoroughly roasted. If not they taste dreadful. I never understood how
people like them boiled.
That is exactly how I feel about parsnips. Well roasted, their sweetness is
nice and welcome (slices of small ones, honey-roasted are absolutely
delicious). But boiled parsnip I just leave where it is (same with boiled
swede) - I can't rescued them with any amount of butter and/or salt.

==

Now swede is a different kettleofish:) I am quite happy with it boiled.
Actually I have never roasted it. Do you roast it the same way as potatoes
and parsnips?
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk
Christie
2017-12-02 16:25:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Up north, parsnips are, in my experience, rarely seen. Yet in London and
the sahf, they are as obligatory in Christmas Dinner as sprouts. I was
31 and had never eaten a parsnip (not sure I'd even seen one) until I
was served some on a works-outing for Christmas Dinner. On sight, I
assumed they were just more potato (albeit oddly-cut pieces), but th
over-sweet taste caused me to ask a fellow diner what they were.
I still don't like them, though I've been served them many times during
the intervening decades.
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an option in a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
Sounds good.
==
Plenty of parsnips on the stores here in Scotland. I only like them if they
are thoroughly roasted. If not they taste dreadful. I never understood how
people like them boiled.
That is exactly how I feel about parsnips. Well roasted, their sweetness is
nice and welcome (slices of small ones, honey-roasted are absolutely
delicious). But boiled parsnip I just leave where it is (same with boiled
swede) - I can't rescued them with any amount of butter and/or salt.
==
Now swede is a different kettleofish:) I am quite happy with it boiled.
Actually I have never roasted it. Do you roast it the same way as potatoes
and parsnips?
It's something I've never attempted nor even seen. But swede is one of my
Dad's favourites, and for many a year I've faced it with a Sunday dinner.
Always boiled and mashed... I just don't like it.

Anyway, I've just had a quick look online and came across this quite
promising recipe of Delia's (it's got a massively long link that will no
doubt be shredded when posted):

https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan?utm_source=http%3A//www.bing.com/search%3Fq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26qs%3Dn%26form%3DQBLH%26sp%3D-1%26pq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26sc%3D8-13%26sk%3D%26cvid%3D8417D62AABB64FF896B23131CF6E936A&utm_medium=d&utm_campaign=otn&utm_content=recipes/international/european/british/roasted-swede-with-parmesan

I like the quote: "It has been said that even children will eat swede when
it tastes this good." I'm sure this is a vegetable, like sprouts, that I've
been well put-off of as a child and have consequently never come round to
liking. But roasting swede with a bit of cheese might well transform it in
the same way that roasting parsnips makes all the difference.

I'm going to actually buy a swede, try out that recipe and see what it
tastes like - it'll be a complete new experience for me. :)
Ophelia
2017-12-02 16:36:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Up north, parsnips are, in my experience, rarely seen. Yet in London and
the sahf, they are as obligatory in Christmas Dinner as sprouts. I was
31 and had never eaten a parsnip (not sure I'd even seen one) until I
was served some on a works-outing for Christmas Dinner. On sight, I
assumed they were just more potato (albeit oddly-cut pieces), but th
over-sweet taste caused me to ask a fellow diner what they were.
I still don't like them, though I've been served them many times during
the intervening decades.
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an option
in
a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
Sounds good.
==
Plenty of parsnips on the stores here in Scotland. I only like them if they
are thoroughly roasted. If not they taste dreadful. I never understood how
people like them boiled.
That is exactly how I feel about parsnips. Well roasted, their sweetness is
nice and welcome (slices of small ones, honey-roasted are absolutely
delicious). But boiled parsnip I just leave where it is (same with boiled
swede) - I can't rescued them with any amount of butter and/or salt.
==
Now swede is a different kettleofish:) I am quite happy with it boiled.
Actually I have never roasted it. Do you roast it the same way as potatoes
and parsnips?
It's something I've never attempted nor even seen. But swede is one of my
Dad's favourites, and for many a year I've faced it with a Sunday dinner.
Always boiled and mashed... I just don't like it.

Anyway, I've just had a quick look online and came across this quite
promising recipe of Delia's (it's got a massively long link that will no
doubt be shredded when posted):

https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan?utm_source=http%3A//www.bing.com/search%3Fq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26qs%3Dn%26form%3DQBLH%26sp%3D-1%26pq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26sc%3D8-13%26sk%3D%26cvid%3D8417D62AABB64FF896B23131CF6E936A&utm_medium=d&utm_campaign=otn&utm_content=recipes/international/european/british/roasted-swede-with-parmesan

I like the quote: "It has been said that even children will eat swede when
it tastes this good." I'm sure this is a vegetable, like sprouts, that I've
been well put-off of as a child and have consequently never come round to
liking. But roasting swede with a bit of cheese might well transform it in
the same way that roasting parsnips makes all the difference.

I'm going to actually buy a swede, try out that recipe and see what it
tastes like - it'll be a complete new experience for me. :)

==

I just serve it boiled and dressed with plenty of butter and salt. I love
Delia and have all her books .. but not here:)

btw the link works fine:)

I need to have another look through that book.

Thanks for the recipe though, I will try it out when we get home:))

Do report back though if you try it first.
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk
pensive hamster
2017-12-02 17:08:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
"Christie" wrote in message
[...]
Anyway, I've just had a quick look online and came across this quite
promising recipe of Delia's (it's got a massively long link that will no
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan?utm_source=http%3A//www.bing.com/search%3Fq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26qs%3Dn%26form%3DQBLH%26sp%3D-1%26pq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26sc%3D8-13%26sk%3D%26cvid%3D8417D62AABB64FF896B23131CF6E936A&utm_medium=d&utm_campaign=otn&utm_content=recipes/international/european/british/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
I like the quote: "It has been said that even children will eat swede when
it tastes this good." I'm sure this is a vegetable, like sprouts, that I've
been well put-off of as a child and have consequently never come round to
liking. But roasting swede with a bit of cheese might well transform it in
the same way that roasting parsnips makes all the difference.
I'm going to actually buy a swede, try out that recipe and see what it
tastes like - it'll be a complete new experience for me. :)
==
I just serve it boiled and dressed with plenty of butter and salt. I love
Delia and have all her books .. but not here:)
btw the link works fine:)
I need to have another look through that book.
Thanks for the recipe though, I will try it out when we get home:))
Do report back though if you try it first.
To the previous poster, when posting a long link, you can snip
the part including and after the ? That part after is just to give
the website info on where you got the link from.

https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
JNugent
2017-12-02 22:31:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pensive hamster
"Christie" wrote in message
[...]
Anyway, I've just had a quick look online and came across this quite
promising recipe of Delia's (it's got a massively long link that will no
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan?utm_source=http%3A//www.bing.com/search%3Fq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26qs%3Dn%26form%3DQBLH%26sp%3D-1%26pq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26sc%3D8-13%26sk%3D%26cvid%3D8417D62AABB64FF896B23131CF6E936A&utm_medium=d&utm_campaign=otn&utm_content=recipes/international/european/british/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
I like the quote: "It has been said that even children will eat swede when
it tastes this good." I'm sure this is a vegetable, like sprouts, that I've
been well put-off of as a child and have consequently never come round to
liking. But roasting swede with a bit of cheese might well transform it in
the same way that roasting parsnips makes all the difference.
I'm going to actually buy a swede, try out that recipe and see what it
tastes like - it'll be a complete new experience for me. :)
==
I just serve it boiled and dressed with plenty of butter and salt. I love
Delia and have all her books .. but not here:)
btw the link works fine:)
I need to have another look through that book.
Thanks for the recipe though, I will try it out when we get home:))
Do report back though if you try it first.
To the previous poster, when posting a long link, you can snip
the part including and after the ? That part after is just to give
the website info on where you got the link from.
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
This has turned into a most satisfactory thread.
Christie
2017-12-03 11:11:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by pensive hamster
"Christie" wrote in message
[...]
Anyway, I've just had a quick look online and came across this quite
promising recipe of Delia's (it's got a massively long link that will no
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan?utm_source=http%3A//www.bing.com/search%3Fq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26qs%3Dn%26form%3DQBLH%26sp%3D-1%26pq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26sc%3D8-13%26sk%3D%26cvid%3D8417D62AABB64FF896B23131CF6E936A&utm_medium=d&utm_campaign=otn&utm_content=recipes/international/european/british/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
I like the quote: "It has been said that even children will eat swede when
it tastes this good." I'm sure this is a vegetable, like sprouts, that I've
been well put-off of as a child and have consequently never come round to
liking. But roasting swede with a bit of cheese might well transform it in
the same way that roasting parsnips makes all the difference.
I'm going to actually buy a swede, try out that recipe and see what it
tastes like - it'll be a complete new experience for me. :)
==
I just serve it boiled and dressed with plenty of butter and salt. I love
Delia and have all her books .. but not here:)
btw the link works fine:)
I need to have another look through that book.
Thanks for the recipe though, I will try it out when we get home:))
Do report back though if you try it first.
To the previous poster, when posting a long link, you can snip
the part including and after the ? That part after is just to give
the website info on where you got the link from.
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
This has turned into a most satisfactory thread.
:) Who'd have thought root vegetables could be such fun?
Christie
2017-12-03 11:01:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pensive hamster
"Christie" wrote in message
[...]
Anyway, I've just had a quick look online and came across this quite
promising recipe of Delia's (it's got a massively long link that will no
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan?utm_source=http%3A//www.bing.com/search%3Fq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26qs%3Dn%26form%3DQBLH%26sp%3D-1%26pq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26sc%3D8-13%26sk%3D%26cvid%3D8417D62AABB64FF896B23131CF6E936A&utm_medium=d&utm_campaign=otn&utm_content=recipes/international/european/british/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
I like the quote: "It has been said that even children will eat swede when
it tastes this good." I'm sure this is a vegetable, like sprouts, that I've
been well put-off of as a child and have consequently never come round to
liking. But roasting swede with a bit of cheese might well transform it in
the same way that roasting parsnips makes all the difference.
I'm going to actually buy a swede, try out that recipe and see what it
tastes like - it'll be a complete new experience for me. :)
==
I just serve it boiled and dressed with plenty of butter and salt. I love
Delia and have all her books .. but not here:)
btw the link works fine:)
I need to have another look through that book.
Thanks for the recipe though, I will try it out when we get home:))
Do report back though if you try it first.
To the previous poster, when posting a long link, you can snip
the part including and after the ? That part after is just to give
the website info on where you got the link from.
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
Yes, the shortened link still works perfectly.

That is a very useful bit of information. Which I appreciate you passing on
- next time I have a ridiculously long link to post containing a similarly
positioned '?', I'll be able to deal with it better.
Christie
2017-12-03 10:56:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
...
Post by Ophelia
Now swede is a different kettleofish:) I am quite happy with it boiled.
Actually I have never roasted it. Do you roast it the same way as potatoes
and parsnips?
It's something I've never attempted nor even seen. But swede is one of my
Dad's favourites, and for many a year I've faced it with a Sunday dinner.
Always boiled and mashed... I just don't like it.
Anyway, I've just had a quick look online and came across this quite
promising recipe of Delia's (it's got a massively long link that will no
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/occasions/christmas/christmas-vegetables/roasted-swede-with-parmesan?utm_source=http%3A//www.bing.com/search%3Fq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26qs%3Dn%26form%3DQBLH%26sp%3D-1%26pq%3Droasted%2Bswede%26sc%3D8-13%26sk%3D%26cvid%3D8417D62AABB64FF896B23131CF6E936A&utm_medium=d&utm_campaign=otn&utm_content=recipes/international/european/british/roasted-swede-with-parmesan
I like the quote: "It has been said that even children will eat swede when
it tastes this good." I'm sure this is a vegetable, like sprouts, that I've
been well put-off of as a child and have consequently never come round to
liking. But roasting swede with a bit of cheese might well transform it in
the same way that roasting parsnips makes all the difference.
I'm going to actually buy a swede, try out that recipe and see what it
tastes like - it'll be a complete new experience for me. :)
==
I just serve it boiled and dressed with plenty of butter and salt. I love
Delia and have all her books .. but not here:)
btw the link works fine:)
I need to have another look through that book.
Thanks for the recipe though, I will try it out when we get home:))
Do report back though if you try it first.
Certainly! I can hardly believe that I'm positively looking forward to
giving swede another go. And it's in no small measure down to you, many
thanks. :))
kat
2017-12-02 23:20:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts.  :)
Here's another.
I suppose there must be quite a few of you about really because how else
would sprouts continue to be an almost obligatory vegetable option with the
Christmas dinner? But it remains one of the few vegetables that haven't been
able to 'grow into', even after making an effort to do so.
Up north, parsnips are, in my experience, rarely seen. Yet in London and
the sahf, they are as obligatory in Christmas Dinner as sprouts. I was
31 and had never eaten a parsnip (not sure I'd even seen one) until I
was served some on a works-outing for Christmas Dinner. On sight, I
assumed they were just more potato (albeit oddly-cut pieces), but th
over-sweet taste caused me to ask a fellow diner what they were.
I still don't like them, though I've been served them many times during
the intervening decades.
Post by Christie
Post by JNugent
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
Same with me, I also have never like those cabbages - and I don't think
that's ever going to change.
Post by JNugent
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
Same with me again. I like white cabbage (and red) shredded in salads. And
I've even got into eating cooked white cabbage which I've found can be a
nice change presented in a dinner. It's usually available as an
option in
a
close by Toby Carvery and when eating there I always scoop up some of that
to add to my plate now.
Sounds good.
==
Plenty of parsnips on the stores here in Scotland.  I only like them
if they
are thoroughly roasted. If not they taste dreadful.  I never
understood how
people like them boiled.
That is exactly how I feel about parsnips. Well roasted, their sweetness is
nice and welcome (slices of small ones, honey-roasted are absolutely
delicious).  But boiled parsnip I just leave where it is (same with boiled
swede) - I can't rescued them with any amount of butter and/or salt.
==
Now swede is a different kettleofish:)  I am quite happy with it boiled.
Actually I have never roasted it.  Do you roast it the same way as
potatoes and parsnips?
I grew up on mashed neeps, something else that was so-so back then,
though I like it now. I would roast them the same way, but I might try
that Delia recipe in another post and see if mr kat is happier with
that. It looks good.
--
kat
Post by Christie
^..^<
Yellow
2017-12-02 18:24:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
I like cabbage raw in salads too. Adds a bit of crunch.
kat
2017-12-02 23:11:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
I like cabbage raw in salads too. Adds a bit of crunch.
I just like cabbage. I didn't, as a child, like it or dislike it, but
even then I loved sprouts.
--
kat
Post by Yellow
^..^<
Yellow
2017-12-02 23:32:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by kat
Post by Yellow
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Yellow
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:03:40 +0000, Christie
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried or roasted
potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Best bit!!!
The unfortunate truth is I need to save as many calories as I can for my
sugar addiction.
Post by Yellow
Along with the sprouts.
I just knew that if I waited long enough I'd find someone who actually liked
sprouts. :)
Here's another.
I am, however, not at all fond of the various dark cabbages. I've never
liked cabbage.
But white cabbage is good - uncooked, of course - in salads.
I like cabbage raw in salads too. Adds a bit of crunch.
I just like cabbage. I didn't, as a child, like it or dislike it, but
even then I loved sprouts.
I liked sprouts as a kid too which always amused my parents.
kat
2017-12-03 12:37:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Yellow
Post by kat
I just like cabbage. I didn't, as a child, like it or dislike it, but
even then I loved sprouts.
I liked sprouts as a kid too which always amused my parents.
My dad grew them, and as far as I know wasn't amused by my liking them
so much as my calling them "doll's cabbages". :-)
--
kat
Post by Yellow
^..^<
pamela
2017-11-30 17:32:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year
and the restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on
the plate uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried
or roasted potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Is that 'starch pile' from some diet?
Christie
2017-12-01 12:54:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year
and the restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on
the plate uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of fried
or roasted potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Is that 'starch pile' from some diet?
Just my own, really - I can usually control my weight mainly by managing the
carbohydrate foods in my diet. And to do that, I count and restrict my
intake of carbohydrate calories. Most of the goodies I find the hardest to
resist are in the carbohydrate food group and I simply can't sustain too low
a carb diet for any length of time. But if I balance the carbs that I allow
myself to eat, the rest of my diet seems to take care if itself.

Then, if I let things occasionally lapse, I have to restore the situation by
also incorporating - for a limited period - the 5:2 diet, where you quite
strictly reduce your calorie intake on any two days of the week so that on
the other 5 you can eat more freely (without going mad, of course). So, I
can I have a fairly indulgent Christmas knowing that I already have a
contingency plan in place. :)
pamela
2017-12-01 16:50:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christie
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year
and the restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on
the plate uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of
fried or roasted potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Is that 'starch pile' from some diet?
Just my own, really - I can usually control my weight mainly by
managing the carbohydrate foods in my diet. And to do that, I
count and restrict my intake of carbohydrate calories. Most of
the goodies I find the hardest to resist are in the carbohydrate
food group and I simply can't sustain too low a carb diet for
any length of time. But if I balance the carbs that I allow
myself to eat, the rest of my diet seems to take care if itself.
Then, if I let things occasionally lapse, I have to restore the
situation by also incorporating - for a limited period - the 5:2
diet, where you quite strictly reduce your calorie intake on any
two days of the week so that on the other 5 you can eat more
freely (without going mad, of course). So, I can I have a
fairly indulgent Christmas knowing that I already have a
contingency plan in place. :)
Sounds like there's not much room for chocolate in your diet. I
think I will pass. :)
Christie
2017-12-01 17:42:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year
and the restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on
the plate uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of
fried or roasted potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Is that 'starch pile' from some diet?
Just my own, really - I can usually control my weight mainly by
managing the carbohydrate foods in my diet. And to do that, I
count and restrict my intake of carbohydrate calories. Most of
the goodies I find the hardest to resist are in the carbohydrate
food group and I simply can't sustain too low a carb diet for
any length of time. But if I balance the carbs that I allow
myself to eat, the rest of my diet seems to take care if itself.
Then, if I let things occasionally lapse, I have to restore the
situation by also incorporating - for a limited period - the 5:2
diet, where you quite strictly reduce your calorie intake on any
two days of the week so that on the other 5 you can eat more
freely (without going mad, of course). So, I can I have a
fairly indulgent Christmas knowing that I already have a
contingency plan in place. :)
Sounds like there's not much room for chocolate in your diet. I
think I will pass. :)
Lol! Oh, I get by, don't worry.
kat
2017-12-02 23:12:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year
and the restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on
the plate uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of
fried or roasted potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Is that 'starch pile' from some diet?
Just my own, really - I can usually control my weight mainly by
managing the carbohydrate foods in my diet. And to do that, I
count and restrict my intake of carbohydrate calories. Most of
the goodies I find the hardest to resist are in the carbohydrate
food group and I simply can't sustain too low a carb diet for
any length of time. But if I balance the carbs that I allow
myself to eat, the rest of my diet seems to take care if itself.
Then, if I let things occasionally lapse, I have to restore the
situation by also incorporating - for a limited period - the 5:2
diet, where you quite strictly reduce your calorie intake on any
two days of the week so that on the other 5 you can eat more
freely (without going mad, of course). So, I can I have a
fairly indulgent Christmas knowing that I already have a
contingency plan in place. :)
Sounds like there's not much room for chocolate in your diet. I
think I will pass. :)
Every diet should find room for chocolate!
--
kat
Post by pamela
^..^<
pamela
2017-12-02 23:50:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by kat
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by pamela
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
In message
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last
year and the restaurant has been booked for the last two
months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left
on the plate uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Well, at least that makes the washing up easier.
If applicable, I always leave a 'starch pile' (portions of
fried or roasted potatoes and all sorts of breads).
Is that 'starch pile' from some diet?
Just my own, really - I can usually control my weight mainly
by managing the carbohydrate foods in my diet. And to do that,
I count and restrict my intake of carbohydrate calories. Most
of the goodies I find the hardest to resist are in the
carbohydrate food group and I simply can't sustain too low a
carb diet for any length of time. But if I balance the carbs
that I allow myself to eat, the rest of my diet seems to take
care if itself.
Then, if I let things occasionally lapse, I have to restore
the situation by also incorporating - for a limited period -
the 5:2 diet, where you quite strictly reduce your calorie
intake on any two days of the week so that on the other 5 you
can eat more freely (without going mad, of course). So, I can
I have a fairly indulgent Christmas knowing that I already
have a contingency plan in place. :)
Sounds like there's not much room for chocolate in your diet. I
think I will pass. :)
Every diet should find room for chocolate!
In fact a chocolate-only diet would be ideal.
kat
2017-12-03 12:31:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by kat
Post by pamela
Sounds like there's not much room for chocolate in your diet. I
think I will pass. :)
Every diet should find room for chocolate!
In fact a chocolate-only diet would be ideal.
An interesting thought. For, much as I love chocolate, I can only eat
in a little at a time without feeling a little sick. ( Unlike my late
mother-in-law, known to devour half a box of Thorntons Continental in
one sitting - and I don't mean a small box. ) Especially as I prefer the
dark, strong flavoured types.

This could be a very good way of controlling weight!
--
kat
Post by pamela
^..^<
pamela
2017-12-03 12:46:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by kat
Post by pamela
Post by kat
Post by pamela
Sounds like there's not much room for chocolate in your diet.
I think I will pass. :)
Every diet should find room for chocolate!
In fact a chocolate-only diet would be ideal.
An interesting thought. For, much as I love chocolate, I can
only eat in a little at a time without feeling a little sick.
I've seen those "chocolate nibbler" folks who have literally two
squares and then declare themselves full. I can't understand it.
Post by kat
(Unlike my late mother-in-law, known to devour half a box of
Thorntons Continental in one sitting - and I don't mean a small
box.)
Ah, she's my heroine! Large quantities of chocolate.
Post by kat
Especially as I prefer the dark, strong flavoured types.
This could be a very good way of controlling weight!
kat
2017-12-03 23:49:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pamela
Post by kat
Post by pamela
Post by kat
Post by pamela
Sounds like there's not much room for chocolate in your diet.
I think I will pass. :)
Every diet should find room for chocolate!
In fact a chocolate-only diet would be ideal.
An interesting thought. For, much as I love chocolate, I can
only eat in a little at a time without feeling a little sick.
I've seen those "chocolate nibbler" folks who have literally two
squares and then declare themselves full. I can't understand it.
Not full by any means, but one more chocolate and I feel sick. Goes
back to the eve of my son's birth when I scoffed a Very Large bar of
Dairy Milk, along with some orange juice, and felt not too good
after.:-) Though I suspect I was filling up on energy for what was to
come!
Post by pamela
Post by kat
(Unlike my late mother-in-law, known to devour half a box of
Thorntons Continental in one sitting - and I don't mean a small
box.)
Ah, she's my heroine! Large quantities of chocolate.
Post by kat
Especially as I prefer the dark, strong flavoured types.
This could be a very good way of controlling weight!
--
kat
Post by pamela
^..^<
Lancer
2017-11-30 09:31:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Even if bloated?

An image of Mr Creosote just came to mind... Ewwww!
JNugent
2017-12-01 15:29:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Even in the USA?
Ian Jackson
2017-12-01 15:46:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Even in the USA?
Especially in the USA!
--
Ian
JNugent
2017-12-01 17:13:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by JNugent
Post by Christie
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
Good! That means that you don't have to leave so much left on the plate
uneaten.
 I don't understand that concept. I always clear my plate.
Even in the USA?
Especially in the USA!
Respect...
Yellow
2017-11-29 20:53:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 13:40:58 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Yellow
Our Christmas dinner is the same price as it was last year and the
restaurant has been booked for the last two months.
But you might be getting smaller portions!
I guess that is an option but as we are fit to burst after the usual
meal it would be little hardship.

What is interesting though is that every year except one, our usual
restaurant has been packed on Christmas day. The year it wasn't being
the Christmas after the crash so I guess that would have been 2008.

Will the restaurant be full this year, or will there be empty seats? It
will be quite telling in my view.
MM
2017-11-30 10:07:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
and the Mirror
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when they said it would cost them.
Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food etc."...
Yup, everything's Brexit's fault.
"Rise in the cost of vegetables has led to the increase"
"There is no obvious reason why veg should be more expensive this year.
In fact, British crops have been good and the wholesale prices paid to
farmers are lower than a year ago."
Just because the reason may not seem obvious to you or the Daily Mail,
it may be quite apparent to farmers, wholesalers and retailers. For
example, the cost of fuel is now higher. And *whatever* the reason,
you still have to pay the highers prices, or go without.

MM
BurfordTJustice
2017-11-29 14:21:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Why would anyone but the Dole whores give a shit??





"R. Mark Clayton" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message news:5e1af71f-61d2-4b84-ac0b-***@googlegroups.com...
: It seems Xmas is going to be a whole load more expensive this year.
:
: I read it in the Daily Mail so it must be true: -
:
:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5123153/Why-years-Christmas-dinner-16-expensive.htmlac
:
: and the Mirror
:
:
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/inflation-brexit-push-up-cost-11602772
:
: pity all those poor Leave voters who didn't believe the 'experts' when
they said it would cost them.
:
: Still no doubt some Brextremist will soon be along to say "Xmas - bah
humbug! People can easily manage without Xmas, alcoholic drinks, food
etc."...
Loading...