Discussion:
Poison eggs from EUSSR
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harry
2017-08-06 07:29:07 UTC
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-40841411
R. Mark Clayton
2017-08-07 19:12:38 UTC
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Post by harry
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-40841411
Terrible - is it as bad as BSE?
MM
2017-08-08 06:52:32 UTC
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The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-08 08:27:25 UTC
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Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.

Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.

But we don't buy our eggs yearly. We buy them, use them and most
probably import them, *weekly*. It's reasonable in my view to assume
that the 20,000 contaminated eggs all came in in one batch in one week.
If that is so, the proportion of contaminated eggs sold and eaten in
that week was actually 20,000 in 240 million, or one in every 12,000 or so.

Given that the per capita consumption of eggs in the UK is 3.7 per week,
the chances of any one person consuming a contaminated egg was 3.7 in
12,000 or one person in every 3250.

The simple way of looking at it, assuming the contaminated eggs were
uniformly distributed amongst the uncontaminated eggs, is that about
20,000 people would have consumed the 20,000 contaminated eggs and may
be suffering the consequences.

Why didn't he say that instead of blustering?
R. Mark Clayton
2017-08-08 10:05:46 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
But we don't buy our eggs yearly. We buy them, use them and most
probably import them, *weekly*. It's reasonable in my view to assume
that the 20,000 contaminated eggs all came in in one batch in one week.
If that is so, the proportion of contaminated eggs sold and eaten in
that week was actually 20,000 in 240 million, or one in every 12,000 or so.
Given that the per capita consumption of eggs in the UK is 3.7 per week,
the chances of any one person consuming a contaminated egg was 3.7 in
12,000 or one person in every 3250.
The simple way of looking at it, assuming the contaminated eggs were
uniformly distributed amongst the uncontaminated eggs, is that about
20,000 people would have consumed the 20,000 contaminated eggs and may
be suffering the consequences.
Why didn't he say that instead of blustering?
so a probability of 0.00000159 instead of 0.000001, gosh I am worried.

Perhaps more relevant to the risk is that eggs are not sold singly, but in boxes of six or more, so anyone who bought will have likely eaten more than one. OTOH I suspect such low quality eggs will have been used in food preparation - e.g. making cakes etc. so actually the risk will be more spread out.
Norman Wells
2017-08-08 10:48:30 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
But we don't buy our eggs yearly. We buy them, use them and most
probably import them, *weekly*. It's reasonable in my view to assume
that the 20,000 contaminated eggs all came in in one batch in one week.
If that is so, the proportion of contaminated eggs sold and eaten in
that week was actually 20,000 in 240 million, or one in every 12,000 or so.
Given that the per capita consumption of eggs in the UK is 3.7 per week,
the chances of any one person consuming a contaminated egg was 3.7 in
12,000 or one person in every 3250.
The simple way of looking at it, assuming the contaminated eggs were
uniformly distributed amongst the uncontaminated eggs, is that about
20,000 people would have consumed the 20,000 contaminated eggs and may
be suffering the consequences.
Why didn't he say that instead of blustering?
so a probability of 0.00000159 instead of 0.000001, gosh I am worried.
We're perhaps lucky that the contaminant was levamisole and not
something fatal, which it could have been. Had there been 20,000
deaths, I think you might have been rather more concerned. So might
everyone, and with some justification.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Perhaps more relevant to the risk is that eggs are not sold singly, but in boxes of six or more, so anyone who bought will have likely eaten more than one. OTOH I suspect such low quality eggs will have been used in food preparation - e.g. making cakes etc. so actually the risk will be more spread out.
Who says they were 'low quality'?
R. Mark Clayton
2017-08-10 12:45:27 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
But we don't buy our eggs yearly. We buy them, use them and most
probably import them, *weekly*. It's reasonable in my view to assume
that the 20,000 contaminated eggs all came in in one batch in one week.
If that is so, the proportion of contaminated eggs sold and eaten in
that week was actually 20,000 in 240 million, or one in every 12,000 or so.
Given that the per capita consumption of eggs in the UK is 3.7 per week,
the chances of any one person consuming a contaminated egg was 3.7 in
12,000 or one person in every 3250.
The simple way of looking at it, assuming the contaminated eggs were
uniformly distributed amongst the uncontaminated eggs, is that about
20,000 people would have consumed the 20,000 contaminated eggs and may
be suffering the consequences.
Why didn't he say that instead of blustering?
so a probability of 0.00000159 instead of 0.000001, gosh I am worried.
Actually 700k so more significant number.
Post by Norman Wells
We're perhaps lucky that the contaminant was levamisole and not
something fatal, which it could have been. Had there been 20,000
deaths, I think you might have been rather more concerned. So might
everyone, and with some justification.
I think something like cyanide would have been picked up rather quickly as people succumbed to the effects...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Perhaps more relevant to the risk is that eggs are not sold singly, but in boxes of six or more, so anyone who bought will have likely eaten more than one. OTOH I suspect such low quality eggs will have been used in food preparation - e.g. making cakes etc. so actually the risk will be more spread out.
Who says they were 'low quality'?
I did, but it was an educated guess. As it turns out:-

'
The FSA says that in the UK, the Dutch eggs were used in processed foods with many other ingredients - mostly sandwich fillings or other chilled foods.

"While in some European countries eggs containing Fipronil residues have been sold as fresh eggs, in the UK this is not the case. Many of the eggs involved were mixed with other eggs which have not come from affected farms, so Fipronil residues will be highly diluted."
'
Norman Wells
2017-08-10 13:18:19 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
But we don't buy our eggs yearly. We buy them, use them and most
probably import them, *weekly*. It's reasonable in my view to assume
that the 20,000 contaminated eggs all came in in one batch in one week.
If that is so, the proportion of contaminated eggs sold and eaten in
that week was actually 20,000 in 240 million, or one in every 12,000 or so.
Given that the per capita consumption of eggs in the UK is 3.7 per week,
the chances of any one person consuming a contaminated egg was 3.7 in
12,000 or one person in every 3250.
The simple way of looking at it, assuming the contaminated eggs were
uniformly distributed amongst the uncontaminated eggs, is that about
20,000 people would have consumed the 20,000 contaminated eggs and may
be suffering the consequences.
Why didn't he say that instead of blustering?
so a probability of 0.00000159 instead of 0.000001, gosh I am worried.
Actually 700k so more significant number.
Post by Norman Wells
We're perhaps lucky that the contaminant was levamisole and not
something fatal, which it could have been. Had there been 20,000
deaths, I think you might have been rather more concerned. So might
everyone, and with some justification.
I think something like cyanide would have been picked up rather quickly as people succumbed to the effects...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Perhaps more relevant to the risk is that eggs are not sold singly, but in boxes of six or more, so anyone who bought will have likely eaten more than one. OTOH I suspect such low quality eggs will have been used in food preparation - e.g. making cakes etc. so actually the risk will be more spread out.
Who says they were 'low quality'?
I did, but it was an educated guess. As it turns out:-
'
The FSA says that in the UK, the Dutch eggs were used in processed foods with many other ingredients - mostly sandwich fillings or other chilled foods.
I'm not sure we should be taking anything the FSA says at face value.
It's covering its arse and trying to minimise a very serious incident.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
"While in some European countries eggs containing Fipronil residues have been sold as fresh eggs, in the UK this is not the case. Many of the eggs involved were mixed with other eggs which have not come from affected farms, so Fipronil residues will be highly diluted."
But it doesn't say much for EU methods of poultry farming or the safety
of its products.

Those who have tried to convince us that they're somehow superior to
those in the USA have a bit of explaining to do.
Michael D Mitchell
2017-08-10 13:24:47 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
'
The FSA says that in the UK, the Dutch eggs were used in processed foods
with many other ingredients - mostly sandwich fillings or other chilled
foods.
I'm not sure we should be taking anything the FSA says at face value.
It's covering its arse and trying to minimise a very serious incident.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
"While in some European countries eggs containing Fipronil residues have
been sold as fresh eggs, in the UK this is not the case. Many of the eggs
involved were mixed with other eggs which have not come from affected
farms, so Fipronil residues will be highly diluted."
But it doesn't say much for EU methods of poultry farming or the safety
of its products.

Those who have tried to convince us that they're somehow superior to
those in the USA have a bit of explaining to do.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-40889414

Nuff Said.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-08-10 13:54:01 UTC
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SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Who says they were 'low quality'?
I did, but it was an educated guess. As it turns out:-
'
The FSA says that in the UK, the Dutch eggs were used in processed foods with many other ingredients - mostly sandwich fillings or other chilled foods.
I'm not sure we should be taking anything the FSA says at face value.
It's covering its arse and trying to minimise a very serious incident.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
"While in some European countries eggs containing Fipronil residues have been sold as fresh eggs, in the UK this is not the case. Many of the eggs involved were mixed with other eggs which have not come from affected farms, so Fipronil residues will be highly diluted."
But it doesn't say much for EU methods of poultry farming or the safety
of its products.
Those who have tried to convince us that they're somehow superior to
those in the USA have a bit of explaining to do.
Three important differences: -

1. The eggs involved are a minute fraction of UK consumption.
2. The treatment involved here is illegal EU , whereas dosing animals for human consumption with anti-biotics and hormones is perfectly.
3. The cheats have been caught, as indeed was someone swapping horse for beef, although at least this is no threat to human health, but they still got eight years between them: -
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/horsemeat-beef-pass-off-two-men-jailed-andronicus-sideras-ulrik-nielsen-food-a7869396.html
Norman Wells
2017-08-10 15:15:39 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Who says they were 'low quality'?
I did, but it was an educated guess. As it turns out:-
'
The FSA says that in the UK, the Dutch eggs were used in processed foods with many other ingredients - mostly sandwich fillings or other chilled foods.
I'm not sure we should be taking anything the FSA says at face value.
It's covering its arse and trying to minimise a very serious incident.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
"While in some European countries eggs containing Fipronil residues have been sold as fresh eggs, in the UK this is not the case. Many of the eggs involved were mixed with other eggs which have not come from affected farms, so Fipronil residues will be highly diluted."
But it doesn't say much for EU methods of poultry farming or the safety
of its products.
Those who have tried to convince us that they're somehow superior to
those in the USA have a bit of explaining to do.
Three important differences: -
1. The eggs involved are a minute fraction of UK consumption.
Over a year, maybe. Even more minute over a decade. But they weren't
imported over a year or a decade. The presumably came in over a week or
so, in which case, in that week, it was a much higher proportion..

Nevertheless, 700,000 eggs could mean 700,000 poisoned people. It's
hardly trivial.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
2. The treatment involved here is illegal EU , whereas dosing animals for human consumption with anti-biotics and hormones is perfectly.
Whether it is illegal or not, the EU did not prevent it happening.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
3. The cheats have been caught,
What, all of them?

How many does it take to produce the 700,000 eggs that came into the UK,
plus the 10,000,000 estimated to have entered Germany, plus all the
millions that went elsewhere?

The scale is massive, it's in the EU, and it's a disgrace.
R. Mark Clayton
2017-08-10 16:05:02 UTC
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SNIP
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
I'm not sure we should be taking anything the FSA says at face value.
It's covering its arse and trying to minimise a very serious incident.
Post by R. Mark Clayton
"While in some European countries eggs containing Fipronil residues have been sold as fresh eggs, in the UK this is not the case. Many of the eggs involved were mixed with other eggs which have not come from affected farms, so Fipronil residues will be highly diluted."
But it doesn't say much for EU methods of poultry farming or the safety
of its products.
Those who have tried to convince us that they're somehow superior to
those in the USA have a bit of explaining to do.
Three important differences: -
1. The eggs involved are a minute fraction of UK consumption.
Over a year, maybe. Even more minute over a decade. But they weren't
imported over a year or a decade. The presumably came in over a week or
so, in which case, in that week, it was a much higher proportion..
Seems likely it was months.
Post by Norman Wells
Nevertheless, 700,000 eggs could mean 700,000 poisoned people. It's
hardly trivial.
It could, but the amount is significant. If you drink 10ml of alcohol there will be virtually no effect, if you drink 100ml of alcohol there will be considerable effect and some people would be ill. If you drink 1,000ml of alcohol you will die.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
2. The treatment involved here is illegal EU , whereas dosing animals for human consumption with anti-biotics and hormones is perfectly.
Whether it is illegal or not, the EU did not prevent it happening.
Not immediately, as with all crime it had to be detected. Slightly different from it being legal in the first place.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by R. Mark Clayton
3. The cheats have been caught,
What, all of them?
How many does it take to produce the 700,000 eggs that came into the UK,
plus the 10,000,000 estimated to have entered Germany, plus all the
millions that went elsewhere?
The scale is massive, it's in the EU, and it's a disgrace.
In numbers it is, but as a proportion even 10M eggs is less than 1% of UK consumption, let alone EU production. It is a disgrace, but not as big a disgrace as it being perfectly legal in the first place.

Bizarrely your argument seems to be that because some food cheats have been caught in the EU it should be OK to import hormone laden and potentially MRSA infected food from the USA - strange logic.
Norman Wells
2017-08-10 16:18:36 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Bizarrely your argument seems to be that because some food cheats have been caught in the EU it should be OK to import hormone laden and potentially MRSA infected food from the USA - strange logic.
What's wrong with 'hormone laden' food, by which I guess you mean beef?

Cattle are naturally hormone laden. It's what makes them grow. A
little boost makes them grow more and become more efficient meat
producers. It's probably exactly what breeders have been trying to
achieve, with some success, over the last couple of centuries. And the
amount you're likely to consume in your burger will be absolutely miniscule.

As regards 'potentially MRSA infected food', I don't know what you think
the difference is between current farming practices there and here.
There's plenty of antibiotic use in animals in the EU too.
MM
2017-08-09 06:30:47 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Why would he lie? What purpose would it serve? What would he gain by
lying?

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-09 08:01:43 UTC
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Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Why would he lie? What purpose would it serve? What would he gain by
lying?
He's from the Food Standards Agency. What on earth do you think his
main responsibility is?

He's trying to minimise a potentially very serious incident in order to
excuse his agency's failings and deflect attention from them.
MM
2017-08-10 10:30:38 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Why would he lie? What purpose would it serve? What would he gain by
lying?
He's from the Food Standards Agency. What on earth do you think his
main responsibility is?
Er, maintaining food standards, perhaps?
Post by Norman Wells
He's trying to minimise a potentially very serious incident in order to
excuse his agency's failings and deflect attention from them.
It's only you who claim it's a "potentially very serious incident". In
fact, I think you're trying to scaremonger. All he's doing is calming
the crowd after some idiot has shouted "Fire!" in a packed cinema.

I'll leave you to work out who the idiot is.

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-10 11:23:16 UTC
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Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
The spokesman for the Food Standards Agency was on Sky News a few
minutes ago and he said that the number of these contaminated eggs
imported to the UK was around 20,000 This equates to around 1 egg in 1
million eggs that ~may~ be contaminated. Furthermore, he said, the
likelihood of anyone suffering any after-effects of eating one is very
small.
No, he's misuing statistics to lie.
Why would he lie? What purpose would it serve? What would he gain by
lying?
He's from the Food Standards Agency. What on earth do you think his
main responsibility is?
Er, maintaining food standards, perhaps?
Post by Norman Wells
He's trying to minimise a potentially very serious incident in order to
excuse his agency's failings and deflect attention from them.
It's only you who claim it's a "potentially very serious incident". In
fact, I think you're trying to scaremonger. All he's doing is calming
the crowd after some idiot has shouted "Fire!" in a packed cinema.
I'll leave you to work out who the idiot is.
Yes, of course.

Latest news:

"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."

"a regional agriculture minister, Christian Meyer of Lower Saxony, told
ZDF public television it was now believed 10 million contaminated eggs
might have reached Germany."

"Authorities in Belgium, Switzerland and Sweden also said they were
tracking shipments and removing eggs, as the impact of the affair widened."

"With losses expected to run into millions of euros, it is another blow
for Dutch poultry farmers"

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/05/aldi-pulls-dutch-eggs-in-germany-as-insecticide-scandal-widens

But it's only scaremongering, isn't it?
MM
2017-08-11 07:52:06 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-11 08:49:33 UTC
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Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.
Did I say they did?

It's an EU scandal and EU-wide.
MM
2017-08-11 13:54:50 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.
Did I say they did?
It's an EU scandal and EU-wide.
We are in the EU, therefore it's not EU-wide.

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-11 14:14:05 UTC
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Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.
Did I say they did?
It's an EU scandal and EU-wide.
We are in the EU, therefore it's not EU-wide.
There were 700,000 contaminated eggs in the UK, 10,000,000 in Germany,
millions elsewhere in the EU. How can you claim it's not an EU scandal
nor EU-wide?
R. Mark Clayton
2017-08-11 14:38:56 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.
Did I say they did?
It's an EU scandal and EU-wide.
We are in the EU, therefore it's not EU-wide.
There were 700,000 contaminated eggs in the UK, 10,000,000 in Germany,
millions elsewhere in the EU. How can you claim it's not an EU scandal
nor EU-wide?
Apparently it is going world wide with the eggs sold all over: -
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/11/tainted-eggs-found-in-hong-kong-switzerland-and-15-eu-countries

Radioactive Welsh mutton anyone: -
https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2009/dec/29/sheep-farmers-chernobyl-meat-restricted
or milk
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windscale_fire#Health_effects
Norman Wells
2017-08-11 14:52:04 UTC
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Post by R. Mark Clayton
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.
Did I say they did?
It's an EU scandal and EU-wide.
We are in the EU, therefore it's not EU-wide.
There were 700,000 contaminated eggs in the UK, 10,000,000 in Germany,
millions elsewhere in the EU. How can you claim it's not an EU scandal
nor EU-wide?
Apparently it is going world wide with the eggs sold all over: -
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/11/tainted-eggs-found-in-hong-kong-switzerland-and-15-eu-countries
Soon it will be chickens and eggs *only* from the USA that are safe to eat.

It certainly puts an end to all those 'EU standards of production are so
much higher than in the US' arguments, doesn't it?

In fact it makes chlorine-washed chicken sound positively good.
MM
2017-08-16 07:06:08 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.
Did I say they did?
It's an EU scandal and EU-wide.
We are in the EU, therefore it's not EU-wide.
There were 700,000 contaminated eggs in the UK, 10,000,000 in Germany,
millions elsewhere in the EU. How can you claim it's not an EU scandal
nor EU-wide?
All shell eggs sold in British supermarkets are Lion eggs that are
guaranteed to have been laid in the UK. The so-called "contaminated"
eggs are used in food processing, and a number of supermarkets have
removed egg mayonnaise and similar products from the shelves as a
precaution.

You don't need to worry, and you don't need to spread fear across the
nation, either. You don't give a damn about the eggs or people's
health; you're just using this to beat the EU with.

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-16 07:55:43 UTC
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Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
"Discount supermarket Aldi said on Friday it was pulling all Dutch eggs
from its shelves in Germany over an insecticide scandal that has spread
to food stores across Europe."
Aldi UK don't sell Dutch eggs.
Did I say they did?
It's an EU scandal and EU-wide.
We are in the EU, therefore it's not EU-wide.
There were 700,000 contaminated eggs in the UK, 10,000,000 in Germany,
millions elsewhere in the EU. How can you claim it's not an EU scandal
nor EU-wide?
All shell eggs sold in British supermarkets are Lion eggs that are
guaranteed to have been laid in the UK.
No, they're not all Lion eggs unless they've changed their policies
since the scandal.
Post by MM
The so-called "contaminated"
eggs are used in food processing, and a number of supermarkets have
removed egg mayonnaise and similar products from the shelves as a
precaution.
Only after they knew about the EU eggs scandal. I imagine many of them
were and probably still are in the food chain.
Post by MM
You don't need to worry, and you don't need to spread fear across the
nation, either.
It's not me doing it. It's happening because of what it is.
Post by MM
You don't give a damn about the eggs or people's
health; you're just using this to beat the EU with.
It's an EU scandal. It can't even safeguard our food supplies.

And it's yet another reason to leave.

MM
2017-08-11 07:52:44 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
But it's only scaremongering, isn't it?
When you're involved, yes. Thanks for admitting it.

MM

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MM
2017-08-09 06:31:29 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
Nit-picking.

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-09 08:06:36 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
Nit-picking.
That depends on whether you think deliberately inflating a figure by
nearly 60% is nit-picking or symptomatic of an even greater desire to
mislead.

The fact, though, is that 20,000 contaminated eggs entered the food
supply that the Food Standards Agency is supposed to protect. Had they
been contaminated with something fatal, we could have be looking at up
to 20,000 deaths.

Is that nit-picking too?
MM
2017-08-10 10:31:58 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
Nit-picking.
That depends on whether you think deliberately inflating a figure by
nearly 60% is nit-picking or symptomatic of an even greater desire to
mislead.
The fact, though, is that 20,000 contaminated eggs entered the food
supply that the Food Standards Agency is supposed to protect. Had they
been contaminated with something fatal, we could have be looking at up
to 20,000 deaths.
Is that nit-picking too?
Yes. Just more scaremongering from your very good self.

MM

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Norman Wells
2017-08-10 11:28:34 UTC
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Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
Nit-picking.
That depends on whether you think deliberately inflating a figure by
nearly 60% is nit-picking or symptomatic of an even greater desire to
mislead.
The fact, though, is that 20,000 contaminated eggs entered the food
supply that the Food Standards Agency is supposed to protect. Had they
been contaminated with something fatal, we could have be looking at up
to 20,000 deaths.
Is that nit-picking too?
Yes. Just more scaremongering from your very good self.
Sure. That's why:

"Millions of eggs have been recalled from shops and warehouses in
Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany in recent weeks after some were
found to contain high levels of the insecticide fipronil, a common
ingredient in veterinary products for getting rid of fleas, lice and ticks."

"According to the World Health Organization, the toxic substance can
damage the liver, thyroid glands and kidneys"

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/07/eggs-contaminated-with-insecticide-may-have-entered-uk-eu-warns
Martin Brown
2017-08-10 12:22:42 UTC
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Post by Norman Wells
Post by MM
Post by Norman Wells
Each *year*, we eat about 12.6 billion eggs in the UK. If 20,000 of
those are contaminated, that's one in every 630,000, not one in a million.
Nit-picking.
That depends on whether you think deliberately inflating a figure by
nearly 60% is nit-picking or symptomatic of an even greater desire to
mislead.
Who is to say that the 20000 is an exact number?

Incidentally. They have in fact just revised it to about 700,000.
Post by Norman Wells
The fact, though, is that 20,000 contaminated eggs entered the food
supply that the Food Standards Agency is supposed to protect. Had they
been contaminated with something fatal, we could have be looking at up
to 20,000 deaths.
What is more worrying is that as usual the Belgian government covered it
up for some time up and this isn't their first offence. They have
previous and last time it was PCBs and dioxins in both chickens and eggs
(and at a much higher level causing bird fatalities).

Amazingly they managed to export most of the contaminated stuff before a
whistle blower spilled the beans.

https://www.thefreelibrary.com/The+Belgian+PCB+and+Dioxin+Incident+of+January-June+1999%3a+Exposure...-a077276497

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935101942744
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Martin Brown
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